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  • Sun Sensitivity-Test for?

    Is there a test to gauge your skin and eyes' sun sensitivity? Or to gauge which rays you are sensitive too? All bright radiating lights singe me a little.-even light bulbs and the computer screen (aches my eyes)I'm not complaining-I'm glad I burn-I'm suppossed to-I guess.But I didn't always,so maybe it's the hole in ozone layer or something.Yep, as I kid I'd play all day outside,and didn't feel the sun stinging,but now I can't go out without my sunscreen,sunglasses,and a scarf,to keep the sun from stinging my scalp.I do enjoy the warm weather and don't mind the heat,but when sunscreen's on sale I try and stock up. This ain't particularly a genetic ancestry thing,but if you get your whole genome tested ,they'll know if you have bright light sensitivity,in you genes somewhere.On one hand it can be assumed,but I like everything confirmed and explained-I like to tell people I got "Proof"-what's more believable than that? Since I didn't burn as a kid,but do now, do you think I actually turned Whiter? Is that even possible? It's probably the Ozone hole.

  • #2
    I've always burned pretty easily: ruddy complexion, blue eyes. Bright sunlight also gives me headaches. I enjoy gray, cloudy days (not all the time, however!) and cool weather.

    The place that has the honor of being the scene of the worst sunburn of my entire life is Galveston, Texas.

    Yep. I was physically sick as a dog after a day at the beach in Galveston. Burnt to a crisp. Red like one of grandma's homegrown tomatoes.

    I may pay for it someday with a case of melanoma.

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    • #3
      I got the worst sunburn of my entire life in San Diego California, last year.
      I was shocked by the power of the sunlight down there. I swear that in Sicily neither you can get all that sun

      Shame on you Amerrricans!!!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by F.E.C.
        I got the worst sunburn of my entire life in San Diego California, last year.
        I burned my arm there too, and I was mainly sitting in a car with closed windows! Although I also spent some time in their zoo. Really felt sorry for the polar bears there. Luckily they had at least a pool and a water fall.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by F.E.C.
          I got the worst sunburn of my entire life in San Diego California, last year.
          I was shocked by the power of the sunlight down there. I swear that in Sicily neither you can get all that sun

          Shame on you Amerrricans!!!
          Ever been in the tropics?

          The sun is incredible there, and the colors seem brighter and more vivid.

          I spent some time in the Dominican Republic. There, however, I was smart enough not to stay out in the sun too long. Beautiful place.

          I also went over to Port au Prince, Haiti, on the other side of the island. Terrible poverty. I was glad to get back to Santo Domingo.

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          • #6
            Two memorable sunburns for me are:

            1. When I was a kid in Minnesota. I was painting a boat (white) next to a lake and was only wearing a pair of cut-offs. I guess the reflection from the paint and the water just made it worse.

            2. In the military, I had a day off after twenty-on 18 hour work days. I fell asleep in the sun at the beach in Haifa, Israel.

            I was one crispy critter...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Piobaireachd

              2. In the military, I had a day off after twenty-on 18 hour work days. I fell asleep in the sun at the beach in Haifa, Israel.
              That reminds me that also Lapland sun is strong in the spring when there's still snow on the ground. In the military, we had two weeks training in Lapland in April. I fell asleep on a utility box of a cannon, when I woke up, my ear was burnt.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Eki
                That reminds me that also Lapland sun is strong in the spring when there's still snow on the ground. In the military, we had two weeks training in Lapland in April. I fell asleep on a utility box of a cannon, when I woke up, my ear was burnt.
                That must have looked cool! One white ear and one red one.

                Like the time a wasp stung me on one of my ears and it swelled up about four times normal size.

                I laughed myself (after the pain wore off a bit).

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                • #9
                  My worst burn happened when I was a teenager. It was a beautiful Saturday in May. I went outside with a book and sat reading for a few hours. The next day, to my horror, my face was grotesquely swollen. The day after that my face was covered with huge blisters. I was out of school a whole week. This was in East Texas and I have since learned to stay out of the sun!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jambalaia32
                    Is there a test to gauge your skin and eyes' sun sensitivity? Or to gauge which rays you are sensitive too? All bright radiating lights singe me a little.-even light bulbs and the computer screen (aches my eyes)I'm not complaining-I'm glad I burn-I'm suppossed to-I guess.But I didn't always,so maybe it's the hole in ozone layer or something.Yep, as I kid I'd play all day outside,and didn't feel the sun stinging,but now I can't go out without my sunscreen,sunglasses,and a scarf,to keep the sun from stinging my scalp.I do enjoy the warm weather and don't mind the heat,but when sunscreen's on sale I try and stock up. This ain't particularly a genetic ancestry thing,but if you get your whole genome tested ,they'll know if you have bright light sensitivity,in you genes somewhere.On one hand it can be assumed,but I like everything confirmed and explained-I like to tell people I got "Proof"-what's more believable than that? Since I didn't burn as a kid,but do now, do you think I actually turned Whiter? Is that even possible? It's probably the Ozone hole.
                    I don't know about tests to see if you are sensitive but I can tell you that some medications will make you more sensitive to the sun's rays & you will burn worse. Some high blood pressure meds & some oral cancer meds will do that.
                    Helen_1937

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                    • #11
                      I had a roommate, redhead, who fell asleep in the sun while taking antibiotics and turned bright purple. This was before sunscreens, which if you are sunsensitive you ought to wear, if you can, which I can't, because I'm allergic to them. Bottom line seems to be that if you are blue-eyed and/or fair skinned, you can safely assume you're sun sensitive and thank all your Northern European ancestors.

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                      • #12
                        Phenotype & Sun

                        Originally posted by N4321
                        I had a roommate, redhead, who fell asleep in the sun while taking antibiotics and turned bright purple. This was before sunscreens, which if you are sunsensitive you ought to wear, if you can, which I can't, because I'm allergic to them. Bottom line seems to be that if you are blue-eyed and/or fair skinned, you can safely assume you're sun sensitive and thank all your Northern European ancestors.
                        As a fair-skinned, auburn-headed L3, those European ancestors must have had some strong genes. Anyone know how many genes are involved in skin color? All I know is that it seems like much of my melanin is concentrated in many moles called Clark's Nevi that the "Snipper" (dermatologist) likes to take off because they have a higher incidence of turning into melanoma. 3 more will go this month.

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                        • #13
                          Sonia:

                          I don't think a unique gene for skin color has been found, nor does it probably exists, I think I read once that many genes may be involved. Clearly, melanin production was subject to strong natural selection based on where the person lived. Ancestral humans must have been dark skinned, then those who moved to the chilly northern regions lost their melanin. Also, chimps have white skin, so one can hypothesize that humans became black when they lost their hair.
                          Note also that women have usually less color than men.

                          cacio

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                          • #14
                            Worst burn for me was falling asleep on the top deck of a cruise ship for about half an hour in the Caribbean with just sun block on my face. My whole front was burnt, and a couple blisters. Would roll over at night, and would wake up from the pain. Wearing anything more than the shorts I had on, it was ouch time! Didn't mean to sleep, just wanted to sit for several minutes after coming out of the pool...

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