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  • A Few Questions

    I had an autosomal test done at another company besides familytreeDNA. If I were to test my autosomal DNA again using FTDNA would I expect to find the same exact results? Or do people test their autosomal dna at multiple places?

    If 2 people have a DNA match and have a gedcom file loaded online with the common ancestor on the file, is there a tool, on any website, that can determine the common ancestor automatically?

    I am trying to convince my inlaw to get their Y-DNA tested and asking them to pay for it. (I am doing the research for their family). I would be the one to lookup the matches and determine the ancestor matches. Is the best way to let them create the account and just give me access to that account? So I would just ask him for the password, or is there a better way?

  • #2
    The day any of my relatives agree to a DNA test AND pay for it themselves I will be in some genealogy Shangrila.

    I am struggling to get an incredibly useful 2nd cousin to transfer for free from MyHeritage to FtDNA. I doubt he will. His grandmother was born in the 1860s and he's just not very interested in that side of the family.

    He probably hasn't passed on his log-in details to anyone and he's in his ninth decade.

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    • #3
      Many people test at multiple companies. I've tested my mother at 3.

      You might want to consider paying for the test so that you'll have access to it. Or the other person can share the password with you. A 3rd option, if you manage a no. of kits here, is to apply to administer a family project. That way, you can sign in to all kits at once and see the results of everyone in the project.

      Your ethnicity results will probably be different here, but they're somewhat of a guessing game anyway, in my opinion. Your list of matches will be different too, as it will consist of people who chose to test at this company. The only ones who will be the same will be people who tested at both companies and who match the matching criteria of both companies.

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      • #4
        I understand that the interpretation of the results will vary greatly from company to company but what I am wondering if I can expect the STR results to differ. The lab results that show the codes per chromosome.

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        • #5
          The autosomal DNA tests from different companies do not look at the same autosomal DNA markers. There are some that are similar and will give you similar results but it may be beneficial to test rather than transfer. For example, Ancestry has changed what DNA markers their test looks at. The 23andMe test has changed 4 times. FTDNA has not changed yet but they may have to if the manufacturer of the test chips changes things.

          So depending on when and from where you tested, maybe it won't matter too much. It may matter if you pay a lot of attention to distant matches who share small segments of DNA. If you tested more recently at Ancestry or it was one of the 23&me tests, then maybe it would be better to just order FTDNA's autosomal test rather than transfer.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by B259296 View Post
            I understand that the interpretation of the results will vary greatly from company to company but what I am wondering if I can expect the STR results to differ. The lab results that show the codes per chromosome.
            Most companies test SNP (Single-nucleotide polymorphism) and not the STR (Short Tandem Repeats) of the autosomal chromosomes 1 thru 22, including X in the 23rd chromosome (FTDNA, myHeritage, Ancestry, 23andme, ect)

            FTDNA does test STRs in regards to the Y Chromosome in men (they offer yDNA12 to yDNA 111 which tests STRs)

            As mention each company tests a different set of SNPs. the following chart shows the overlap between companies.
            https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_SNP_comparison_chart

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            • #7
              Thanks for your replies

              Especially prairlad. Now I am in between a feeling of beginning to understand it better and being more confused. The way I normally feel when confronted with more DNA information.

              It was a My Heritage test that I took recently. It looks like their results might be good as they test the most autosomal SNPs. I did have my results transferred here.

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              • #8
                You may want to read this book to fully understand DNA process. "The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy" by Blaine T. Bettinger.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by prairielad View Post
                  Most companies test SNP (Single-nucleotide polymorphism) and not the STR (Short Tandem Repeats) of the autosomal chromosomes 1 thru 22, including X in the 23rd chromosome (FTDNA, myHeritage, Ancestry, 23andme, ect)

                  FTDNA does test STRs in regards to the Y Chromosome in men (they offer yDNA12 to yDNA 111 which tests STRs)

                  As mention each company tests a different set of SNPs. the following chart shows the overlap between companies.
                  https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_SNP_comparison_chart

                  MyHeritage to MyHeritage: 702,442
                  FTDNA to FTDNA: 698,179
                  -- assume that means MyHeritage actually tests a few more SNPs than FTDNA (all the rest currently out there test less)

                  BUT - is this an error on their part, or ??
                  MyHeritage to FTDNA (and vice versa) is 702,442 - same as MyHeritage to itself and MORE than FTDNA to itself.

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                  • #10
                    Books

                    Thanks raspchid. I did order that book, "The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing & Genetic Genealogy". Can't wait for it to arrive.
                    I also ordered "Genetic Genealogy in Practice" by Blaine T. Bettinger and Bebbie Parker Wayne. The only thing is I couldn't get that book sent to Australia, where I live so had to send it to a relative in the U.S. instead.
                    You wouldn't think that would be possible in this day and age.

                    Jim

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by loobster View Post
                      MyHeritage to MyHeritage: 702,442
                      FTDNA to FTDNA: 698,179
                      -- assume that means MyHeritage actually tests a few more SNPs than FTDNA (all the rest currently out there test less)

                      BUT - is this an error on their part, or ??
                      MyHeritage to FTDNA (and vice versa) is 702,442 - same as MyHeritage to itself and MORE than FTDNA to itself.
                      That is something one would have to ask the people who compare the SNPs. They should be the same as both companies use the same chip as far as I know. Maybe it is due to the SNP names in each file, as some rsid numbers for SNPs change (merged with another). So if one is comparing files based on rsids rather then actual position number for each SNP, this could account for discrepancy.
                      As well, FTDNA has 3 different testing chips since 2011 which are not mentioned, each one testing less then previous. My tests span the different versions but don’t have them on hand right now for total numbers. I know the original tested over 700000SNPs, but current is around the 690000 mark
                      Last edited by prairielad; 26 November 2017, 09:37 PM.

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                      • #12
                        What is even stranger is the fact that MyHeritage DNA kits are processed by the FTDNA lab. Maybe MyHeritage asked for specific SNPs to be included that FTDNA does not test for one their own orders.

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