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  • what were your ancestor in 500 bc really like

    what were your ancestor in 500 bc really like
    were they stupid could they ever have been as smart as say us
    my bet is they were just like us and lets go back to 4000 bc .i bet they were too.solereans had a problem with juvinelle delinquints in cave doing the art of their gang

    what if like the story someone finds a subway and a city train with the artwork on it?

    greece was supposed to have created pie but the pyramid builders did 2400bc so they would of much more advanced like the story says
    ------------------------------------------
    Scientists Unravel Mystery of Ancient Machine
    By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS, AP

    ATHENS, Greece (Dec. 1) - Imagine tossing a top-notch laptop into the sea, leaving scientists from a foreign culture to scratch their heads over its corroded remains centuries later.

    A Roman shipmaster inadvertently did something just like that 2,000 years ago off southern Greece, experts said Thursday.

    They claim to have identified a handful of puzzling metal scraps found in a ship wreck as the earliest known mechanical computing device, which pinpointed astronomical events.

    A team including British, Greek and U.S. scientists used specially developed X-ray scanning and imaging technology to analyze the corroded bronze, revealing hidden machinery and a form of written user's manual.

    "We have used the latest technology available to understand this mechanism, yet the technological quality in this mechanism puts us to shame," project leader Mike Edmunds, professor of astronomy at Cardiff University. "If the ancient Greeks made this, what else could they do?"

    He spoke at a two-day conference that opened in Athens on Thursday. The team's findings also were published in Nature magazine.

    Known as the Antikythera Mechanism - from the island off which the Roman ship sank - the assemblage of cogs and wheels looks like the innards of a very badly maintained grandfather clock. But the first clockwork devices appeared more than a thousand years later in Western Europe.

    "It was a pocket calculator of the time," said John Seiradakis, a professor of astronomy at the University of Thessaloniki who served on the international team.

    Ever since its discovery a century ago, the complex mechanism has baffled scientists.

    Edmunds said the 82 surviving fragments, dated to between 140-100 B.C, contain more than 30 gear wheels, and "are covered with astronomical, mathematical and mechanical inscriptions."

    "It was a calendar of the moon and sun, it predicted the possibility of eclipses, it showed the position of the sun and moon in the zodiac, the phase of the moon, and we believe also it may have shown the position of some of the planets, possibly just Venus and Mercury," he said.

    The box-shaped mechanism - the size of office paper and operated with a hand-crank - could predict an eclipse to a precise hour on a specific day.

    The new study of the ancient device, with the aid of Hewlett Packard and the British X-ray equipment maker X-Tek, more than doubled the amount of the inscriptions readable on the mechanism.

    "We will not yet be able to answer the question of what the mechanism was for, although now we know what the mechanism did," Edmunds said.

    His fellow team member, Xenophon Moussas, an associate professor of space physics at Athens University, speculated that the device could have been used for navigation at sea or for mapmaking.

    The first comparable devices known in the West were clockwork clocks developed during the Middle Ages.

    Nature magazine suggested that the know-how for these mediaeval clocks may have reached Europe from the east after the fall of Baghdad - capital of a highly cultured, prosperous Islamic state - to the Mongols in the 13th century.

    The Antikythera device was probably made on the island of Rhodes, which had a long tradition in astronomy and applied mechanics.

    The ship, which sank in the first century B.C. and is thought to have been carrying plunder from Roman-conquered Greece to Rome, is believed to have sailed from Rhodes.

    The wreck was found in 1900 by Greek sponge-divers 164 feet deep and just off the small island of Antikythera, on what is still a busy trade route between southern mainland Greece and Crete.


    12/01/06 18:24 EST

  • #2
    Interesting read.

    Articles like this always make me wonder how many times throughout history the progress of humankind was stalled or set back by ignorance, foolishness and anger.

    Like Leonardo Da Vinci's Gran Cavallo horse statue never coming to life because the bronze was used instead to make weapons. And finally the life-size clay model was completely destroyed by the French soldiers who used it for target practice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Cavemen deserve more credit than given...

