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  • #16
    Wouldn't the Chinese bear the same haplogroup as some of the Native Americans since Native Americans were Asians before they walked over to Alaska?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by R1b1c
      Wouldn't the Chinese bear the same haplogroup as some of the Native Americans since Native Americans were Asians before they walked over to Alaska?
      The generally recognized Native American haplogroups are:

      yDNA: C and Q
      mtDNA: A, B, C, D, and X

      According to these haplogroup maps, mtDNA Hg A, B, and D are common in China:

      http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~mcdonald/Wo...groupsMaps.pdf

      The other mentioned haplogroups are not common in China, but are common in northeast and/or central Asia.

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      • #18
        The generally recognized Native American haplogroups are:

        yDNA: C and Q
        mtDNA: A, B, C, D, and X

        According to these haplogroup maps, mtDNA Hg A, B, and D are common in China
        Uhm...okay...so you basically reconfirmed my first statement. And given the aforementioned, how do you expect to find the idea of a [edited] visit to Cherokee, NC in the 1400s from China?

        The haplogroups of Asians and Native Americans are not indifferent...

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        • #19
          (Biting my tongue on some of the offensive things in this thread---- )

          However, keeping on topic, here is a link to "The Mystery of Zheng He and America"

          http://www.asiawind.com/zhenghe/

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          • #20
            Originally posted by R1b1c
            And given the aforementioned, how do you expect to find the idea of a Hong-Kong-Ching-Chong visit to Cherokee, NC in the 1400s from China?
            The predominant yDNA haplogroup in China is O, and a distant second is K. So finding either yDNA Hg O or K among apparent Native Americans would be significant.

            Similarly, mtDNA haplogroups M and F are common in China. Finding either of these among apparent Native Americans would be significant.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Pleroma
              However, keeping on topic, here is a link to "The Mystery of Zheng He and America"

              http://www.asiawind.com/zhenghe/
              Here is another site:

              http://www.1421.tv/

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              • #22
                Thanks Igmayka! What an interesting site! I really like how they are so open and welcoming of input, (not that I personally would be of any help.) Also the paintings by Mike Boss are beautiful.

                The entire thing has given me a lot to think about.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by R2-D2
                  Think before you speak. I did. My post started out much nastier. There are First Nations people here on FTDNA.
                  Hello From an Enrolled First Nation Person,

                  When Europeans first encountered we Cherokees in the 1600's and early 1700's, they were convinced that we were the Lost Tribe of Israel. They made convincing arguments for their position. Reference: John Adair "Out of the Flame" 1776- London. We aren't. Cherokees are just that; Cherokees. Our own oldest stories tell of coming to our Land after a long sea voyage from the south. Still others tell of our coming from the stars...the Pleiades. Who's to say? Chinese shipwrecked off the Carolina coast? Historically we would have welcomed any stranger who came in peace. Had they stayed long enough and proven trustworthy, they would have been "eligible" to join the Long Hair Clan and become part of the larger Tribe. However, I am not aware of any "chinese" DNA having turned up in documented Cherokee People. What is found, however, is a fair amount of European DNA in Cherokee lines due to our historic associations with the Europeans since the early 1600s.
                  Respectfully,
                  Bob

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                  • #24
                    R2-D2...by all means, let 'er rip, dude! I won't cry or whine over any attack you desire to hold back from! "Hong Kong Ching Chong" is offensive to any culture? How so?

                    "Ching" and "Chong" are perfectly normal Chinese names and they rhyme with "Hong Kong" a current territory of China...I thought it was catchy! Oh...and I can just see the entire Cherokee Nation taking offense to my non-intended, aparently offensive "Hong Kong Ching Chong" reference since their ancestors came from China. If you people are so offended by that, then I must laugh! Go ahead and call me "Yankee Spankee" and we'll call it even!

                    All I was trying to say was that I found it difficult to prove that Joe-Chinaman (I am not allowed to use a Chinese name like "Ching" or "Chong") landed on the Atlantic coast. If I were a gambling man, I would check the Pacific coastal Native-American tribes for such Y-DNA types from China as it is a lot closer to China than the Carolina coast...especially without the use of the Panama Canal. But then again, Native-Americans were Asian before they were Americans...

