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understanding locations of matches

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  • understanding locations of matches

    A miss at 391 and 385b on a 12 marker test tells what as far a MRCA.

  • #2
    Originally posted by bing
    A miss at 391 and 385b on a 12 marker test tells what as far a MRCA.
    To be honest, 12-markers do not reveal much. So the answer is you probably have no MRCA worth speaking of. You would most likely have to go back literally many thousands of years to find a common link.

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    • #3
      Thank you sir, I have recently upgraded to a 37, results not in. Do the locations of the misses mean anything.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bing
        Thank you sir, I have recently upgraded to a 37, results not in. Do the locations of the misses mean anything.
        I wish I could give you a difinative answer there. Some markers can give a clue to what your haplogroup is. Some can also give indications regarding possible SNP's in deep clade testing. But as far as a specific meaning, no.

        If it is a fast mutating marker it could still be possible a relation exisits and it was just a random mutation. Mismatches on slow movers increase the likelyhood of no relation.

        Markers in and of themselves really have no specific meaning I have ever heard of. Not saying that will not change in the future as we learn more.

        Damn, I should be a politician

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        • #5
          Again let me thank you for the info. My haplogroup is R1b1. And yes you may have a political future.
          Stephen Bingham
          Southeast KY

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          • #6
            If you differ from another person by, say, 1 repeat on a marker, by testing other family members, you may be able to determine which ancestor had the original mutation that is reflected in your haplotype. That is, if you cared one way or the other. If your first cousin has the same sequence as you, then the mutation occurred with your grandfather or earlier. If your first cousin has a sequence that is one repeat different from you but is the same as other cousins in your line, then either your father or you had the mutation.

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