      Originally posted by Jim Denning
      what were your ancestor in 500 bc really like
      were they stupid could they ever have been as smart as say us
      my bet is they were just like us and lets go back to 4000 bc .i bet they were too.solereans had a problem with juvinelle delinquints in cave doing the art of their gang

      what if like the story someone finds a subway and a city train with the artwork on it?

      greece was supposed to have created pie but the pyramid builders did 2400bc so they would of much more advanced like the story says
      ------------------------------------------
      Scientists Unravel Mystery of Ancient Machine
      By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS, AP

      ATHENS, Greece (Dec. 1) - Imagine tossing a top-notch laptop into the sea, leaving scientists from a foreign culture to scratch their heads over its corroded remains centuries later.

      A Roman shipmaster inadvertently did something just like that 2,000 years ago off southern Greece, experts said Thursday.

      They claim to have identified a handful of puzzling metal scraps found in a ship wreck as the earliest known mechanical computing device, which pinpointed astronomical events.

      A team including British, Greek and U.S. scientists used specially developed X-ray scanning and imaging technology to analyze the corroded bronze, revealing hidden machinery and a form of written user's manual.

      "We have used the latest technology available to understand this mechanism, yet the technological quality in this mechanism puts us to shame," project leader Mike Edmunds, professor of astronomy at Cardiff University. "If the ancient Greeks made this, what else could they do?"

      He spoke at a two-day conference that opened in Athens on Thursday. The team's findings also were published in Nature magazine.

      Known as the Antikythera Mechanism - from the island off which the Roman ship sank - the assemblage of cogs and wheels looks like the innards of a very badly maintained grandfather clock. But the first clockwork devices appeared more than a thousand years later in Western Europe.

      "It was a pocket calculator of the time," said John Seiradakis, a professor of astronomy at the University of Thessaloniki who served on the international team.

      Ever since its discovery a century ago, the complex mechanism has baffled scientists.

      Edmunds said the 82 surviving fragments, dated to between 140-100 B.C, contain more than 30 gear wheels, and "are covered with astronomical, mathematical and mechanical inscriptions."

      "It was a calendar of the moon and sun, it predicted the possibility of eclipses, it showed the position of the sun and moon in the zodiac, the phase of the moon, and we believe also it may have shown the position of some of the planets, possibly just Venus and Mercury," he said.

      The box-shaped mechanism - the size of office paper and operated with a hand-crank - could predict an eclipse to a precise hour on a specific day.

      The new study of the ancient device, with the aid of Hewlett Packard and the British X-ray equipment maker X-Tek, more than doubled the amount of the inscriptions readable on the mechanism.

      "We will not yet be able to answer the question of what the mechanism was for, although now we know what the mechanism did," Edmunds said.

      His fellow team member, Xenophon Moussas, an associate professor of space physics at Athens University, speculated that the device could have been used for navigation at sea or for mapmaking.

      The first comparable devices known in the West were clockwork clocks developed during the Middle Ages.

      Nature magazine suggested that the know-how for these mediaeval clocks may have reached Europe from the east after the fall of Baghdad - capital of a highly cultured, prosperous Islamic state - to the Mongols in the 13th century.

      The Antikythera device was probably made on the island of Rhodes, which had a long tradition in astronomy and applied mechanics.

      The ship, which sank in the first century B.C. and is thought to have been carrying plunder from Roman-conquered Greece to Rome, is believed to have sailed from Rhodes.

      The wreck was found in 1900 by Greek sponge-divers 164 feet deep and just off the small island of Antikythera, on what is still a busy trade route between southern mainland Greece and Crete.


      12/01/06 18:24 EST
      Interestingly about a year ago, archeologists finally realized the marking above one of the animal figures in a prehistoric cave was the lunar cycle. We're pretty stupid for all the technology we have at our disposal, and for too long we've been riding the high horse of self-glory and achievement in ignorance of what our ancestors really knew. We simply gave them no credit for their abilities and achievements, and downplayed every modern possibility.

      Stonehenge and the spread of the megalithic culture(s) is a perfect example how we don't know how they transported several tons of stone. Even with using today's machinery and technology, think of the logistical headaches we would have today moving these stones; 6,000 years later. Same goes for the pyramids.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Arch Yeomans
        Interestingly about a year ago, archeologists finally realized the marking above one of the animal figures in a prehistoric cave was the lunar cycle. We're pretty stupid for all the technology we have at our disposal, and for too long we've been riding the high horse of self-glory and achievement in ignorance of what our ancestors really knew. We simply gave them no credit for their abilities and achievements, and downplayed every modern possibility.

