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  • My turn to ask for understanding...

    Ok. Got 25 of 37 back this morning and I'm already confused. I read up on what I could in hope that I would have some understanding of my results and hopefully have a match or two somewhere. Of course neither came true. I've got no 12 or 25 marker matches from my personal page, and after uploading my info to ysearch the best that showed up was a distance of 7!
    I'm confused and still trying to understand this. Anyone want to help a guy out? My ID on ysearch is FU3VZ.

    Thanks in advance,
    --Brian--

  • #2
    Brian,

    Some of us are lucky. We have a rear Haplotype. I was in my surname project for two years before I got a match. When we do get a match it is very likely with someone we share a common ancestor with.

    In one of my projects I have people with 100's of 12 marker matches, 50 or more 25 marker matches. Only when they get to 37 or 67 markers do the matches even have a chance of being with someone we share a common ancestor with.

    Yes, we are the lucky ones!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by hachaliah
      Ok. Got 25 of 37 back this morning and I'm already confused. I read up on what I could in hope that I would have some understanding of my results and hopefully have a match or two somewhere. Of course neither came true. I've got no 12 or 25 marker matches from my personal page, and after uploading my info to ysearch the best that showed up was a distance of 7!
      I'm confused and still trying to understand this. Anyone want to help a guy out? My ID on ysearch is FU3VZ.

      Thanks in advance,
      --Brian--
      Brian, I would begin by going to this web address and using your markers to input into 37 marker Haplogroup predictor.
      https://home.comcast.net/~whitathey/predictorinstr.htm

      This will get you a prediction on your haplogroup type if you do not know, what it is now. A score between 30-50% is a fair haplogroup predictor above 50% is usally a pretty good indicator what your haplogroup type is. Once you have this it will allow you to look at group information for that Haplotype. It will allow you to open up doors to look at new information.
      Last edited by KerryODair; 1 August 2006, 01:09 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        I knew I'd forget something.
        They are saying I'm part of group Q.
        I'm considering a deep clade test to get more specific, but I think I need to make sense of what I've got first!

        Comment


        • #5
          Go to this web address and it will talk about Q haplogroup types and papers associated with that haplogroup.

          http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpQ.html

          It still worth testing with the predictor with your 25 markers. When you get your 37 markers do it again. I am an e3b1, when I first did a predictor test I had strong numbers for the q haplogroup. The more markers the better for the predictor.

          Comment


          • #6
            hachaliah:

            actually the best you have in ysearch is a distance of 2 out of 12 markers compared (Uzbekistan) and a 3 out of 12 (Pakistan). All are listed as Q. If you know your ethnic origin, may be somebody may be able to suggest papers on the distribution of your haplogroup in the area.

            cacio

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            • #7
              In addition to Asia and Eastern Europe, Haplogroup Q is also found in Nordic countries (like Sweden) and at low levels throughout continental Europe.

              Also, the Tambets paper is a good look at some Q frequencies.

              http://evolutsioon.ut.ee/publications/Tambets2004.pdf
              Last edited by vineviz; 1 August 2006, 01:37 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hachaliah
                I knew I'd forget something.
                They are saying I'm part of group Q.
                I'm considering a deep clade test to get more specific, but I think I need to make sense of what I've got first!
                Also go to this web address to find world and european maps showing where haplotypes reside in the world.

                http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~mcdonald/Wo...groupsMaps.pdf

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by hachaliah
                  They are saying I'm part of group Q.
                  I'm considering a deep clade test to get more specific, but I think I need to make sense of what I've got first!
                  For an unusual haplogroup like Q, the question I like to ask is, How did it get here from wherever it originated?

