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  • Study finds a bit of caveman in many

    Hmmm. Interesting.

    Cavemen

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rossi
    Hmmm. Interesting.

    Cavemen
    This appears to be a variation on the old debate about red hair.

    The basic issue is that a few gene alleles, like the one for red hair, seem to be both very ancient and highly regional (i.e., outside Africa). These unusual alleles seem to contradict the "purest" version of the Out Of Africa theory.

    The two most popular explanatory hypotheses are:

    1) Occasional interbreeding between modern humans and archaic hominids did occur in some parts of the world, resulting in a small introduction of ancient regional gene alleles into the modern human gene pool. Either by accident, by design, or by human choice, such rare interbreeding did not result in any modern violations of the "daughters of Eve, sons of Noah" pattern in mtDNA and yDNA.

    2) The regional alleles are not nearly so ancient as they seem. Rather, they are recent but have been amplified by genetic drift or human choice, thereby giving the appearance of being more ancient.

    Time will tell as to which of these hypotheses is more accurate, but the important point is that even #1 does not and cannot seriously challenge the basic Out Of Africa theory because it cannot deny the obvious evidence of mtDNA and yDNA.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by lgmayka
      This appears to be a variation on the old debate about red hair.

      The basic issue is that a few gene alleles, like the one for red hair, seem to be both very ancient and highly regional (i.e., outside Africa). These unusual alleles seem to contradict the "purest" version of the Out Of Africa theory.

      The two most popular explanatory hypotheses are:

      1) Occasional interbreeding between modern humans and archaic hominids did occur in some parts of the world, resulting in a small introduction of ancient regional gene alleles into the modern human gene pool. Either by accident, by design, or by human choice, such rare interbreeding did not result in any modern violations of the "daughters of Eve, sons of Noah" pattern in mtDNA and yDNA.

      2) The regional alleles are not nearly so ancient as they seem. Rather, they are recent but have been amplified by genetic drift or human choice, thereby giving the appearance of being more ancient.

      Time will tell as to which of these hypotheses is more accurate, but the important point is that even #1 does not and cannot seriously challenge the basic Out Of Africa theory because it cannot deny the obvious evidence of mtDNA and yDNA.

      I think Templeton's study "Haplotype Trees and Modern Human Origins" is interesting.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Rossi
        I think Templeton's study "Haplotype Trees and Modern Human Origins" is interesting.
        I find it rather useless and self-aggrandizing. As I have mentioned, yDNA and mtDNA together have already answered the question definitively: There cannot possibly have been any significant interbreeding with earlier species, otherwise, such archaic forms would show up in yDNA or mtDNA or both.

        The remaining debate amounts to a quibble over a minor detail: Were modern and archaic forms so incompatible as to make successful interbreeding absolutely impossible (e.g., no offspring or only sterile offspring), or was interbreeding occasionally possible but extremely rare?

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