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genealogy (&DNA) MOOC

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  • genealogy (&DNA) MOOC

    Genealogy: Researching Your Family Tree
    "This free online course will help you develop an understanding of basic genealogy techniques and how to communicate your family history. We will consider how to effectively find and analyse sources and explore the potential of DNA testing as applied to genealogy. We’ll help you add historical context to your family history and discuss how to record and communicate research findings in a clear fashion. The course is primarily designed for people at beginner to intermediate level."

    Lots more information on the page about what it will cover. Scroll down.

    I completed a forensics MOOC from the University of Strathclyde, also on the FutureLearn platform, and it was excellent.
    Last edited by abuelita; 15 March 2018, 09:12 PM.

  • #2
    from the syllabus:

    What topics will you cover?
    -A consideration of the differences between primary, derived primary and secondary sources.
    -An understanding of the importance of knowing who made a document and why and how they were created.
    -Lateral ways to approach research including the FAN/cluster technique and mind mapping.
    -Primary source databases including searching techniques to deal with name change or spelling differences; these include the use of wildcards.
    -An introduction to main source types including civil, church, census and military records to give a sense of the typical type of data these records contain and how to use them.
    -Review the content of major international and selected local and specialised databases and consider ways to evaluate databases.
    -The principles of the Genealogical Proof Standard including how to establish proof and how to evaluate evidence.
    -The use of DNA testing in genealogical research with a focus on Y-testing techniques.
    -An exploration of secondary and primary sources which provide historic and social context, considering their quality and how to find them.
    -The importance of providing evidence of the sources used in family history research and an exploration of the various systems of referencing in use.
    -A consideration of tools used to store, track and analyse genealogical data; various types of family trees and reports including paper based resources, software programs and online tools.
    -What are the best ways to begin writing a family history?
    -Ways to protect and preserve physical records and digital data.

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    • #3
      It appears that only a tiny portion of the course is (possibly) relevant in the context of FTDNA.

      Why posting here?

      Mr. W.

      P.S.
      Actually, comparing the number of hours and topics covered, I would say that the genetic genealogy component cannot be more than negligible. One would learn significantly more by reading articles from The Family Tree DNA Learning Center (link at the top of this page).
      Last edited by dna; 15 March 2018, 09:48 PM. Reason: Added P.S.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dna View Post
        It appears that only a tiny portion of the course is (possibly) relevant in the context of FTDNA.

        Why posting here?
        Because the title of this subforum is "DNA and Genealogy for Beginners" and the problem I have with DNA "matches" is the absence of genealogical research. Perhaps I'm alone, but it seems to me that one needs that skill to make sense of individual DNA relationships.

        I have found that the information available at the "The Family Tree DNA Learning Center", though I often refer to it, and have a piece open in another tab right now,
        1)does not address this problem
        2)is rather sparse. Not inaccurate, just inadequate.
        For amateurs interested in DIY genetics, I generally recommend Rosie Redfield's lectures - especially the 16 in "Useful Genetics" part one, section six, "Personal Genomics", though they're aging a bit.

        I will not post again. (disclosure: I am an anthropological geneticist who formerly taught both biological anthropology and population genetics, so I tend to find these forums frustrating in any case.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by abuelita View Post
          Because the title of this subforum is "DNA and Genealogy for Beginners" and the problem I have with DNA "matches" is the absence of genealogical research. Perhaps I'm alone, but it seems to me that one needs that skill to make sense of individual DNA relationships.

          I have found that the information available at the "The Family Tree DNA Learning Center", though I often refer to it, and have a piece open in another tab right now,
          1)does not address this problem
          2)is rather sparse. Not inaccurate, just inadequate.
          For amateurs interested in DIY genetics, I generally recommend Rosie Redfield's lectures - especially the 16 in "Useful Genetics" part one, section six, "Personal Genomics", though they're aging a bit.

          I will not post again. (disclosure: I am an anthropological geneticist who formerly taught both biological anthropology and population genetics, so I tend to find these forums frustrating in any case.)
          My apologies, your post did not include any introduction...

          A word or two would have been extremely helpful. I myself redirect users here to genealogical research.

          Mr. W.

          Comment


          • #6
            I had / have a different interpretation of this subforum name...

            "DNA and Genealogy" for beginners

            and only after your today post I can see that if could be read

            "DNA" "and" "Genealogy" for beginners


            Mr. W.

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