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  • Ethnic ancestry

    What does it mean when you have no ethnic ancestry at 37 markers, there is on the 12 and 25 markers. Should I just assume it stayed the same or some fluke?

    Also it has one-step, two-step, etc does that mean at one-step you are more one ethnicty and less so at 2 steps, etc. I.E. English at 1 step and Irish and Scottish at 2 step, and so forth.

    Thanks for the help!!

  • #2
    There is no one-to-one correspondence between matches you see on your "Recent Ancestral Origin" page and your own actual ancestral origin. The matches and the countries of origin are not a prediction of your ancestral origin. They are more like a guide to your POSSIBLE origin that can be further investigated through a genealogical paper trail and more advanced tests.

    One problem is that, because so many Americans have British Isles ancestry and seem to be more involved in genealogy than other ancestral origins in the U.S, the DNA databases, including that of FTDNA, are heavily weighted toward British Isles ancestry. That is why you'll see so many matches with people with British Isles ancestry.

    Unless you know or have some evidence that your ancestry is actually from the British Isles, it's best to treat those matches with many grains of salt. It may be that you have less matches with ancestry from Germany or Spain or Italy or Poland, but that those matches are a higher percentage of the FTDNA customers with German or Spanish or Italian or Polish ancestry. In that case, those other ancestral origins may be more relevant to your ancestry.

    Mike Maddi

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    • #3
      Recent Ethnic Origin, is a misleading term.

      The REO tables show matches to what people in the database wrote as THEIR OWN ethnic origin; THEY COULD BE MISTAKEN, especially as multigenerational US immigrants form most of the FTDNA comparison database.
      And "Ethnic" may teasingly state a geographic or national administrative classification, even a religious, cultural , or linguistic label. The further back in time you go, the more difficult it is to connect increasingly obsolete "peoplegroup labels" to the genetic entity you now possess.

      If you have no matches, that reflects relative poverty of the database to which you are offering your results for matching. The more detailed your results, the less likely you are to encounter a match.
      SO, keep offering your results to the FTDNA base every few months and also search out other databases, including foreign ones.

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      • #4
        speaking of poverty of information

        Originally posted by derinos
        The REO tables show matches to what people in the database wrote as THEIR OWN ethnic origin; THEY COULD BE MISTAKEN, especially as multigenerational US immigrants form most of the FTDNA comparison database.
        And "Ethnic" may teasingly state a geographic or national administrative classification, even a religious, cultural , or linguistic label. The further back in time you go, the more difficult it is to connect increasingly obsolete "peoplegroup labels" to the genetic entity you now possess.

        If you have no matches, that reflects relative poverty of the database to which you are offering your results for matching. The more detailed your results, the less likely you are to encounter a match.
        SO, keep offering your results to the FTDNA base every few months and also search out other databases, including foreign ones.
        I think this is one reason why Family Tree offered Ysearch. It is without a doubt the world's largest database on the Internet (unless I've really missed one). I sure as heck don't hear much about them, except Sorenson, EA, and Oxford Ancestors. Everything else is pretty much a no-namer to me.

        When I peruse the Internet for R1b1c6 information, it's interesting how I'm able to obtain more information from the study papers than the databases. I'm hoping they will make more usefulness of the data such as identifying ethnic origins and a more specific geographical analysis of where the DNA was created. Hopefully the autosomal testing will prove useful as well.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Twyla
          What does it mean when you have no ethnic ancestry at 37 markers, there is on the 12 and 25 markers.
          The Recent Ancestral Origins tab only shows very near neighbors. At 37 markers, you may simply have no neighbors quite so close.

          What you can do is to upload your DNA results into the Ysearch database, semi-automatically through the hyperlink on your Y-DNA Matches tab. In the Ysearch database, you can search for neighbors in a wider circle, so to speak.

          If you have difficulty doing this, ask here for help.

          But as another poster explained, the lists of neighbors and their self-reported origins is not a definitive statement of your own ancestry; it is more like a strong hint, meant to assist you in your genealogical investigation. Also note that the yDNA test only looks at your strict patrilineal line: your father's father's father's father[...].

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