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  • DNA Profile Article MSNBC

    This article on criminial DNA is going to make it harder for people to get DNA testing for Surname research. It is beginning to make DNA testing a dirty word in the mind of the public. Tuff issue good and bad on both sides.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13090898/ /

  • #2
    This is quite a bit disconcerting; especially, since I've been trying to convince a cousin of mine to submit his cheek swab for ydna study. This is the type of stories that has kept him from doing so. He's the only male of that line I have to determine a greatgreatgrandfather's origins.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pam HamiltonGan
      This is quite a bit disconcerting; especially, since I've been trying to convince a cousin of mine to submit his cheek swab for ydna study. This is the type of stories that has kept him from doing so. He's the only male of that line I have to determine a greatgreatgrandfather's origins.
      I believe, I am running into the same problem with my contacts in England on my surname project. I have yet to convince him to submit a sample. He and his family are the only family in europe with my surname. It is critical that I get there involvement. To make matters worse, he is an interested in genealogy and is researching right now. Articles like this might make the few people with my surname scared for many different reasons. I hope Familytreedna does something to change the public perception of genetic dna testing.

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      • #4
        Alternatively, it might raise the public consciousness about DNA testing; if more people are aware of it, they may want to take advantage of the option to get their DNA tested. This will generate some healthy debate on how the privacy of DNA samples should be protected. We all have phone numbers and social security numbers. They are useful, and there is public outrage over their abuse by some government agencies and private companies. This will inspire legislation to limit their misuse. I think the same will be true of DNA samples. No one can stop a great, relatively new technology that has many positive uses. It remains up to us, we who believe in the benefits of DNA testing, to become activists to protect the privacy of people who get their DNA tested.
        Judy

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by KerryODair
          I believe, I am running into the same problem with my contacts in England on my surname project. I have yet to convince him to submit a sample. He and his family are the only family in europe with my surname. It is critical that I get there involvement. To make matters worse, he is an interested in genealogy and is researching right now. Articles like this might make the few people with my surname scared for many different reasons. I hope Familytreedna does something to change the public perception of genetic dna testing.

          ITS NOT THE SAME THING
          COPS TEST WOMEN AND FIND THE DAD
          cant do that here

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jim Denning
            ITS NOT THE SAME THING
            COPS TEST WOMEN AND FIND THE DAD
            cant do that here
            You understand that and I understand that but does the general public get the difference, thats the problem. Genetic genealogy has make clear the difference between the two areas, in order for people to have that warm fuzzy feeling about testing.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jim Denning
              ITS NOT THE SAME THING
              COPS TEST WOMEN AND FIND THE DAD
              cant do that here
              This is the quote from the article in MSNBC on DNA profile:
              The U.S. profiling system focuses on just 13 small regions of the DNA molecule -- regions that do not code for any known biological or behavioral traits but vary enough to give everyone who is not an identical twin a unique 52-digit number.

              Is this the same as familytreedna or is Familytreedna using a different portion of the ydna for their testing. If the same, then there are already 3,000,000 samples and they are adding 80,000 every month. This far exceeds the familytreedna ysearch database.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KerryODair
                You understand that and I understand that but does the general public get the difference, thats the problem. Genetic genealogy has make clear the difference between the two areas, in order for people to have that warm fuzzy feeling about testing.

                ABOUT A YR AND A HALF AGO I HAD 2 MEMBERS IN DENNING AND ONE IN FROSINONE AND 3 IN CHELSEA
                Me and my cousin and son were most of those people and i didnt know if i would ever grow
                thats not today and wont be ftdna net geo and the rest work on this
                as more geneologists get involved . the biggest set back has been rootsweb which is now ancestry. both pretend to be non comercial lol
                if rootsweb got into this it would sky rocket but it will anyways
                you me and the rest are the pioneers just like daniel boone

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KerryODair
                  This is the quote from the article in MSNBC on DNA profile:
                  The U.S. profiling system focuses on just 13 small regions of the DNA molecule -- regions that do not code for any known biological or behavioral traits but vary enough to give everyone who is not an identical twin a unique 52-digit number.

                  Is this the same as familytreedna or is Familytreedna using a different portion of the ydna for their testing. If the same, then there are already 3,000,000 samples and they are adding 80,000 every month. This far exceeds the familytreedna ysearch database.

                  ftdna does work with spencerwells and other antro projects usually these people dont sign release form ,dont have computors , and dont particpate in the genealogy . these are the unknow in ethnic backgrounds
                  it represents business for the companys.

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                  • #10
                    Since yDNA and mtDNA are not shuffled with each generation, they are excellent for ancestry but very bad for crime-solving. I believe the FBI's CODIS markers are on the autosomal chromosomes that are shuffled with each generation. Hence, an exact match across all 26 markers (1 marker on each of 13 pairs of chromosomes) is extremely unlikely unless the evidence actually came from the accused or from his identical twin, if any.

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, I'm a little worried about the government tracking me down via my DNA.

                      I just know any day they will show up and want to make me Holy Roman Emperor.

                      I know I'm shirking my duty living in obscurity like this but . . .
                      Hakuna Matata!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stevo
                        Yeah, I'm a little worried about the government tracking me down via my DNA.

                        I just know any day they will show up and want to make me Holy Roman Emperor.

                        I know I'm shirking my duty living in obscurity like this but . . .
                        Hakuna Matata!


                        if they want it they can get it legal and otherwise

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Stevo
                          Yeah, I'm a little worried about the government tracking me down via my DNA.

                          I just know any day they will show up and want to make me Holy Roman Emperor.

                          I know I'm shirking my duty living in obscurity like this but . . .
                          Hakuna Matata!

                          Don't worry Stevo, the painted celts will come to your rescue. However, we are not very organized, we usually lose the battle. We were to individualistic to be successful in warfare. Hence, so few e3b's

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by KerryODair
                            Don't worry Stevo, the painted celts will come to your rescue. However, we are not very organized, we usually lose the battle. We were to individualistic to be successful in warfare. Hence, so few e3b's
                            I had an English professor in college whose parents had come to the U.S. from Scotland. He theorized that the Celts had not actually painted themselves blue with woad. He said the blue color came from the fact that many of the Celtic warriors went into battle naked . . . and it's damned cold up there where they lived!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Stevo
                              I had an English professor in college whose parents had come to the U.S. from Scotland. He theorized that the Celts had not actually painted themselves blue with woad. He said the blue color came from the fact that many of the Celtic warriors went into battle naked . . . and it's damned cold up there where they lived!

                              Good One, I like the logic but is it grounded in scientific fact

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