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  • Thoughts About 16519??

    16519C is seen on trade routes,
    Halgason’s Study
    and it is a hot spot in many haplogroups such as I, X, T, K, U3, and U4.
    16519T is seen in haplogroups such as U5, J, and T
    Haplogroup group H was evenly split between 16519C and T.
    Helgason A, Sigurðardóttir S, Gulcher JR, Ward R, Stefánsson
    K (2000) mtDNA and the origin of the Icelanders: deciphering
    signals of recent population history. Am J Hum Genet 66:999-
    1016.

    The L1c people from Kikuyu (Kenya) might have some 519 people but the other article did not say if they are T or C.

  • #2
    16519c

    See the article in the Journal of Genetic Genealogy by Ann Turner:
    http://www.jogg.info/12/SatiableCuriosityHTML.htm

    By the way, nobody has a "hint of K." Everybody has ONE mtDNA haplgroup. Men also have ONE Y-DNA haplogroup.

    Bill Hurst

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    • #3
      Hmms H1 samples 19/21 16519C (90%)

      Interesting article: The Medical Implications of Complete Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing http://www.jogg.info/12/Logan.pdf

      Comment


      • #4
        I am an H 16519C. I live in Florida. My great great great great grandmother was from Virginia/North Carolina. Her fathers surname originated from Cornwall. I didn't know if her mom was also English or Native American. Since the test came back as H, I now know the mother was most likely also from Cornwall, England.
        Is H 16519C found in Cornwall, England? Is Cornwall considered a 'trade spot'/'trade route'? I read that Phoenicians liked the tin from that area. Maybe there is Phoenician mixed in in my line?
        My mom has very wild curly dark hair & eyes. Someday I'll like to get the 'autosomal' test done. Maybe there is some American Indian there somewhere. Or gypsy? I read the thread about English gypsies. She thinks I'm part Mongolian or Hun on my fathers side.
        Last edited by rainbow; 28 June 2006, 07:00 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bill Hurst
          See the article in the Journal of Genetic Genealogy by Ann Turner:
          http://www.jogg.info/12/SatiableCuriosityHTML.htm

          By the way, nobody has a "hint of K." Everybody has ONE mtDNA haplgroup. Men also have ONE Y-DNA haplogroup.

          Bill Hurst

          I do not have any matches with my HVR-1 results (mostly because of strange mutations like 16224C, 16311C, 16519C, 073G, 263G, 315.1C.). They looked at my SNPs for the mtDNA, and decided to snip out one motif for my assignment (I asked the lab people). The people who do match my HVR-2 region have three different HVR-1 mutation than I do, and I have three different HVR-1 mutations than they do for a total of six different mutations. I do match with my own results in some data banks. So, I examined the motifs.

          sqY1 + sqY2 vs sq(Y1+Y2) = sqY1 + sqY2 + 2Y1Y2
          where 2Y1Y2 = overlap term

          I have photographs of and documentation on my great grandmother. I do not think she is a new speices of human. She just does not have any matches to her HVR-1 region which would match what we already know.

          Also, my Y haplogroup SNPs are still in testing. The last time I checked, they were getting a lot of negative results even thou they are sure that it is R1b1c something.

          At least I have some motifs in my haplotypes. And they do not have to give me the * for "who knows?" Many of the * people I have looked have mutations to are from the Anderson results. Maybe, my 28 HVR mutations are all random, and I am really H*(just a joke). It is just strange that I have two established motifs in my HVR.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GregKiroKH
            I do not have any matches with my HVR-1 results (mostly because of strange mutations like 16224C, 16311C, 16519C, 073G, 263G, 315.1C.). They looked at my SNPs for the mtDNA, and decided to snip out one motif for my assignment (I asked the lab people). The people who do match my HVR-2 region have three different HVR-1 mutation than I do, and I have three different HVR-1 mutations than they do for a total of six different mutations. I do match with my own results in some data banks. So, I examined the motifs.

            ..................

            At least I have some motifs in my haplotypes. And they do not have to give me the * for "who knows?" Many of the * people I have looked have mutations to are from the Anderson results. Maybe, my 28 HVR mutations are all random, and I am really H*(just a joke). It is just strange that I have two established motifs in my HVR.
            Gregory, it might help if you would upload your results to MitoSearch and tell us where to look. You list all six of the basic K HVR mutations, then you say you have 28.

            Bill Hurst

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bill Hurst
              Gregory, it might help if you would upload your results to MitoSearch and tell us where to look. You list all six of the basic K HVR mutations, then you say you have 28.

