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  • #16
    Originally posted by spruithean View Post

    Yes, they could be, although with 3rd cousins at various levels of removal the chances for smaller shared segments to no shared segments increases. Do you know if those 11 shared kits share known ancestors with you and your second cousin?
    2nd Cousin or closer is the ideal, but may require at least 2 or three others to test in order to reliably "triangulate."

    3rd and even 4th Cousins at additional removes can also potentially be used, but the number of people who would need to test(on different "lines" in an ideal situation) starts to increase considerably as the odds against any one test matching BOTH(or even just one) people become increasingly bad. (Or the matter of the odds of being related by other means and matching that way)

    The wider the net that gets used, the more chances that someone is going to match one or more other people within the net, then you can start working out how those clusters fit together with other clusters. (Basically the theory behind DNA Circles on Ancestry, even if bad genealogical research on the part of others often generates less than ideal outcomes for that)
    Last edited by bartarl260; 7th May 2019, 09:16 AM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by PaMarn View Post
      .... We both have elder sisters, neither of whom have yet been tested.
      PaMarn - I would test both sisters (yours and your 2C's) if they're willing.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by PaMarn View Post
        Sorry, I should have made clear I uploaded both kits to GedMatch. That's where I get the 'No shared DNA' message. On reflection, my grandmother having been adopted is out of the question as I have her birth certificate.
        Birth certificates lie. I have twin brothers. Their birth certificates say their birth parents are the same as my parents, BUT they were adopted. I was born after they were adopted and my birth certificate was altered after being issued to say I am my mother's third child. You can see the 'white out' on my certificate. At least in Texas, it is common for the birth certificate of adopted children to show the adoptive parents as the birth parents if the adoption occurred soon after birth.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by spruithean View Post

          This doesn't really guarantee anything. I know of people who've found an ancestor to have been adopted, or the product of a NPE where the father that adopted them was declared on the birth certificate as the father.

          As suggested you could test older generations if possible, or look at various matches to see if any matches fit in the tree for one or both of the kits as suggested by ech124.
          Seconding this. Birth certificates show who the legal parents are. Their purpose is NOT to show who the biological parents are, but who the legal parents are. Usually both legal parents are also the biological parents, but sometimes one isn't (the most common reason for that is "non-paternal events," i.e. infidelity by or rape of the mother), and sometimes neither of them are (adoption or babies switched at birth).

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