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  • #91
    Спасибо (Spasibo) - Thanks!

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    • #92
      Dear Friends,

      Whether somebody met DNA genealogy of Kalmyks? Perhaps, may be you saw results of DNA testing of Kalmyks? May be you saw special web site about Kalmyks DNA?

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Grigoriev
        Dear Friends,

        Whether somebody met DNA genealogy of Kalmyks? Perhaps, may be you saw results of DNA testing of Kalmyks? May be you saw special web site about Kalmyks DNA?
        how about this one:

        http://www.eva.mpg.de/genetics/pdf/kalmyks.pdf

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        • #94
          Thank you, very much!

          Hm... When I ask my Q. I thinked (hope) to find out info about O3 hg in DNA of Kalmyks.. But, there are no anyone O3 haplogoups

          In wich populations of former USSR I can find O3a5??

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          • #95
            Grigoriev:

            the shi paper on haplogroup O shows 5% O3 in Central Asia, but none in Siberia. Also, it is very common in NE China and Korea. So as a guess you could find it in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, as well as perhaps near the Amur river. But that is obviously a guess.

            cacio

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            • #96
              cacio, thanks...
              eahmm...

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              • #97
                It's hard to be a pioneer.

                Originally posted by cacio View Post
                I have quickly browsed a couple of papers, but they are old and I am having trouble translating the haplogroups into their modern names. However, it appears that around 50% of Mongols belong to haplogroup C (including the supposed Gengish Khan's as well). After that, it seems it is a combination of O, N and similar ones. Instead, D (YAP) is less than 5%. A sample from the Siberian population of Evenki appears to be along similar lines.

                D is however common in Japan and Tibet (around 30% or more). So it seems as usual the Nat Geographic website is simplifying things a bit, because it doesn't seem haplogroup D is common between Japan and Tibet. D was also found in isolated populations along the South Asian coast (eg Anamanese), so this shows that it was indeed one of the early migrants along the Asian coast (together with C).


                cacio
                It seems that Haplogroup D initiated moving on from Africa, but with time became rare or may be it was always rare. I ma Haplogroup D, maternal. I also have haplogroup C. Does that mean I descend from Ghinghis Khan or not?

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                • #98
                  Zadornov is right

                  Originally posted by cacio View Post
                  Grigoriev:

                  yes, that's what the article says. Expand means here to grow in numbers, it doesn't mean to migrate or move in the article. The article claims that in the north there was an earlier demographic increase (may be 20-30K years ago), while in the south population grew later (may be 12-18K years ago). The paper suggest that one possible explanation may be that the north was rich in big animals which could be hunted, while the south relied more on plants, and so had to wait on better climate and technologies.

                  Note that the paper doesn't say anything about migrations, or about the current composition of the population. In particular, it doesn't say much about O and its origin. As you've read in other article, O is clearly associated with the Han and their expansion.

                  cacio
                  Zadornov is right when he propagates idea that Russian roots came from the North. Since Northern population expansion happened earlier, 20-30- thousand years ago, than expansion in the South, 18-12 thousands years ago. 12 to 18 thousand years is a huge distance in time. May be back then northern part of EuroAsia had better climate than very hot southern parts?

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