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  • #16
    How true.
    If the game playing continues I will pull all of our DNA testing results and keep it just in the family.
    Some will say “we already have copied your results”, WRONG as we have not posted all of our DNA testing results. FTDNA customers are the only ones to see our results..
    We have already pulled our family tree out of circulation as genealogy is all but dead (It has been gobbeled up by big business"). I’m looking for DNA test results to be next. This is not fair for the adopted folks. Some groups can only see “DOLLAR SIGNS”, how much money can we make off of someone else’s testing results?.
    d

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    • #17
      RE Sorensen

      I just quickly checked the site again, and they DO check for 16519 (HVR1). Before, when I entered it, it flashed red. So I guess they expanded their range.

      I haven't dug out my various results from various labs, but I recall an answer from Sorensen saying they don't give out my results from the sample I sent them (mouth wash). But I used their afiliated commercial lab for a test (swabs), and that is what is on the website. I can only hope that the two different samples came out the same.

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      • #18
        RE Sorensen again

        After adding my 16519 (HVR1), I have to go to 2 differences before I get any respnse at all. There are no matches with "none" or one difference. So maybe my mtDNA lineage is German afterall. Otherwise, if it were British, I should have gotten a better match or two. This of course pertains to the Sorensen database, and not FTDNA.

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        • #19
          16519

          Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
          After adding my 16519 (HVR1), I have to go to 2 differences before I get any respnse at all. There are no matches with "none" or one difference. So maybe my mtDNA lineage is German afterall. Otherwise, if it were British, I should have gotten a better match or two. This of course pertains to the Sorensen database, and not FTDNA.
          I also have 16519 ( HVR1). SMGF search you have to keep switching companies to try and find match. I have no exact matches in SMGF and one at FTDNA but we are not related anywhere close.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Yaffa
            I also have 16519 ( HVR1). SMGF search you have to keep switching companies to try and find match. I have no exact matches in SMGF and one at FTDNA but we are not related anywhere close.
            No, you don't need to keep switching. When you're constructing your query, you should select the lab where you obtained your results. The results will show matches for whatever region you had coverage.

            For instance, if you tested at Oxford Ancestors, which covers bases 16001-16400, you don't know whether you would have a mutation at say 16519. SMGF will show you every record where you match in the region 16001-16400 and ignore records that have mutations 16401-16569.

            Here's a list of the ranges from different companies:

            http://www.smgf.org/mtdna/locations.jspx

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            • #21
              Thank you

              Ann,

              Thank you for that info. I am Haplogroup B but I seem to share some of the same #'s as Haplogroup H. I mach up on a few X markers to some H and HV. Still trying to completly understand this X test.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by darroll
                How true.
                If the game playing continues I will pull all of our DNA testing results and keep it just in the family.
                Some will say “we already have copied your results”, WRONG as we have not posted all of our DNA testing results. FTDNA customers are the only ones to see our results..
                We have already pulled our family tree out of circulation as genealogy is all but dead (It has been gobbeled up by big business"). I’m looking for DNA test results to be next. This is not fair for the adopted folks. Some groups can only see “DOLLAR SIGNS”, how much money can we make off of someone else’s testing results?.
                d
                I want to acknowledge your evident frustration and say I have felt similarly. Nevertheless, I hope your won't pull your DNA results from the public databases.

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                • #23
                  if they knew what they were doing it would be okay

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                  • #24
                    ... there is, of course, a contradiction between the collective/cooperative spirit of sharing DNA results and the market-driven mechanisms that make DNA tests available, reliable and, generally, affordable. We have to live with that contradiction ... and avoid recasting our personal and perennial frustration over 'not knowing what we want to know' as evidence of a market ignoring our needs.

                    Yup, the tests are not yet sufficiently definitive, the databases are too small, too many others do not test or test enough, some withhold results while poaching others' results, and some matches do not respond or are as ignorant as we.

                    Stay hopeful.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Yaffa
                      Ann,

                      Thank you for that info. I am Haplogroup B but I seem to share some of the same #'s as Haplogroup H. I mach up on a few X markers to some H and HV. Still trying to completly understand this X test.
                      B, H, and HV are the names of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (not the same thing as the X chromosome, which is found in the nucleus of the cell). Some locations in mtDNA are "hotspots," because we know they have mutated independently many times in different haplogroups. 16519C is one example. Some locations in HVR2 show up in practically everyone, because the Cambridge Reference Sequence has the rare version and everyone else is different from the CRS. Those locations are 263G and 315.1C.

                      Basically, you need to look at the whole pattern (your haplotype) and not focus too much on individual mutations.

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                      • #26
                        Thank you

                        Originally posted by Ann Turner
                        B, H, and HV are the names of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (not the same thing as the X chromosome, which is found in the nucleus of the cell). Some locations in mtDNA are "hotspots," because we know they have mutated independently many times in different haplogroups. 16519C is one example. Some locations in HVR2 show up in practically everyone, because the Cambridge Reference Sequence has the rare version and everyone else is different from the CRS. Those locations are 263G and 315.1C.

                        Basically, you need to look at the whole pattern (your haplotype) and not focus too much on individual mutations.
                        Thank you for this info on MT-DNA mutations. I knew the X is different but didn't know if some of my X results should collaborate with my MT-DNA. Should I ignore the results of my MT-DNA when tring to understand my X ?

                        Thanks

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                        • #27
                          [QUOTE=Jambalaia32]At Sorensons you have to know 4 generations of ancestors to participate and I only know 3, so I couldn't have participated and like I said they don't use haplogroups,and I like knowing my Haplogrup. Jambalaia32[QUOTE]

                          Sorenson makes exceptions for those without a 4-gen genealogy. Write them.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Yaffa
                            Thank you for this info on MT-DNA mutations. I knew the X is different but didn't know if some of my X results should collaborate with my MT-DNA. Should I ignore the results of my MT-DNA when tring to understand my X ?
                            Yes, your X chromosome is a combination of contributions from many (but not all) of your ancestral lines. If you have my book "Trace Your Roots with DNA," there's a diagram on page 27 showing which ancestors can potentially contribute to your X chromosome.

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                            • #29
                              X Chromosome

                              Originally posted by Ann Turner
                              Yes, your X chromosome is a combination of contributions from many (but not all) of your ancestral lines. If you have my book "Trace Your Roots with DNA," there's a diagram on page 27 showing which ancestors can potentially contribute to your X chromosome.
                              Thank you Ann. I ordered your book and the the Sykes book. Amazon is seeling the 2 books together if anyone is interested.

                              I do understand that the the X recombines every generation through females on both maternal and paternal side. When a father passes his X down to a daughter this is the only time X will not recombine.

                              Dr. Krahn told me it is rare, 3% chance, that when a female passes one X to her offspring from her 2 X comosomes that her 2 X will not recombine to pass down a new X to her children

                              What I am trying to understand is how one could ever tell ethnicity from X markers if the X chromosome is always recombining through females? ( leaving out markers 10074,10075,10079 that don't recombine )

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                              • #30
                                Ann's Book

                                Hi Ann,
                                I did not know you had a book out. where can I buy one?

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