        Stonehenge and the spread of the megalithic culture(s) is a perfect example how we don't know how they transported several tons of stone. Even with using today's machinery and technology, think of the logistical headaches we would have today moving these stones; 6,000 years later. Same goes for the pyramids.

        do you know stone hedge built at a different time lines up with a baseline of the pyramid [great] what a chance happenin.

        what i think is man was very smart got very dumb and is just now returning to some abillity to think.

        we get caught up in an excepted therory and figure a path and forever that path is frozen in time amd cement.forget we find something new that says no

        personaly i am excited with this dna stuff cause it says all of us intermingled every chance we could. and we are all related . thats great no room for bigotry or other stupidity

        btw africa had a wondeful system until the enlightened europeans came and killed it. which again says the oldest are the smartest [for the most part]

        i used to listen to a guy who said never write a paper until your 60 something or older.
        because if you write it at 29 you'll spend the rest of your life defending it.
        and not writing other stuff

        think about that isnt that human nature at its basist

        imagine if 30 yrs from now you have to defend some post here some you write at 2am and cant see the keys
        Last edited by Jim Denning; 2 December 2006, 10:27 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Articles on Ancient History.

          ANCIENT HISTORY:

          http:/www.livius.org/home.html

          Nas.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Arch Yeomans
            Interestingly about a year ago, archeologists finally realized the marking above one of the animal figures in a prehistoric cave was the lunar cycle. We're pretty stupid for all the technology we have at our disposal, and for too long we've been riding the high horse of self-glory and achievement in ignorance of what our ancestors really knew. We simply gave them no credit for their abilities and achievements, and downplayed every modern possibility.

            Stonehenge and the spread of the megalithic culture(s) is a perfect example how we don't know how they transported several tons of stone. Even with using today's machinery and technology, think of the logistical headaches we would have today moving these stones; 6,000 years later. Same goes for the pyramids.
            That's supposing Cavemen are our R1b ancestors..

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Downer101
              That's supposing Cavemen are our R1b ancestors..

              AS WITH US whoever the cave men were those juvinille delequents were from all haplogroup. just like the kids in ny subways are from all haplogroups.

              actually the old way of looking at types of people is they all were simulair in groups. in reality people live in deverse groups. which is great for the gene pool and modern science has changed this old therory.

              what this does is stop one country for saying all of another county is inferior.

              Comment


              • #8
                cavemen

                Originally posted by Downer101
                That's supposing Cavemen are our R1b ancestors..
                They are in some way or another I suppose.

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE=Jim Denning]what were your ancestor in 500 bc really like
                  were they stupid could they ever have been as smart as say us
                  my bet is they were just like us and lets go back to 4000 bc .i bet they were too.solereans had a problem with juvinelle delinquints in cave doing the art of their gang

                  what if like the story someone finds a subway and a city train with the artwork on it?

                  greece was supposed to have created pie but the pyramid builders did 2400bc so they would of much more advanced like the story says
                  ------------------------------------------
                  Scientists Unravel Mystery of Ancient Machine
                  By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS, AP

                  ATHENS, Greece (Dec. 1) - Imagine tossing a top-notch laptop into the sea, leaving scientists from a foreign culture to scratch their heads over its corroded remains centuries later.

                  A Roman shipmaster inadvertently did something just like that 2,000 years ago off southern Greece, experts said Thursday.

                  They claim to have identified a handful of puzzling metal scraps found in a ship wreck as the earliest known mechanical computing device, which pinpointed astronomical events.

                  A team including British, Greek and U.S. scientists used specially developed X-ray scanning and imaging technology to analyze the corroded bronze, revealing hidden machinery and a form of written user's manual.

                  "We have used the latest technology available to understand this mechanism, yet the technological quality in this mechanism puts us to shame," project leader Mike Edmunds, professor of astronomy at Cardiff University. "If the ancient Greeks made this, what else could they do?"

                  He spoke at a two-day conference that opened in Athens on Thursday. The team's findings also were published in Nature magazine.

