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Pedigree for DNA research purposes

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  • Pedigree for DNA research purposes

    It would be helpful if I could have some guidance on the minimum information I should include in a tree to attach to my DNA results.

    My primary tree contains about 20,000 individuals and many events etc and seems to be too big to upload as a Gedcom.

    Thanks, Roger

  • #2
    I am in a similar boat and I am currently working on a skeleton tree for my FTDNA account. So far I have gone with including name, date of birth/death and places for people who are deceased. However people who are still living are set to private. My gedcom file is otherwise too large and unwieldy to upload to FTDNA.

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    • #3
      If you are loading your GEDCOM for use with the Family Finder test (autosomal DNA test), I don't think it makes sense to go back more than 8-10 generations. Even at the level of 4th cousins, it is estimated that 90 percent won't show up as an autosomal match. 5th or 6th cousins are occasionally spotted among Family Finder matches, but not very often.

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      • #4
        How far back in time have any of you been able to turn a tree match into a TG?

        I, and two others, recently shared a tree match with a CA born 1663, and we overlapped on a segment, and I did a one-to-one. Although I applied the rules, I am not ready to concede this is a TG because it is so far back; but if I were able to also find two others to join the TG, I WOULD call this a valid TG.

        Please share your opinions. Many thanks.
        Last edited by Biblioteque; 23 February 2018, 05:44 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rogtut View Post
          It would be helpful if I could have some guidance on the minimum information I should include in a tree to attach to my DNA results.

          My primary tree contains about 20,000 individuals and many events etc and seems to be too big to upload as a Gedcom.

          Thanks, Roger
          It seems when importing gedcom to FTDNA, they strip away most of the events. So only birth/death seems to be needed in your Gedcom. Should make your Gedcom much smaller (since you wrote your file has many events). Also as other suggest, maybe not needed to get to long back in time (unless for your Y and mtDNA search).

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          • #6
            I find that trees with large numbers of siblings and cousins at each generation actually make it hard to find connections on them.
            The tools for trees at FTDNA are limited.

            I only have a tree that has my direct anscesters at each generation, with the birth / death dates and locations.
            Any potential match that is interested in their genealogy will know of one of those people.

            If someone makes contact or has questions, I can share information from my offline & complete tree.
            This also saves maintaining the tree at FTDNA.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Gecko View Post
              I only have a tree that has my direct anscesters at each generation, with the birth / death dates and locations.
              Any potential match that is interested in their genealogy will know of one of those people.
              Are you sure about that?

              Take this example, which is not uncommon ... You have a female ancestor who immigrated to your country in the 19th century. You don't know where she came from (although you can guess, from her surname) and you don't have her parents' names. She was my ancestor's sister - but I have a tree with only my direct ancestors named.

              How would you identify the connection?

              We would be 4th cousins or thereabouts, with say 54cM shared ... a number that fits a huge range of probable relationships. So a tree that includes siblings is much more helpful than a tree that's direct-line only.

              If you find it difficult to see connections in the default Family View, you can switch to Pedigree View - that gives you the direct line.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Fern View Post
                Take this example, which is not uncommon ... You have a female ancestor who immigrated to your country in the 19th century. You don't know where she came from (although you can guess, from her surname) and you don't have her parents' names. She was my ancestor's sister - but I have a tree with only my direct ancestors named.

                How would you identify the connection?
                So I have my ancesters surname.
                From your information, you have that surname in your tree if I read correctly.
                I make contact and ask.

                Maybe what I suggest is not perfect, but it is as perfect as I see that I can get.

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