Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How many YDNA markers to start with?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • efgen
    replied
    I have one project member who can't upload to the GP until he has the SNP test done. This is what his Genographic Project tab says:
    Genographic Project

    The Genographic Project is a real time effort to map how humankind populated the earth. It is a five-year research partnership between National Geographic and IBM with support from the Waitt Family Foundation, and public participation through Family Tree DNA. More about it can be found here.

    Already being a Family Tree DNA customer, you would be given the opportunity to join the Genographic Project without having to order a kit and perform a new test. Being that the Genographic Project is highly based on a firm Haplogroup assignment for the purposes of tracking the deep ancestral origins, your suggested Haplogroup should have a minimum level of certainty to allow us to upload your data to that Project. While your results suggest a specific Haplogroup, it does not meet the minimum requirements of certainty and therefore we cannot have your data uploaded to the Genographic Project.

    If you wish to order a test to confirm your Haplogroup, please click here. After your Haplogroup is confirmed we will be able to upload your record.
    The "please click here" link brings me to his Haplogroup tab, where he could order the deep-clade test from. He's predicted as J1 and his matches page shows only 11 matches (12-marker).

    His 12-marker results were received in late November 2005. Maybe FTDNA has changed their policy since then?

    Leave a comment:


  • lgmayka
    replied
    Are you sure that the backbone SNP test is really necessary anymore? In my case, I had no 12-marker matches, and so FTDNA predicted my haplogroup (I1b) but then, at no extra charge, ran an SNP confirmation test (P37.2+) to ratify their prediction. The results of the SNP confirmation came about 6 weeks after the initial 12-marker results, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • efgen
    replied
    My grandfather's Genographic Project kit invoice had the following price breakdown:

    $ 20.00 kit
    + $ 60.00 lab test
    + $ 19.95 legacy something-or-other (I forget the exact phrase used, but I assume this is the contribution to the Genographic Project)
    ---------
    = $ 99.95 total cost for kit
    + $ 7.55 S&H
    ---------
    = $107.50
    + $ 6.45 FL sales tax (other places taxed: CA,DC,FL,KY,MI,PA,VA,VT,Canada)
    ----------
    = $113.95 TOTAL COST

    Once you test through GP, you can upload to FTDNA for no additional charge and then order additional tests. Note that the GP test includes a confirmed haplogroup assignment.

    Now, if you test through FTDNA first, you can upload your results to Genographic Project for a $15 fee (contribution to the GP). However, if your haplogroup prediction isn't a confident one and you haven't already had a Backbone SNP or Deep Clade test done, they won't let you upload your results to GP until you take (and pay for) a Backbone SNP or Deep Clade test to confirm your haplogroup. And you won't get the migration map and Journey of Man DVD that is provided with GP kits.

    So going from FTDNA to GP can be more expensive than going from GP to FTDNA, if you need to pay for a haplogroup confirmation. Let's see what it is for a 67-marker test:

    FTDNA to Genographic Project:

    $269.00 FTDNA 67-marker kit (through a project)
    + $ 15.00 upload to GP
    ------------
    = $284.00 TOTAL (assuming you don't need a Backbone SNP test)

    If you need a backbone SNP test, you'll be paying over $300, probably closer to $350. I can't remember the exact price of the backbone SNP test, but the deep clade test is $79 -- maybe it's the same?

    Genographic Project to FTDNA:

    $107.50 GP kit (includes haplogroup confirmation)
    + $189.00 FTDNA 12-to-67 upgrade
    -------------
    = $296.50 TOTAL


    The other consideration is time. If you order through FTDNA first, you'll get your results within 6-8 weeks and then you can upload your results to GP at your convenience. However, if you order through GP first, you'll get your 12-marker results within 6-8 weeks and then you first have to transfer your results to FTDNA, order the upgrade to 67 and wait another 6-8 weeks.

    So the major decision is really time vs money. Then also consider whether you want the extras (migration map, DVD) that the GP kit includes and whether those are more important to you than quicker higher-marker results.
    Last edited by efgen; 9 June 2006, 11:12 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMac
    replied
    Originally posted by kmeredith
    These are all really good suggestions. Thank you so much for replying.

    I hadn't thought about pre-joining a surname project, it's a great idea. However, if I don't go through the Genographic Project, do they lose out on money? Or does most of that $99 go to FTDNA anyway? Does anyone know? From what I understand, if I go through FTDNA, I can still share the results with the Genographic Project, right?

    Thanks again!
    If you test through the Genographic project, it'll cost you $99.95. I do not know if it costs anything to transfer the results to FTDNA but, I've never heard of any associated with that transfer. I assume the Genographic project has cut some deal where they get a lower rate from FTDNA for the testing so some of the $99.95 goes to support the project.

