Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mt-DNA Haplogroup I

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mt-DNA Haplogroup I

    What are the primary ethnic backgrounds for Haplogroup I?

  • #2
    Originally posted by BlackWolf
    What are the primary ethnic backgrounds for Haplogroup I?
    We are all over Europe and even the Middle East and Arabia, but always in very low concentrations. The "clan mother" of Haplogroup I lived around 30,000 years ago, perhaps in modern Iran, so her descendants have had plenty of time to spread out.

    That being said, Haplogroup I is found in slightly higher concentrations in northern Europe, for some reason. My background, for example, is primarily Scotch-Irish and English. I'm not sure I can be much more specific than that in answering your question; it seems that more research needs to be done on Haplogroup I.

    What are your specific mutations? Have you narrowed yourself down to a subclade (I1, I1a, etc.)?

    Cheers,
    britzkrieg

    Comment


    • #3
      Also see the mtDNA Haplogroup I Project page:

      http://www.familytreedna.com/(xe5hg145zokkla453uba5c55)/public/mtDNA%20I/index.aspx

      Cheers,
      britzkrieg

      Comment


      • #4
        New, to Mtdna but here is what it said. Hope this helps

        HVR1 Haplogroup
        I

        HVR1 differences

        from CRS

        16129A

        16223T

        16391A

        16519C

        Mutations:
        16130 TATTGTACGG
        16230 CCCTCAACTA
        16400 GTCCCTTGAC
        16520 CTTCAGGGTC

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi BlackWolf,

          I'm used to seeing mutations described differently. For instance, my mutations, including the Haplogroup I markers, are:

          16129A
          16171G
          16223T
          16293C
          16311C
          16391A
          16519C

          I think I've figured it out, though. In this format, your mutations seem to be:

          16129A
          16223T
          16391A
          16519C
          16138G
          16232C
          16400G
          16528T

          I ran this combination through MitoSearch.org but didn't find any matches. Not surprising -- you have a lot of mutations. I don't think any of them identify you with any existing subclade of Haplogroup I, but hopefully upcoming research will refine the subclades themselves.

          Again, I don't think I can really answer your original question. However, without knowing anything else about you, I'd wager that your mtDNA reflects a long northern European heritage, possibly anchored in the British Isles. Our remotest ancestors may have been the original inhabitants of Britain, in fact. It's hard to say, though, without more research.

          If you have any other questions, I'd be happy to try to answer them. I have a couple more websites I can share with you, if nothing else.

          Cheers,
          britzkrieg

          Comment


          • #6
            Blackwolf:

            I believe you've copied and pasted from your FTDNA page. Your mutations are the 4 you have listed.

            Confusingly, below this information FTDNA writes the whole HVR1 for _CRS_ (not yours, but CRS's), and highlights in red the ones you have different. So take the first line you have written:

            16130 TATTGTACGG

            16130 is actually the last number. So the second to last is 16129. This means that CRS has 16129G. It is highlighted because, instead, you have a different one, namely 16129A as indicated above. This works for the other 3 mutations as well. Confusing. If you had an insertion, it would appear in green inbetween the corresponding CRS entries.

            cacio

            Comment


            • #7
              Cacio --

              Thank you very much for pointing this out. Now I wish I could go back and delete my uninformed amateur analysis.

              BlackWolf --

              It seems you have a very basic Hap I profile, with no additional mutations. (I understand that the 519C mutation is "noise" and not useful for genographic purposes.) There are tons of matches for you on MitoSearch.org. If you look at the user profiles for your exact matches, you will see lots of maternal lines tracing back to northern Europe; Ireland seems to be particularly well-represented.

              Regards to you both,
              britzkrieg

              Comment


              • #8
                Very confusing but thats to you both for helping.

                Comment


                • #9
                  mtdna I

                  Being of haplogroup mtdna I also .... i thought there was and still could be a British Isle connection. My maternal side immigrated from Germany in the late 19th century to New York. I'm not sure how long they were in Germany for though because they were not well liked by the government and they apparently did not like the Kaiser at that time either. They were Mason's and had their own printing press. One of the relatives was murdered by someone in the government and the family felt it was time to immigrate to the U.S. My great-grandmother spoke about not originally being from Germany though but would never elaborate to us and neither would my mother. What's more peculiar is that my greatgrandmother had a particular fondness for tartans which we were all dressed up in as toddlers, one red tartan skirt we had to pose for pictures in. But, what totally blew my own personnal theory were the facts that my closest mutation's are from Turkey and Austria, hardly close to the British Isles. They are missing the 290T mutation otherwise we would be exact matches. Furthermore, National Geographic up-dated their Haplogroup information and pretty much stated that the more mutations you have for haplogroup mtdna I the longer time you spent in the middle east aquiring them. So, i think it just must be some weird kind of coincidence about the tartans..... and who knows where they orginally came from because i can't find any further information on my maternal family's side. My mito search user number is UPQGB.

                  Cheers,
                  Jenny Swedberg

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X