Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ICW match with both mother and father

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ICW match with both mother and father

    So, I did an "In Common With" check with a recent (March 2019) FTDNA match, This woman and I match on 106 cMs, with a long of 33 cMs. IMO, a "no-brainer" cousin match. What's throwing me off is that this match is an "In Common With" match with BOTH my paternal uncle (he and I match at 1,527 cMs, with a long of 158 cMs) AND a person who I KNOW is a match with my MOTHER! This ICW match (on my mother's side) shares 79 cMs, with a long of 21 cMs.

    What does this mean? Where does this (106 cM) woman intersect in my parent's past?

  • #2
    Most likely: A paternal cousin married a maternal cousin.

    Work out the paper trail and you will have the correct answer.

    Comment


    • #3
      In common With just means that person shows up on both people's match lists. It is quite common. The odds are you are related to this person multiple ways at least once on the paternal side and at least once through most likely a different ancestor on the maternal side. But yes in this instance the In Common With tool isn't helping you much. Edit: Or this match is only related to your father's side only and your maternal match is related to you and this match through different ancestors.
      Last edited by mattn; 22nd April 2019, 09:11 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for both replies here. Much appreciated. Still, I'm lost here. Primarily, I'd say this is due to my mother's NPE (her unknown birth father), but there just seems so many possibilities.

        Comment


        • #5
          Families can be complicated. Genetic evidence alone is often not enough to point to a unique, correct solution. The general approach is to use whatever evidence is available, from traditional genealogy and sleuthing as well as genetic evidence, to construct ALL of the possible family trees, and then systematically to seek additional evidence that will allow you to rule out one or more of those trees, until only one tree, presumably the correct one, remains. Then, you continue to seek additional evidence in hopes of confirming that the solution you found was indeed the correct one. Finding that solution can take a long time, depending on who happens to show up as a match, the circumstances of the family, the availability of documents, etc. Somehow, the more difficult the problem, the more satisfying it is when the answer is found.

          Comment


          • #6
            On my father's side I regularly trace as far back in each line as I can. I've frequently found that a match will come to me from more than one of my family lines and/or marry someone who is also a cousin. I recently found a cousin who comes down to me from two paternal grandparents, and 1 maternal grandmother. The 3 great grandparents all went back to the same 2nd great grand auunt Her cousin married a man who matches down from the same family line as well.

            In the case of getting cross over from paternal to maternal lines, using the new beta grouping method, I have dedicated one color folder just for people who are showing matches to me from both my paternal and maternal lines. Ancestry, unfortunately doesn't have a chrome browser to see the exact match.

            Studying history of western migration in the US has helped me figure out how several of my mom's and dad's lines seem to converge in Missouri, and end up in Utah.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by keigh View Post
              On my father's side I regularly trace as far back in each line as I can. I've frequently found that a match will come to me from more than one of my family lines and/or marry someone who is also a cousin. I recently found a cousin who comes down to me from two paternal grandparents, and 1 maternal grandmother. The 3 great grandparents all went back to the same 2nd great grand auunt Her cousin married a man who matches down from the same family line as well.

              In the case of getting cross over from paternal to maternal lines, using the new beta grouping method, I have dedicated one color folder just for people who are showing matches to me from both my paternal and maternal lines. Ancestry, unfortunately doesn't have a chrome browser to see the exact match.

              Studying history of western migration in the US has helped me figure out how several of my mom's and dad's lines seem to converge in Missouri, and end up in Utah.
              In my own DNA match list, I have one match who is related to me three different ways. Of course, 2 of the 3 paths involved a 1st cousin marriage. Then IIRC, a great-grandchild of that marriage turned around and married a 3rd cousin(relative to the person getting married) from that same line. didn't make my match list any more confusing as they all tied in at roughly the same spot on my tree. But I imagine it could make some heads spin for people who are more closely related to them.

              Comment

              Working...
              X