                  Known as the Antikythera Mechanism - from the island off which the Roman ship sank - the assemblage of cogs and wheels looks like the innards of a very badly maintained grandfather clock. But the first clockwork devices appeared more than a thousand years later in Western Europe.

                  "It was a pocket calculator of the time," said John Seiradakis, a professor of astronomy at the University of Thessaloniki who served on the international team.

                  Ever since its discovery a century ago, the complex mechanism has baffled scientists.

                  Edmunds said the 82 surviving fragments, dated to between 140-100 B.C, contain more than 30 gear wheels, and "are covered with astronomical, mathematical and mechanical inscriptions."

                  "It was a calendar of the moon and sun, it predicted the possibility of eclipses, it showed the position of the sun and moon in the zodiac, the phase of the moon, and we believe also it may have shown the position of some of the planets, possibly just Venus and Mercury," he said.

                  The box-shaped mechanism - the size of office paper and operated with a hand-crank - could predict an eclipse to a precise hour on a specific day.

                  The new study of the ancient device, with the aid of Hewlett Packard and the British X-ray equipment maker X-Tek, more than doubled the amount of the inscriptions readable on the mechanism.

                  "We will not yet be able to answer the question of what the mechanism was for, although now we know what the mechanism did," Edmunds said.

                  His fellow team member, Xenophon Moussas, an associate professor of space physics at Athens University, speculated that the device could have been used for navigation at sea or for mapmaking.

                  The first comparable devices known in the West were clockwork clocks developed during the Middle Ages.

                  Nature magazine suggested that the know-how for these mediaeval clocks may have reached Europe from the east after the fall of Baghdad - capital of a highly cultured, prosperous Islamic state - to the Mongols in the 13th century.

                  The Antikythera device was probably made on the island of Rhodes, which had a long tradition in astronomy and applied mechanics.

                  The ship, which sank in the first century B.C. and is thought to have been carrying plunder from Roman-conquered Greece to Rome, is believed to have sailed from Rhodes.

                  The wreck was found in 1900 by Greek sponge-divers 164 feet deep and just off the small island of Antikythera, on what is still a busy trade route between southern mainland Greece and Crete.

                  I read about this device about 10 years go, it said then, a computer that is over a thousand years old.
                  Next they'll find a thousand year old DVD player. HA !
                  But joking aside, this is all very interesting, I believe the ancients were closer to the earth, then we are today, they knew more about the planets, the seasons, and such alot better then us today.
                  We today, spend most of our time indoors, never seeing a full moon at night or a sunrise in the morning, they lived a slower pace then us today, today, everybodys got to go go go ! no time to slow down and enjoy life.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    that really depends on them not being tribes of the keltoi nation.
                    just brothers

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=Jim Denning]what were your ancestor in 500 bc really like
                      were they stupid could they ever have been as smart as say us

                      Augustus De Morgan was born in the early 18xx’s. He studied Aristotle and accepted some of his theorems for boolean algebra..
                      Why was he toying with computer/gate switch technology in the early 1800’s?

                      In logic, De Morgan's laws (or De Morgan's theorem) are rules in formal logic relating pairs of dual logical operators in a systematic manner expressed in terms of negation. The relationship so induced is called De Morgan duality.
                      The rule states that each of the following claims is logically equivalent to the one next to it and may be legally transformed from one to the other in either direction:
                      In extensions of classical propositional logic, the duality still holds (that is, to any logical operator we can always find its dual), since in the presence of the identities governing negation, one may always introduce an operator that is the De Morgan dual of another. This leads to an important property of logics based on classical logic, namely the existence of negation normal forms: any formula is equivalent to another formula where negations only occur applied to the non-logical atoms of the formula. The existence of negation normal forms drives many applications, for example in digital circuit design, where it is used to manipulate the types of logic gates, and in formal logic, where it is a prerequisite for finding the conjunctive normal form and disjunctive normal form of a formula. Computer programmers use them to change a complicated statement like IF ... AND (... OR ...) THEN ... into its opposite. They are also often useful in computations in elementary probability theory.
                      In electrical engineering contexts, the negation operator can be written as an overline above the terms to be negated. Thus, electrical engineering students are often taught to remember DeMorgan's laws using the mnemonic "break the line, change the sign".

                      Comment

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