              Bill Hurst
              The first thing I did in Jan 06 was to upload my HVR data. There were no matches. When I snipped out parts, then I had matches. That is when I found out about the six basic K HVR mutations since I have them all. I had to take away a bunch of mutations to find matches in my assigned haplogroup. (That was one reason, I asked the lab how I received my assignment.) I was hoping to find out how many mutations I had from the genetic eve, but I could not find her data. It is obvious that many of my mutations did not change to the Anderson values while new mutations like 224 happened. The other people and I who have HVR-2 matches (with me) have many mutations from the standard L1c tribes. I am the only one with the six basic K mutations (search 2005). However, there are others who have 224 and a few others who have some K (search 2005) mutations. All of this seems to agree with my genealogy if not ideal genetics. Of course, in graduate school I took two years of biochemical engineering, and I find puzzles to be more fun than established results.

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              • #8
                I was still wondering why American L1c people have 16519c. I am updating my notes on this.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The root type for L1c is the following:

                  HVR-I: 16129–16187–16189–16223–16278–16294–16311–16360

                  HVR-II: (073–151–152–182–186A–189C–195–2 47–263–297–316)

                  A new study classified L1c1b with the following:

                  HVR - I: add 16293

                  HVR - II: add (195–297)

                  The 519C mutation is common, Halgason’s Study, and it is a hot spot in many haplogroups such as I, X, T, K, U3, and U4. 16519T is seen in haplogroups such as U5, J, and T. Haplogroup group H was evenly split between 16519C and T. It is also seen in American L1c.

                  Specific to my HVR-I region:

                  16224C is found in haplogroup K.

                  Also, T16086C ( http://www.isogg.org/ for HVR-1 AF254446) is a Neanderthal marker as is C16223T

                  16038G is seen in Orcadian people, Mongolian people, and American people as of 1998.


                  Originally posted by GregKiroKH2
                  I was still wondering why American L1c people have 16519c. I am updating my notes on this.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Edit Mistake for HVR-II for L1c1b

                    I made a mistake. It should read lose 195-297 not add 195-297. The root type for L1c1b already has 195-297. (Disagreements and mistakes are so popular, I know)

                    A new study classified L1c1b with the following:

                    HVR - II: lose (195–297) from L1c root type

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      HVR-II Hot Spots related to HVR-I Hot Spots?

                      198T is found in another L1c group besides L1b1c:

                      L1c HVR-II: (073–151–152–182–186A–189C–195–2 47–263–297–316)

                      198T is L1c1c

                      263T, 315.1C is a unique CRS mutation (Andrews et al, 1999) (Parsons et al. 2001)

                      522-, 523- (highly variable in many world haplogroups such as A, H, J, K, X and U and so on and so forth)

                      I have no idea if these hot spots are related.

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                      • #12
                        Don't forget Hg N*. I have 16519C also

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                        • #13
                          People just do not talk about 16223 too much now a days. Are people still calling it a Neanderthal marker?

                          Originally posted by Villicus
                          Don't forget Hg N*. I have 16519C also
                          The most variable sites (with 19 or more changes each) observed included 16093, 16129, 16189, 16311, 16362, 16519, 146, 150, 152, 189, and 195. These rapidly changing sites are consistent with other published analyses. Only 34 SNPs are needed to identify all clusters containing 10 or more individuals in the African American data set. The results show that the African American SWGDAM mtDNA data set contains variation consistent with that described in continental African populations. Thirteen of the 18 haplogroups previously observed in African populations were observed and include: L1a, L1b, L1c, L2a, L2b, L2c, L3b, L3d, L3e1, L3e2, L3e3, L3e4 and L3f. Haplogroup L2a is the most commonly observed cluster (18.8%) in the African American data set. The next most common haplogroups in the African American data set include the clusters L1c (11.0%), L1b (9.1%), L3e2 (9.0%) and L3b (8.1%). Approximately 8% of the haplogroups observed within African Americans were common in European Caucasians or East Asians; these were H (n = 32), J (n = 4), K (n = 5), T (n = 2), U5 (n = 6), U6 (n = 9 also known from North Africa), A (n = 12), B (n = 7), C (n = 4), and M (n = 16), respectively. The European Caucasian and East Asian haplogroups are expected due to admixture between individuals with recent ancestry in Western Eurasia and sub-Saharan Africa. 10 March 2005, Pages 169-179

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                          • #14
                            I'm Hg L3, 16519c was included in my results.

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                            • #15
                              GregKiroKH2:

                              the hotspots (16519, 309.1 and 315.1, deletions around 522) are not related to each other, they can happen in any combination in any haplogroup.

                              And I had never heard of 16223 as a neanderthal marker. 16233 is the ancestral state. It is in the Western Eurasian lineages that 16233 mutated.

                              Neanderthals must have separated from modern humans around 400-500K years ago, which in evolutionary terms is a small time. The vast majority of their mtdna is the same as that of modern humans.

                              Btw, interesting quote about African American mtdna. The few A,B,C and some of the M are Native American, not Western Eurasian. Some African Americans married Native Americans.

                              cacio

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