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DNA Tribes(Cherokee)?

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  • DNA Tribes(Cherokee)?

    Got my results back and was surprised to see what it showed. First off we have Native American (Southeastern Tribes) on a couple of maternal lines and Black Dutch on both maternal and paternal. DNA Print showed 92% Indo-European and 8% East-Asian.
    DNA Tribes Global Match was in this order: Pallar (India) 20, Germany 10.9, Albanian 8.5, Lombardia (Italy)7.9, Norwegian 7.8, Japanese 7.7, Caucasian 7.5, Asian (Australia) 7.3, and more Asian, Turkish, Flemish, and Japanese in the 6 and 5 range. Continent Match (highest score possible is 5) was Asia Minor 4.4, South Asian 3.8, East Asian 2.3, European 1.8, Arabian 1.4, Malay Archipelago (Malaysia) 1.3, North African 1.1, North Indian 0.9, Latin American 0.2.
    Have heard theories of Black Dutch sometimes being used by Romanian Gypsies who moved to the U.S. They originated in India and then went west to Romania and then across Europe. Have a genealogy paper trail with no Asian ancestors for over 15 generations.
    Is it possible that the Asian could actually be Native American? Found that DNA Tribes does not have Cherokee or other southeast tribes in their data base (except for Lumbee).

  • #2
    Pardon my ignorance, but what is or who are "Black Dutch"? I've never heard of that group.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Black Dutch
      Is it possible that the Asian could actually be Native American?
      Yes, because Native Americans came from northeast and central Asia.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Stevo
        Pardon my ignorance, but what is or who are "Black Dutch"? I've never heard of that group.
        Black Dutch is mainly on of two things:
        1) Pennsylvania Germans that used the term to explain their dark complexion, hair and eyes. Most came from the Palatine area of Germany and their origins are unclear but some believe they are Roma (Gypsies).
        2) People of Native American descent usually of unknown tribal affiliation [In the mid 1800's thru the 1950's it was more acceptable to claim Black Dutch then to say you were part Indian] A lot of Cherokee's used this term.

        There are also several other definitions for Black Dutch but these two are the most common.

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        • #5
          Also...

          Originally posted by Stevo
          Pardon my ignorance, but what is or who are "Black Dutch"? I've never heard of that group.

          a lot of times during 1800's light complected or mixed blacks or Indians
          would marry white women and pass themselves off as white - I believe
          the term was used in that situation as well.

          and the term Black Dutch should not be confused with the terms
          Yellow Dutch or Black Irish.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Stevo
            Pardon my ignorance, but what is or who are "Black Dutch"? I've never heard of that group.
            Ramapo Mountain People or Ramapough Indians, are also called Black Dutch. This is more true when they leave the Ramapo Mountain area (NJ-NY border) than when they are in this location. They are the descendants of free Mulattos from Dutch farms in the Hudson Valley who moved to the mountains, where they may have mixed with some remnant Indians, who probably would have been the Munsee group of Lenape (Lenni-Lenape or Delaware) Indians, definitely Algonquian speaking Indians of the East Coast. They may have been joined by some Tuscarora (Southern Iroquoians related to the Cherokee) as they fled north after the Tuscarora War. Since they are mainly a mixture of Dutch and Black, the term Black Dutch would fit them. The two main names are Van Dunk (Van Donck) and De Freese (DeFries).

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            • #7
              Thanks, everyone. Now I know. Interesting stuff.

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              • #8
                Black Dutch website

                Here is link to a Black Dutch website that explains in detail the 8 different groups of people often referred to as Black Dutch:

                http://www.geocities.com/mikenassau/BlackDutch.htm

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pleroma
                  Here is link to a Black Dutch website that explains in detail the 8 different groups of people often referred to as Black Dutch:

                  http://www.geocities.com/mikenassau/BlackDutch.htm
                  Interesting site, but there is some wild stuff there. I take most of it with a huge grain of salt.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Stevo
                    I take most of it with a huge grain of salt.
                    I prefer sugar. Much more palatable.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DMac
                      I prefer sugar. Much more palatable.
                      Sugar sounds good. You need a big gulp of something to swallow some of the stuff on that web site.

                      Actually, vodka might be best.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stevo
                        Sugar sounds good. You need a big gulp of something to swallow some of the stuff on that web site.

                        Actually, vodka might be best.
                        Where in Fred's town do you live? I'll be right up with glass in hand.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DMac
                          I prefer sugar. Much more palatable.
                          After spending enough time on the internet you collect a large variety of spices to make things palatable.

                          The explanation of the Ramapo area of New Jersey / New York is accurate though.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GvdM
                            After spending enough time on the internet you collect a large variety of spices to make things palatable.
                            Yep, but I like Stevo's idea better. I just wonder how many bottles of that Russian vodka his wife was able to smuggle back into the States?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DMac
                              Where in Fred's town do you live? I'll be right up with glass in hand.
                              With Stormfronters watching us, I wonder if I should say?

                              I actually live in Stafford County, right off 17. We just bought a house in Spotsylvania County, though. We close on July 12, God willing, so we'll be moving soon but not too far down the road.

                              Originally posted by DMac
                              Yep, but I like Stevo's idea better. I just wonder how many bottles of that Russian vodka his wife was able to smuggle back into the States?
                              She brought back exactly two bottles.

                              One is Soyuz Victan Russian vodka, which is made not only with grain but also with birch bark, which makes it the smoothest vodka in the world and also virtually headache free.

                              The other is Nemiroff Ukrainian vodka, медова с перцем, which means "honey with peppers." It is a Ukrainian pepper vodka. It doesn't look like vodka because it is honey colored. That one I am saving for the holidays.
                              Last edited by Stevo; 3 July 2006, 12:18 PM.

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