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A Marker Mutation Rate Chart

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  • A Marker Mutation Rate Chart

    I didn't have a feel for the term "fast moving" markers and decided to look into it.
    It appears to me that there is enough information out there to generally classify markers as fast, average, and slow in terms of their mutation rates.
    There is a color-coded chart to show this at
    http://hurlbutdna.pbwiki.com/DNA%20M...tation%20Rates
    Last edited by GilH; 30 November 2006, 12:03 PM.

  • #2
    Thanks for the link. These are just averages, right? I wonder if there are "really fast" moving markers? Does anyone know based on their surname project experience? I mean, is it possible that a marker mutates once every 50 or 100 years?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Paul_Sheats
      Thanks for the link. These are just averages, right? I wonder if there are "really fast" moving markers? Does anyone know based on their surname project experience? I mean, is it possible that a marker mutates once every 50 or 100 years?
      Whether it is fast or slow, it COULD have occured in a very recent generation.

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      • #4
        Paul,

        Gwenboucher is right. These mutation rates are averages for each marker which have been observed in many, many paternal lines.

        The concept to think of is the bell curve. A bell curve is called that because it's shaped like a bell. Most of the results are in the middle of the range, making it the highest part of the curve. Then the results gradually decline as you move away from the middle of the range in both directions. The lowest parts of the curve are at the minimum and maximum of the range. Those are what is known as "outliers" as far as marker values.

        Of course, any paternal line can be at any point of this bell curve of mutation rates. Some paternal lines will be "outliers" and have either a lower or higher mutation rate than the average. Also, any paternal line can have a higher than average mutation rate on specific markers or lower than average mutation rate on specific markers or even some combination.

        The bottom line is that mutation rates, both for markers and paternal lines, is a question of averages and probabilities. Once you keep that in mind as a rough guide, you can look at specific cases and make adjustments where necessary to take into account what the results are showing.

        Mike Maddi

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        • #5
          Thanks for the explanations. I was aware they could occur recently. I was more curious about what the fastest observed rates based on actual surname studies that don't fit the norm. Like the ones in the 10% that are outside the norm. So I guess my question is... for an individual family lineage, what is the fastest observed mututation rate and what markers are involved? Maybe that is not very easily answered.

          I saw the chart based on a simulation that vineviz created (via ISOGG) that shows how far off in GD you can be and still be related in x generations. This applied to about 10% of the cases, but importantly, the paper trail must correlate the relation.
          Last edited by Paul_Sheats; 2 December 2006, 02:54 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Paul_Sheats
            Thanks for the explanations. I was aware they could occur recently. I was more curious about what the fastest observed rates based on actual surname studies that don't fit the norm. Like the ones in the 10% that are outside the norm. So I guess my question is... for an individual family lineage, what is the fastest observed mututation rate and what markers are involved? Maybe that is not very easily answered.

            I saw the chart based on a simulation that vineviz created (via ISOGG) that shows how far off in GD you can be and still be related in x generations. This applied to about 10% of the cases, but importantly, the paper trail must correlate the relation.
            Yes, I should have added your last sentence to my explanation. DNA test results don't prove anything by themselves, due to the differences in mutation rates among paternal lines and the probabilities involved. The results will give you a ballpark estimate of when the common ancestor lived. It's the paper trail research that will nail that down.

            Mike

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