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  • SubClade R1B1C, Whats next

    Question, I'm an R1B1C, if I do the sub Clade test and get a # to go with my present rating will that give me a finalizaton on my pre american ancestry?

  • #2
    Originally posted by bing
    Question, I'm an R1B1C, if I do the sub Clade test and get a # to go with my present rating will that give me a finalizaton on my pre american ancestry?
    That depends. If you do the deep clade R1b tests with FTDNA, you will be tested for subclades R1b1c1, R1b1c2, ...through R1b1c8. Of these only R1b1c7 has been localized (sort of - to Ireland - but there are European examples too, suggesting it may have existed before it went to Ireland and proliferated). Examples of R1b1c4 (barely) and R1b1c6 have been found, but their localization in Europe has not been determined (despite some claims they originated in Iberia). For British R1b1c6 though, it does appear that it is at least most heavily concentrated in the SW of England and Cornwall. R1b1c1, 2, 3, 5, and 8 seem to be busts. Another company, Ethnoancestry, offers tests for R1b1c9 (plus 9a and 9b) and R1b1c10. These subclades occur at reasonably high levels within R1b1c (I guess about 20 and 10% respectively). An R1b1c9 from England is possibly descended from the Anglo-Saxon invaders. I'd guess about 50 or 60% of R1b1c folks who order all the currently available R1b1c subclade tests will be negative on all of them - i.e., R1b1c*.

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    • #3
      What waits next? A LONG wait! I belong to Batch 155 and FTDNA is not even close to predicting my R1b1c* *subclade. So just sit down and wait for a long time as FTDNA doesn't care one way or the other about the wait you are about to impose if you choose to spend your dollars for that R1b-SNP test...

      WAIT...WAIT...WAIT!!!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bing
        Question, I'm an R1B1C, if I do the sub Clade test and get a # to go with my present rating will that give me a finalizaton on my pre american ancestry?
        Let me guess. Is that the 'line' that an FTDNA salesperson gave you?

        It is barely possible that you might be classified as R1b1c4, R1b1c6, or R1b1c7. If so, that is of some value, though it does not localize as much as you are hoping. As another poster says, R1b1c9 and R1b1c10 are more interesting, but are not tested by FTDNA.

        The general rule is that You should not even consider a deepSNP test until after you have upgraded to the full 67 markers. At 67 markers, your haplogroup and even your subclade will usually be obvious, either from specific marker values or simply from your nearest neighbors. More importantly, your 67 markers will give the fullest possible indication of who else you might be related to, and how far back.

        Only after upgrading to the full 67 markers should you even consider a deepSNP test.

        That's my opinion, anyway. As you can see, I have been underwhelmed by FTDNA's deepSNP tests, including their agonizing delays. I really wish FTDNA would offer a simple 1-SNP test for, say, $20, simply as a double-sure confirmation of one's haplogroup.

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        • #5
          ?

          THe 67 Marker is the test that I got and they said i'm in R1b1c so this is most likely right ... I was going to order deep subclade test...But you don't think they can really narrow it down much more?

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          • #6
            A company in England called Ethnoancestry offers tests to break down R1b1c into subclades that Family Tree DNA doesn't test for. However, you are more likely to be positive for these if your R1b1c ancestors came from the continent: France, germany, Switzerland, Italy, etc. Go to www.isogg.org to get details about these additional haplogroups.

            My R1b1c ancestors were Swiss. Ethnoancestry determined that my y-DNA is S28+, which means R1b1c10, which happens to be concentrated in the Alps. Yet Family Tree DNA & ysearch.org still call my results R1b1c*

            Timothy Peterman
            Kansas City, MO

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            • #7
              Originally posted by T E Peterman
              A company in England called Ethnoancestry offers tests to break down R1b1c into subclades that Family Tree DNA doesn't test for. However, you are more likely to be positive for these if your R1b1c ancestors came from the continent: France, germany, Switzerland, Italy, etc. Go to www.isogg.org to get details about these additional haplogroups.

              My R1b1c ancestors were Swiss. Ethnoancestry determined that my y-DNA is S28+, which means R1b1c10, which happens to be concentrated in the Alps. Yet Family Tree DNA & ysearch.org still call my results R1b1c*

              Timothy Peterman
              Kansas City, MO
              Some of the SNPs that EthnoAncestry tests for were discovered by them which is why they are the only company to offer them (they are the SNPs sthat start with the letter "S"). They have not published their research which would include the methods to test for those markers which is why other companies don't offer them yet. The SNP S21, which defines R1b1c9 has been discussed in new research papers in the last year and is known as U106 in one paper and M405 in another, so perhaps FTDNA could start testing for it. S26 was actually discovered by FTDNA with Leo Little but they called it L1. L1/S26 is associated with a null value at DYS 439 when tested at FTDNA. S29 which defines R1b1c9b also appeared in the previously mentioned papers and is also known as U198 and M467. S28 which defines R1b1c10 is also known as U152. EthnoAncestry has a new SNP in their Custom Select SNPs called S68 which defines a new subclade called R1b1c11. FTDNA recently added R1b1c9 as a haplogroup on Ysearch so I assume that they will offer S21/U106/M405 eventually, the question is which name will they use for it.

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