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  • No Matches at 37 Markers??

    Greetings,
    I just revised my 25 marker Y-DNA test to 37. At 25 I had 1 match which proved to lead nowhere. At the 37 marker test I have no matches. The Recent Ancestral Origins chart is blank under the 37 marker slot. What is the significance of this? My Haplogroup is R1a1 pointing to a Ashkenazi-Levite heritage as 24 of 25 markers were Jewish. I assume this will not change?
    THANKS FOR YOUR HELP!!

  • #2
    It only stands to reason if you had only 1 match at 25 increasing it to 37 would give you no matches. the more markers the more it narrows down the possibilities.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by fantome
      Greetings,
      I just revised my 25 marker Y-DNA test to 37. At 25 I had 1 match which proved to lead nowhere. At the 37 marker test I have no matches. The Recent Ancestral Origins chart is blank under the 37 marker slot. What is the significance of this? My Haplogroup is R1a1 pointing to a Ashkenazi-Levite heritage as 24 of 25 markers were Jewish. I assume this will not change?
      THANKS FOR YOUR HELP!!
      We need to recruit some more East Europeans for testing.

      My wife's family is Russian, but they snicker when I mention DNA testing.

      Her father's mother was Jewish, but Russians are used to hiding things like that (really - it was often a matter of life and death).

      I'm hoping to talk her paternal uncle into a y-dna test, but Stalin left a real lasting impression on the Russian people.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Stevo
        I'm hoping to talk her paternal uncle into a y-dna test, but Stalin left a real lasting impression on the Russian people.
        But what I've heard is that some of them would like to have Stalin back. That is the old people who used to have food and a roof over their heads during the Stalin times.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by fantome
          I just revised my 25 marker Y-DNA test to 37. At 25 I had 1 match which proved to lead nowhere. At the 37 marker test I have no matches. The Recent Ancestral Origins chart is blank under the 37 marker slot. What is the significance of this? My Haplogroup is R1a1 pointing to a Ashkenazi-Levite heritage as 24 of 25 markers were Jewish.
          Are you limiting yourself to the exact matches shown by FTDNA? Please consider uploading your DNA information into the Ysearch database. Ysearch lets you look around for partial matches, which can be very instructive for understanding your "deep" ancestry.

          On your FTDNA page, either the Y-DNA Matches tab will have a clickable heading for uploading to Ysearch, or perhaps there is a Ysearch icon that you are supposed to click on in order to upload.

          In my own case, my closest matches are only 31/37. Nevertheless, those distant matches correctly cluster around the Carpathian Mountains of Poland, from where my grandfather came. My uncle's closest matches are only 27/37 and mostly in the British Isles, indicating a shared ancestor about 1500 years ago, when Sarmatians were both guarding British forts and protecting (or ruling) White Croatia (now southern Poland).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Eki
            But what I've heard is that some of them would like to have Stalin back. That is the old people who used to have food and a roof over their heads during the Stalin times.
            Yeah, the dog in the backyard next door has food and a roof over his head (and a chain around his neck).

            I once saw a Communist Party demonstration in Red Square.

            It consisted of about 15 people carrying red banners and chanting slogans, as well as they were able.

            It looked to me like the youngest of them was about 70.

            BTW, Stalin sent my wife's paternal grandfather to prison in Siberia.

            Her family is not among those who would like to have Stalin back.

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            • #7
              In times of war there can be little chance of happiness. Armies have been doing it to each other, and others, over and over. Ever since people have been able to muster up a gang of thugs to follow along.
              Last edited by M.O'Connor; 11 June 2006, 10:24 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Stevo
                We need to recruit some more East Europeans for testing.

                My wife's family is Russian, but they snicker when I mention DNA testing.

                Her father's mother was Jewish, but Russians are used to hiding things like that (really - it was often a matter of life and death).

                I'm hoping to talk her paternal uncle into a y-dna test, but Stalin left a real lasting impression on the Russian people.
                Hello Stevo.
                If my heritage is Jewish & Russian, it was a complete surprise as my father never told me so. The family line was that my Grandparents(on his side) were lapsed French Catholics?? I do remember, however, as a child when my mother was mad at my father she would call him " Bo-reese Levinsky", a play on our name, and a "damn russian". I never understood it. In the town I grew up in there was extreme prejudice against Jews and Russians. I guess they felt the need to hide this from me and everyone else in the family.

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                • #9
                  [QUOTE=lgmayka]Are you limiting yourself to the exact matches shown by FTDNA? Please consider uploading your DNA information into the Ysearch database.

                  Hello Igmayka,
                  Yes, thanks, I'll look into this!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I tried ysearch!

                    Originally posted by lgmayka
                    Are you limiting yourself to the exact matches shown by FTDNA? Please consider uploading your DNA information into the Ysearch database. Ysearch lets you look around for partial matches, which can be very instructive for understanding your "deep" ancestry.

                    On your FTDNA page, either the Y-DNA Matches tab will have a clickable heading for uploading to Ysearch, or perhaps there is a Ysearch icon that you are supposed to click on in order to upload.

                    In my own case, my closest matches are only 31/37. Nevertheless, those distant matches correctly cluster around the Carpathian Mountains of Poland, from where my grandfather came. My uncle's closest matches are only 27/37 and mostly in the British Isles, indicating a shared ancestor about 1500 years ago, when Sarmatians were both guarding British forts and protecting (or ruling) White Croatia (now southern Poland).
                    Hello again,
                    I uploaded my 37 marker Y-DNA results to ysearch. I had many matches at 25/37, 2 matches at 28/37, then none thru 37. The 2 at 28/37 were not compatible. The 25/37 matches would not be very reliable would they? Thanks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fantome
                      I uploaded my 37 marker Y-DNA results to ysearch. I had many matches at 25/37, 2 matches at 28/37, then none thru 37. The 2 at 28/37 were not compatible. The 25/37 matches would not be very reliable would they? Thanks.
                      25/37 implies an ancestor about 2000 years ago, I'd say. (Wild guess.)

                      In what sense are the two 28/37 matches "not compatible"? You mean they are from ethnic groups that you could not possibly be descended from?

                      If I were to make a wild guess, I would say that if your patrilineal ancestry were Jewish, you would get much closer matches, simply because the Jewish community is very strongly represented in genetic testing. If I were to combine the family stories of Russian and French Catholic heritage, I would make a wild guess that your patrilineal ancestry is either Ukrainian Catholic or Belarusian Catholic. There are millions of Ukrainian Catholics in Ukraine, the United States, and elsewhere. Most of them originate from western Ukraine, which was under Austrian occupation during the 19th century and hence was able to retain some Catholicism, as opposed to eastern Ukraine which was under despotic Russian occupation which wiped out the Ukrainian Catholic Church in that region.

                      Belarusian Catholics are much rarer because all of Belarus was under Russian occupation during the 19th century, and the Belarusian Catholic Church was wiped out.

                      Catholics in Russian-occupied areas might have escaped the persecution by emigrating to France, however. Perhaps that is precisely your ancestors' situation?

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