    If you test through a surname project with FTDNA, it will cost you $99 for 12 markers (which is what you get through the Genographic project) but, it will cost $15 to move your results to the Genographic ptoject. The $15 goes to support the Genographic project.

    Leave a comment:


  • kmeredith
    replied
    These are all really good suggestions. Thank you so much for replying.

    I hadn't thought about pre-joining a surname project, it's a great idea. However, if I don't go through the Genographic Project, do they lose out on money? Or does most of that $99 go to FTDNA anyway? Does anyone know? From what I understand, if I go through FTDNA, I can still share the results with the Genographic Project, right?

    Thanks again!

    Leave a comment:


  • DMac
    replied
    Originally posted by kmeredith
    I recently tested HVR1 mtDNA and I've ordered HVR2, and now I'm ready to have the male members of my family tested.

    Can anyone recommend where to start? My mother's maiden name was Golliher, so when my uncle is tested, I'll probably join a surname project (Gallagher?). It looks like it would be cheaper to go through the Genographic Project first, and then order more markers later, but I'm unsure how much help additional markers will be. Would I be better off just getting more markers now? How many markers do people generally get? Does it depend on the surname project? Or on how many matches you have?

    Same question for my father, only I need mtDNA from him, too. (Or I could get it from his sister...)

    Of course I'd like to get all the markers tested for that I can, but I'd like to be economical about it, too. No sense in spending money if it won't be useful.

    Thanks!
    kmeridith,

    12 markers, which is what you'll get through the genographic project, is just not enough to do much for you if your interest is genealogy. I started at 25 markers and subsequently upgraded to 37.

    The ideal number really depends on the individual and the number of matches they may have within their surname study. In my case, until very recently, 25 markers was sufficient. I had no close matches within the project as well as outside at 25. If you've got a lot of close genetic cousins in your surname study, having 37 markers tested helps define the individual lines. But, I upgraded to 37 when I did because of curiousity.

    What would I do, knowing what I do now? I'd test through the genographic project because I do support what they are attempting to do. I'd take those results and have them moved to FTDNA and then upgrade to 37 markers. Why 37 considering what I wrote previously? Simply because the price has declined quite a bit from when I originally started and it rules out those false positives many people get at 12 & 25 markers. If you're getting matches at 37 markers, even with people of other surnames, it's time to start taking note.

    Leave a comment:


  • lgmayka
    replied
    If you pre-join a project, I think that ordering directly through FTDNA is not more expensive than going through National Geographic.

    I second the view that waiting for results is a major purgatory. Hence, it makes much sense to immediately order as many markers as you think will eventually prove useful. Besides, there is a price advantage to ordering many markers together initially, if you read the price list closely.

    I am already regretting my initial unwillingness to purchase a full 67 markers for my uncle. His 37 markers yielded very unusual and interesting results, and I am now eager to know more. His haplogroup came out to be G2, and his closest matches are 27/37 in the British Isles. He appears to be a remnant of the Alans' reign in southern Poland in the 5th century! Note that the Alans spoke an Iranian language.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Denning
    replied
    Originally posted by kmeredith
    I recently tested HVR1 mtDNA and I've ordered HVR2, and now I'm ready to have the male members of my family tested.

    Can anyone recommend where to start? My mother's maiden name was Golliher, so when my uncle is tested, I'll probably join a surname project (Gallagher?). It looks like it would be cheaper to go through the Genographic Project first, and then order more markers later, but I'm unsure how much help additional markers will be. Would I be better off just getting more markers now? How many markers do people generally get? Does it depend on the surname project? Or on how many matches you have?

    Same question for my father, only I need mtDNA from him, too. (Or I could get it from his sister...)

    Of course I'd like to get all the markers tested for that I can, but I'd like to be economical about it, too. No sense in spending money if it won't be useful.

    Thanks!

    here is good advise
    as many as you can afford to do
    the wait can be a killer as these people will tell you

    Leave a comment:


  • kmeredith
    started a topic How many YDNA markers to start with?

    How many YDNA markers to start with?

    I recently tested HVR1 mtDNA and I've ordered HVR2, and now I'm ready to have the male members of my family tested.

    Can anyone recommend where to start? My mother's maiden name was Golliher, so when my uncle is tested, I'll probably join a surname project (Gallagher?). It looks like it would be cheaper to go through the Genographic Project first, and then order more markers later, but I'm unsure how much help additional markers will be. Would I be better off just getting more markers now? How many markers do people generally get? Does it depend on the surname project? Or on how many matches you have?

    Same question for my father, only I need mtDNA from him, too. (Or I could get it from his sister...)

    Of course I'd like to get all the markers tested for that I can, but I'd like to be economical about it, too. No sense in spending money if it won't be useful.

    Thanks!
Working...
X