                    Good luck and try to chill a bit!

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                    • #25
                      R1b1c,
                      I think the reason people have got insulted is because these terms are not positive ones, they sound "funny" to some people therefore you could say that is making fun of that group, let's face it that's where these comments have come-from a desire to make fun of people in some way. I could say I was a "Limey" or a "Pommie" but why would I want to pull myself down? These terms have come from people making fun of the English and it's the same with other cultures. I'm sure you had no intention of deliberately being offensive, but I would say to everyone on here just go easy and be sensitive to other users feelings!

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                      • #26
                        I think the reason people have got insulted is because these terms are not positive ones, they sound "funny" to some people therefore you could say that is making fun of that group
                        Well I think that some people just need a reason to gripe over anything or anyone they can get their mitts on. I simply created a clever rhyme and not some sort of cultural or racial slur, nor was I trying to be "funny"! I cannot even believe such claims of pain and suffering...whatever! I am spent on this thread.

                        By the way (sticking to the topic), I still do not believe that the most 'royal, majestic, powerful and beautiful' (does that THAT make you feel better?) ancient Asian people ever reached the Carolinian shores...

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                        • #27
                          [QUOTE=R1b1c] I cannot even believe such claims of pain and suffering...whatever! I am spent on this thread.

                          QUOTE]
                          I was merely trying to speak for both sides of this arguement...and I did say that I was sure you weren't being deliberately offensive. I also said EVERYONE should be careful what they say, but hey if you want to take it as a gripe go ahead.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by R1b1c
                            R2-D2...by all means, let 'er rip, dude! I won't cry or whine over any attack you desire to hold back from! "Hong Kong Ching Chong" is offensive to any culture? How so?

                            "Ching" and "Chong" are perfectly normal Chinese names and they rhyme with "Hong Kong" a current territory of China...I thought it was catchy! Oh...and I can just see the entire Cherokee Nation taking offense to my non-intended, aparently offensive "Hong Kong Ching Chong" reference since their ancestors came from China. If you people are so offended by that, then I must laugh! Go ahead and call me "Yankee Spankee" and we'll call it even!

                            All I was trying to say was that I found it difficult to prove that Joe-Chinaman (I am not allowed to use a Chinese name like "Ching" or "Chong") landed on the Atlantic coast. If I were a gambling man, I would check the Pacific coastal Native-American tribes for such Y-DNA types from China as it is a lot closer to China than the Carolina coast...especially without the use of the Panama Canal. But then again, Native-Americans were Asian before they were Americans...

                            Good luck and try to chill a bit!
                            Calling you names would not do anyone any good. The language you used is a failed attempt to make you feel better about yourself at the expense of others. (There is not a human on earth that has not been guilty of this at least once.) The truth is that you lose even bigger than those who would be offended by your disrespectful language----and the saddest part is, that I am doubtful that you will ever be able to accept that and change it. But on second thought, I can always have hope for you.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Calling you names would not do anyone any good. The language you used is a failed attempt to make you feel better about yourself at the expense of others. (There is not a human on earth that has not been guilty of this at least once.) The truth is that you lose even bigger than those who would be offended by your disrespectful language----and the saddest part is, that I am doubtful that you will ever be able to accept that and change it. But on second thought, I can always have hope for you.
                              "Hong Kong Ching Chong" is NOT "disrespectful language"! It is the same as "Crocadile Dundee" from Oz, "Pilgrim Paul" from the Mayflower or "Frontier Fred" from the wilderness (me)...nothing more than a little geography mixed in with a popular name that either rhymes or has a catchy tone. I was belittling no-one and you just need to get over yourself and stop being such a drama queen/king/etc.! "But on second thought, I can always have hope" that you will not suffer from a stroke or heart-attack over nothing some day. I am truly worried over your health...

                              I believe that I did read an account of an Asian vessel that landed off the Pacific coast and explored a little before returning to its origin. That was many years ago...cannot recall the name of that explorer.

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                              • #30
                                Although lively debate is always encouraged, please make sure to limit your discussion to topics related to genetic genealogy or we will have to close this thread. Thanks!

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