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Can an intermarriage of first cousins change mutation rates?

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  • Can an intermarriage of first cousins change mutation rates?

    I have in my lineage an intermarriage of first cousins- could this cause a major affect in my alleles? Enough to skew values to be 2 and 3 away on a twelve marker and 10 away on a 25 in a modal of 7 seperate lines? How could such a difference possibly be explained?

    I know to some of you all I may be beating a dead horse and I apologise for the redundant questions, but I must be 100% certain about my findings.
    Last edited by SaintManx; 22 November 2006, 11:39 PM. Reason: add info.

  • #2
    Originally posted by SaintManx
    I have in my lineage an intermarriage of first cousins- could this cause a major affect in my alleles? Enough to skew values to be 2 and 3 away on a twelve marker and 10 away on a 25 in a modal of 7 seperate lines? How could such a difference possibly be explained?

    I know to some of you all I may be beating a dead horse and I apologise for the redundant questions, but I must be 100% certain about my findings.
    Y doesn't recombine, even with first cousins.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Gene2005
      Would you tell me more.please. I would like to learn more about this topit.
      Only men have a y-chromosome, so there is no way for a son of that man to get anything other than an intact copy )+/- the normal random mutations) of the father's y-chromosme.

      There is no known mechanism for the identity of the mother to affect the mutation of the y-chromosome.

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      • #4
        Intermarriage between close relatives does NOT accelerate the mutation rate. However, it does accelerate the rate of genetic drift. Whenever a child is conceived, it gets half of its nuclear DNA from each parent. The often untold story is that half from each parent is thrown away, at least as far as the child is concerned.

        Whwen sizeable portions of the genome are identical, there is a greater chance that at least one copy of the identical portions will be saved, when compared to the non-identical portions.

        The law of averages says that first cousins should share about 1/8 of the same DNA -which isn't really much. But if over countless generations, there are a series of cousin intermarriages, this would add up & a lot of genetic drift would occur.

        Timothy Peterman

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