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  • Beginner needs advice

    HI Everyone,

    I need some help understanding my mtdna test results. I understand the haplogroup tells me the general location of my maternal ancestors, but what do all the mutations mean? Do they mean anything? I notice that some of you have extensive knowledge of papers and databases to learn more, so what do I do with these results? So far I've had no close matches in mitosearch. Thanks for any help.

    Danielle

    HVR1 Haplogroup H2a
    HVR1 differences from CRS 16111A, 16519C
    HVR2 differences from CRS 93G, 95C, 263G, 309.1C, 315

  • #2
    Newbie also

    I just got my Genographic results back last night and it says I am a Haplogroup B (16183c,16189c,16217c,16261t,16319a,16519c). My genealogy for my maternal line is Indian (Menominee, Sioux, Winnabago). My mom's paternal line is Norwegian, Irish, and French. We have found quite a few marriages of French/Indian marrying French/Indian. My dad's paternal line is Irish. I'm not sure how to read the results or what the Mitosearch is?
    Would one of my brother's doing this test come back with Haplogroup B also in addition to the paternal test?

    Thank you,
    Sherril

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    • #3
      Lizotte:

      as you probably know, H is the most common haplogroup in Europe (50% of the population). Subgroup H2 is present everywhere in Europe, being slightly more common in Eastern Europe. Regarding the mutations, I believe that 16519, 263, 309,315 are rather common and overall not very informative. Your other ones are more rare and thus potentially more interesting. Unfortunately, not very many people have tested HVR2, so that's why you have no matches so far (but you probably have matches on HVR1 alone).
      And since there are very many H people around (not me, though), if you don't get any further answer, try posting another thread (may be under the "mitosearch" category) titled "H2 mtdna", which will stimulate people's attention. By the way, to determine the fact that you were H2, they've probably tested stuff outside HVR1 and HVR2. May be you can ask them what exactly, this can also be informative.

      Slstewart:
      Haplogroup B is one of the 5 original Native American haplogroups (A,B,C,D,X), and is present throughout the continent. In North America, it is more common in the West and especially in the South West. Your mother passed her mtdna to all of her children, so your brother has the same; in turn she would have got hers from her mother. So these results don't say anything about your other (male) ancestors, just about the strictly female line. www.mitosearch.org is a database on which you can load your results, and then check if there is anybody else in there who has your own mtdna sequence, which may give information regarding the origin of your maternal line. You can upload your results to mitosearch by clicking a button on your ftdna page. As above, if you don't get any answer from more knowledgeable people, try posting a question with a catchier title, such as "Native American Sioux mtdna" or the like.

      cacio

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      • #4
        Thanks

        Thank you Cacio for your reply. I will use your suggestions. I was wondering how you came to know which of my mutations is common or not. Is this just from experience or do you have some kind of resource for looking this up?

        Danielle

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        • #5
          Lizotte:

          I am not a geneticist, I've just been following now and then these forums and related ones. The issue of 309-315 and 263 came up also in the article that defined the CRS, which states that these locations are rare polymorphisms of CRS (meaning that it is CRS which is different than most people). I have these mutations as well, by the way. 16519 I don't remember, but it has been discussed in this ftdna forum in the past.

          According to the article: "Disuniting uniformity: a pied-cladistic canvas of mdna haplogroup H in Eurasia" (the article which categorized the subgroups of haplogroup H), 16311 is also a mutational hotspot, having appeared independently in most subgroups of haplogroup H. While each of these mutations, on its own, may be a common mutation, of course the fact that you have this particular combination is informative.
          Other mutational hotspots are 73 and 16093, which almost makes you wonder whether there was a typo in your hvr2 results (you have 93).

          cacio

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          • #6
            Checked my sequence

            Cacio, you may not be a genticist, but you certainly are knowledgable. I looked at my sequence to check on the mutations to see about the typo thing. The sequence showed red letters at 16093 and 16095. Thanks agian.

            Danielle

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            • #7
              Thank you cacio for your fast reply. I was able to upload my results to mitosearch and found only one other person that was a close match not exact. His line was in South America.

              Thank you again,
              Sherril

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