                  As references may tell you, Q is ordinarily associated with central Asia, and with Native Americans who are believed to have originated in central Asia before crossing Beringia. So the real question is, How did central Asians end up in Europe? Here are some possibilities:

                  1) When Khazaria fell from power, the Khazar nobility (who had converted to Judaism centuries before) assimilated into the larger European Jewish community. Levy-Coffman's paper actually has a heading entitled, "The Khazars and the Smoking Gun of Haplogroup Q":

                  http://www.jogg.info/11/coffman.pdf

                  2) In that same paper, she quotes expert David Faux in regard to Q among Scandinavians and Shetland Islanders:
                  ---
                  The best evidence we have to date is that, although not investigated scientifically, that Q and K* arrived with R1a from the same population source in the Altai region of Russian Siberia. It is likely that what we are seeing with Q and K are very rare Scandinavian haplogroups whose origins were long ago in Asia.
                  ---

                  From Scandinavia, of course, Q could then spread to England via the Viking invasions.

                  3) Q appears among Tatars, and hence was brought into Europe when Poland-Lithuania invited Tatar warriors to settle on its lands after the Tatars' khanates fell from power. Many, perhaps most, Tatars eventually adopted Christianity and assimilated into the larger Polish-Lithuanian society, and from there could have migrated farther west.

                  4) Q among Hungarians is presumed to originate from the proto-Magyars, who arrived from central Asia and apparently imposed their language on a much larger indigenous population.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lgmayka
                    For an unusual haplogroup like Q, the question I like to ask is, How did it get here from wherever it originated?

                    As references may tell you, Q is ordinarily associated with central Asia, and with Native Americans who are believed to have originated in central Asia before crossing Beringia. So the real question is, How did central Asians end up in Europe? Here are some possibilities
                    Also, given that the sample was presumably collected in America, sublclade testing might shed some light on whether this particular Q is actually North American (i.e. Native American). This would be the simplest explanation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Riddle me this...

                      Hi again.
                      The rest of my 37 marker results came in just a few minutes ago. I'm really kind of confused and even a little bit disheartened at the results. Let me go into a little detail to give you all a better picture. My surname is Miller. Seems pretty straightforward where the name originated. My haplogroup is designated as Q (the subclade test is in process). I followed the advice from earlier posts and ran the predictor just now with all 37 markers... Here's what I found:
                      http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...torresults.jpg

                      It looks like the odds are in favor of Q...

                      Matches from FTDNA = zilch
                      Matches from Ysearch = nada
                      Matches from Ybase = goose egg

                      I searched all kinds of criteria and came up with no significant ties to anyone. Not one even kinda-sorta-maybe tie. Of course I am putting into consideration that there may have been an indescretion or something to that extent, but it is still a bummer to show a whole lot of nothing. So, any ideas or suggestions? Also, does anyone know of any specific Q haplogroup articles? Maybe something less straight-up scientific?

                      Thanks for hearing me out. Ugh.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        hachaliah:

                        Miller is common both among anglo-saxons and among Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe. (It means the same in both). Which one applies to you?

                        The lack of matches is actually a pretty common thing. Simply, very few people have tested outside the usual Anglo-Saxon/European gruops, so unless one is R1b or I1a, matches are extremely rare.

                        cacio

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Miller is common both among anglo-saxons and among Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe.
                          Really? I had no idea that was the case. Do you have any information about the Ashkenazi Jews that I might research? I had always assumed that my heritage was Anglo-Saxon... At least as far as my physical traits go!

                          Thanks for the tip.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You may want to join the Haplogroup Q project that just started last week:

                            http://www.familytreedna.com/public/yDNA_Q/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              hachaliah:

                              I don't know much about the Ashkenazi Jews, but I think I heard that Miller is the second most common family name among the ones living in the US (after Cohen and derivatives). I believe the name is also present among the Polish (not necessarily Jewish). As a common profession name, there are likely going to be hundreds of different lineages. If you are not aware of any Jewish/Polish connection, then that's not your ancestry. Ashkenazi Jews came to the US in the late XIX - XX century, so you'd know.

                              Besides, it's not that Q is frequent among Jewish people. It's really Central Asiatic/Siberian. It presumably came to Europe during the various barbaric invasions, and left its trace in Northern and Eastern Europe. I believe it's present in Skandinavia, from which it may have reached the UK with the Vikings.

                              cacio

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