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  • Information on autosomal test

    Hello;

    I'm a nubie to this so if this has been address before, please bare with me. I have had the mtDNA which revealed that I belonged to Halogroup H. I then had the mt-H clade test and my results were that I belong to the H3 Halogroup. I have heard of autosomal testing but am unsure if FTDNA offers this under another name. From what I understand, this testing takes into account one's overall genetic makeup. I am adopted, but have been in contact with my birth-mother's sister who was led me down a different information path then what my current results are showing. She told my that their mother was 3/4 cherokee indian (but this comes from her father's side). I'm not surprised by this, but I am trying to be thorough. I was thinking of having the mtDNA-refined, but was unsure exactly what else might be revealed. Can anyone shed any light on this?
    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    mtDNA tests only show your strict matrilineal line: your mother's mother's mother's mother. It sounds as if the "interesting" heritage you wish to pursue is along your mother's father's line. Autosomal testing such as offered by DNAtribes.com might show some of this, but then again it might not. Autosomal testing looks at the DNA that gets shuffled with every generation, so it can be difficult to distinguish one ancestral line from another. These forums have seen all too many complaints of autosomal results that are so ambiguous as to be almost useless.

    You say that you are in contact with your birth mother's sister. Do they perchance have a brother? A Y chromosome test on him would show his patrilineal line (his father's father's father's father...), which I think is what you want.

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    • #3
      Thanks, lgmayka

      Yes, there is one brother (mother's brother) who lives in North Dakota but I don't think that he would participate if you know what I mean. I have thought about it but haven't decided to go down that path. I actually am very excited about the results that I have thus far. I realize that family oral history can be exaggerated. I have been able to trace my mother's father's line as well as my mother's mother's father's line, but can't find anything on the mother's mother's mother's line which is whether my test results are leading me. Might I ask your opinion? Would the mtDNA refine test give me more detailed results or am I at the end of my DNA road without a male. Also, I know absolutely nothing about my birth father or anyone who knows anything, so that (at present) is a dead end.

      Again, I appreciate your feedback.

      Many thanks!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Gaia
        I have been able to trace my mother's father's line as well as my mother's mother's father's line, but can't find anything on the mother's mother's mother's line which is whether my test results are leading me. Might I ask your opinion? Would the mtDNA refine test give me more detailed results or am I at the end of my DNA road without a male.
        If you are interested in your mother's mother's mother's line, mtDNA is indeed what you want to test. It sounds like you already know that your mtDNA haplogroup is H3, and you also have your HVR1 results. You are wondering whether HVR2 results might help further.

        My quick perusal of this scholarly paper

        http://evolutsioon.ut.ee/publications/Loogvali2004.pdf

        indicates that H3 is most common in ancestry rooted in the British Isles and France. In contrast, pre-Columbus Native Americans have mtDNA haplogroup A, B, C, D, or X.

        According to this reference:

        http://www.worldfamilies.net/understand_mtdna.htm

        On the average, an exact match of your HVR1 only implies a common matrilineal ancestor within the last 52 generations. An exact match of both HVR1 and HVR2 implies, on the average, an exact match within the last 28 generations (roughly 700 years, if we assume an average generation of 25 years).

        Do you already have exact matches with your HVR1, either on your FTDNA page or in mitosearch? If you have too many matches, you could then order an HVR2 test (called mtDNArefine, I think) to winnow down the matches to those that are closer to you. But note that 700 years isn't all that close anyway.

        There is a further test, but it is not yet of much help unless your potential relatives take it too: the full mtDNA sequencing. FTDNA offers this, but at a very high cost (e.g., $900 or so). Another firm, argusbio.com, will soon offer this test at a breakthrough price:

        http://www.argusbio.com/store/produc...products_id=29

        However, very few people have gotten this test so far, so there's no large database to compare against. It is mostly useful if you have found someone who, according to the paper trail, may be a relative in the matrilineal line. This test can prove it.

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        • #5
          Addendum: According to that same scholarly paper, H3 is also very common in Spain and Portugal.

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          • #6
            I have 2161 low resolution (HVR1) matches and no high resolution matches (HVR1 + HVR2). Sounds as though I should get the mtDNA-Refined. Te full sequencing test would be great if I could get participation, but that's not likely, not to mention the expense. I really appreciate the information you've provided.

            Again, many thanks!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Gaia
              I have 2161 low resolution (HVR1) matches and no high resolution matches (HVR1 + HVR2). Sounds as though I should get the mtDNA-Refined.
              Since you haven't had your HVR2 test yet, you naturally would have no high-resolution matches. Yes, if you get the HVR2 (mtDNArefine) test, that should winnow the 2161 down to something more manageable and more meaningful.

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              • #8
                Thanks, I just order it. Will see what we see

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                • #9
                  As an American from a family that on both sides has been here a long long time, it seems to me that many American families have a "we're part Indian" legend. It also seems to me that most of those legends are unfounded. Some of them, I think, have their genesis in the physical appearance of a particular family member: someone with dark hair and eyes in an otherwise fair-complexioned, light-eyed family.

                  My own family has a legend like that, on my mother's side: my maternal grandmother's mother was supposedly "part Indian" (tribe unknown). I do not know if this legend has any substance to it. My maternal grandmother had long, golden-blond hair and light blue eyes. If her mother was an Indian or "part Indian," it was not evident in my grandmother's physical appearance.

                  Anyway, I have not yet had my mtDNA or autosomes tested, so I don't know whether or not my family's own Indian legend is true.

                  I suspect that it is not, but one never knows.

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                  • #10
                    Improved Order of Redmen

                    There is a fraternity known as the Improved Order of Redmen. They are a group like the Freemasons and trace their members back to the Boston Tea Party which explains their Indian theme. I have often wondered if legends of Indians in some peoples families were really IOOR members. They did call themselves Indians or Redmen, their local groups were named after local Indian tribes and their leaders were called Sachems. There was also a female group known as the Order of Pocahontas. If a "tribe" is no longer in existance it might be hard to find out if a person was a member. You have to check the old newspapers to see if their name comes up in the meeting announcements.

                    http://www.redmen.org/

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