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22 of 25 match with a good paper trail to a common ancestor

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  • 22 of 25 match with a good paper trail to a common ancestor

    I am participating in the Rose family DNA project. A relative who is four generations removed from our common ancestor has a solid paper trail to our common ancestor. I also am four generations removed from the same ancestor with a solid paper trail back to our common ancestor. We BOTH have Native American genetics (we are also fair skinned and blue eyed!) but we only match on 22 of 25 markers. Both our families have remained within 30 miles of each other for the last 200 years.

    He (my relative) has had three other matches from outside our home state. One is a 25 of 25 match another is a 23 of 25 and a 24 of 25 match. I don't know how closely these other particpants match mine. I believe the Rose Family DNA project coordinator is using his as the reference for our common ancestor since his was submitted first.

    I am troubled by the fact that we both can trace to the same ancestor yet not match as close as other out of state participants.
    There is no indication of questionable parentage in either of our cases from our families. If this were the case then the questionable parent would have had to been a distant relative also.

    What is the likelyhood that our genetics could have mutated enough within four generations to produce this type of result?

    Should we search for a "mystery" relative who could have been the biological parent of one of our common ancestor's lines?

    If mutation is not the likely case then this is an anomaly and a genetic case that should be studied to see if something can be learned by the academic community.

    Open to all reasonable answers!

  • #2
    Which markers do you mismatch on? Are they the "fast mutating" markers? Do you share any "rare" values on any other markers? If so, I would tend to believe the paper trail. Although it is extremely improbable that you would mismatch on 3 markers, it is not impossible.

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    • #3
      Re: 22 of 25 match with a good paper trail to a common ancestor

      I have a mutation at marker #4, marker #10, and markers #12 and #13. I don't know if these are "fast mutating" markers or not.

      My numbers are the second row below (1st 13 markers only shown) . My relative's is the top row.

      12 25 13 10 15 17 12 12 13 14 14 31 18
      12 25 13 11 15 17 12 12 13 13 14 30 19

      The following is information supplied to me by David Brown who is coordinating the project:

      You will notice that yours actually differs on 4 numbers, but the 30 (at DYS 389ii) is dependant on the 13 (at DYS 389i). This means that these two only count as one step of mutation when they appear like this.

      Thanks for the reply,

      [email protected]

      Comment


      • #4
        The "fast mutating" markers are:
        5 - 385a
        6 - 385b
        9 - 439
        13 - 458
        21 - 449 and
        21-25 - 464a-d

        Only one of your mismatches (#13) is "fast mutating". David Brown is correct about #10 (DYS 389i) and #12 (389ii).

        I would be inclined to go with the paper trail, assuming it is well documented.

        I doubt that a "nonpaternal event" would produce test results with only 3 mutations, unless one of the two sons of your common ancestor was an adopted cousin. How many other Rose families were in the area at the time.

        How closely to you match with other Rose participants? I know the Rose project is one of the biggest DNA projects going.

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        • #5
          As far as I know my group is the only Rose family line that is Native American so we don't match any other Rose families in the database.

          There are other matches that are an exact match with the reference sample. (The reference DNA sample is a documented fourth cousin of mine) And others that have one or two markers that have mutated from the reference. The numbers for all the matches so far are below. Mine is the last set. The reference is the first set.

          12 25 13 10 15 17 12 12 13 14 14 31 18 8 9 11 11 27 13 19 28 14 14 15 16
          12 25 13 10 16 17 12 12 13 14 14 31 18 8 9 11 11 27 13 19 28 14 14 15 16
          12 25 13 10 14 17 12 12 13 14 14 32 18 8 9 11 11 27 13 19 28 14 14 15 16
          12 25 13 11 15 17 12 12 13 13 14 30 19 8 9 11 11 27 13 19 28 14 14 15 16



          Originally posted by jablair
          The "fast mutating" markers are:
          5 - 385a
          6 - 385b
          9 - 439
          13 - 458
          21 - 449 and
          21-25 - 464a-d

          Only one of your mismatches (#13) is "fast mutating". David Brown is correct about #10 (DYS 389i) and #12 (389ii).

          I would be inclined to go with the paper trail, assuming it is well documented.

          I doubt that a "nonpaternal event" would produce test results with only 3 mutations, unless one of the two sons of your common ancestor was an adopted cousin. How many other Rose families were in the area at the time.

          How closely to you match with other Rose participants? I know the Rose project is one of the biggest DNA projects going.

          Comment

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