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  • Eki
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo

    But the width-to-length ratio of one's skull says nothing about his status as a human being.
    Exactly, and neither do color of the skin, hair, eyes and height. They just say people look different to each other and more so if they come from different parts of the world. If you notice that, it doesn't mean you're a racist, it means you're not blind.

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  • Arch Yeomans
    replied
    Related to Mail Carrier?

    Originally posted by taba2much
    well I just took the Y-snp test from DNAHeritage.com hopes this tells me more,
    BUT, I think I may have messed it up, it comes with 3 swabs and I laided one down on the mailing evelope that came with it for a minute, does anyone think I messed up my test, will somebodys dna show up instead of mine, it was pretty clean
    You might want to have your mailman or femailman tested. LOL. I'm sure it's okay.

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  • cobramach
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo
    Sounds like a game of Risk!

    Do you all play that up there?

    From what I can tell from my own genealogical research and from looking at the male lines in my family that have submitted y-dna tests, my own body would be carved up by this debate!

    As I said before, at least two of my lines (one paternal, one maternal) are I1a. There is a third that looks like it probably is, but I haven't firmed up the connection there yet. I just found out a week or so ago that my paternal grandmother's male line may be R1a (got to firm that one up, too).

    Anyway, I apologize for being "contentious," if that's what I've been.

    I have at least two Danish lines of descent, one from Bornholm (in the Baltic, off the coast of Sweden). All I know about the other one is that he was Danish; he first shows up working as a bodyguard for the Duke of Oldenburg in Germany in the 17th century.

    None of us is entirely one thing or another.
    True enough. Why only yesterday, I had delusions of being descended from the remaining populace of pre-plague Norway. I got the results of my 37 marker (still waiting on the other 30 markers) test and received a shock! I am likely I1a uN 1a, a marker shared by Norwegians and Danes, which I knew, but also Swedes!!! All these years, I was raised to be suspicious of Swedes. And what happens? I may be related to some!!!! Just kidding about the suspicion part.

    The cephalic index is interesting stuff. Fell into the wrong hands, so now the research is tainted. Unfortunate. I am tall, blond (what's left) and big headed (on many levels) with a narrow face, as is everyone in my immediate family. Even though both sides of family are 100% Scandinavian, within the two sides of my family there is some marked variation in head shape and body type. Haven't actually measured anyone, though. Could just be superficial.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    There are a lot of things that modern academics, especially here in the USA, shy away from due to the oppressive PC code that prevails in most universities.

    The cephalic index is a legitimate anthropological tool.

    But the width-to-length ratio of one's skull says nothing about his status as a human being.

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  • Kathleen Carrow
    replied
    Head shapes etc.

    Hi guys..waiting for my (Cousins)25-37 Y-DNA in batch #148...
    Its been a loooooong time since the due date of 5/31..sort of like being pregnant..

    Anyway just wanted to put in my 2 cents that even when I was in Grad school..( admittedly a fair time ago)Coon was not even SPOKEN of in academic circles...
    There WERE a lot of skulls around at U of P lab from that era...but it was a big no no..(1987-88)
    20 years almost eeeeeeeeek!
    Kathleen

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  • Eki
    replied
    After two weeks, I'll be having a one week vacation in Iceland. Maybe I can do some anthropological research while I'm there and see if the Icelanders really are as "north-western" as the map claims

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Phenotype may be a better indicator of overall ancestry than y or mtDNA.

    Then again, I've seen some cases in which autosomal dna appeared to have played Russian roulette!

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  • Eki
    replied
    I noticed Wena's post about "genetic similarities between the Scandinavian Saami, British and Sardinians populations in haplogroup U5" here:

    http://www.familytreedna.com/forum/s...ead.php?t=1797

    Looking at the map, the "north-westerness percentage" seems to be 25 both for Lapland and Sardinia. So maybe there are other correlations than that of western Finland and central Norway?

    Our physical appearance is probably not directly linked to our X- or Y-DNA, but I think it's linked to the average of all our genes.
    Last edited by Eki; 8 June 2006, 03:31 AM.

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  • Eki
    replied
    Originally posted by Noaide
    What do the "25" in the middle of Lappland means Eki?

    That people there were relatively short, dark and had a relatively small head and round face.

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  • Noaide
    replied
    Originally posted by Eki
    I found an interesting antropological map in Kalevi Wiik's book "Suomalaisten juuret" (Roots of Finns). He had calculated what he calls "north-western percentage" for 74 different area in Europe based on how blond, tall, big headed and narrow faced people are (I guess a tall narrow faced blonde with big head would be 100%). I'll try to post the map scanned as an attachment. I don't know if it works, since I've never tried it before here.
    What do the "25" in the middle of Lappland means Eki?

    Leave a comment:


  • Noaide
    replied
    Originally posted by Eki
    He doesn't tell the details of the procedure, but he then uses the percentages to divide Europe into 4 zones based on their "north-westerness". The zones are marked in the attached map. 1 means the most "north-western" and 4 the least.
    Funny map, notice the swing across the White Sea to the Kola Peninsula and deep into northern Finland. According to this the Saami in Norway is number two and those in northern parts of Finnish Lappland are rated as four, huge gap, from what lapp village the four begin I wonder?

    Last edited by Noaide; 7 June 2006, 03:52 PM.

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  • F.E.C.
    replied
    Originally posted by Eki
    Looking at the Coon maps, the people in southern Italy seem to be somewhat shorter than the Greece and their heads seem to be little smaller. There's not much difference between their cephalic indexes and their pigmentation seems to be the same.
    In my country, the popular belief, maybe due to the common cultural roots, coined an old motto that goes more or less like this: "Italians and Greeks: the same face the same race"

    Leave a comment:


  • Eki
    replied
    Looking at the Coon maps, the people in southern Italy seem to be somewhat shorter than the Greece and their heads seem to be little smaller. There's not much difference between their cephalic indexes and their pigmentation seems to be the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by F.E.C.
    Stevo,
    the point is I don't think the map is very accurate.

    I've been in many places all around Europe and I can tell you for sure you can't distinguish a southern Italian from an average Spaniard, Portuguese or Greek whereas it's generally easy to note the differences with the Turks.

    On the other hand it would be difficult to find physical differences in terms of hair and complexion between the average northern Italian and a French.
    I agree.

    But those maps might be accurate in the sense that they measure the totality of the data Wiik had.

    I don't know how much a part an obvious phenotype played.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eki
    replied
    Originally posted by F.E.C.
    Stevo,
    the point is I don't think the map is very accurate.
    The author acknowledges that there are inaccuracies in the Coon maps he based his calculations on. Besides, times change and people change with them. The Coon maps were drawn in 1939. When I was a kid in the 1970s, there were just "white" kids here in Finland. Now it's not uncommon to see "white" kids playing or going to school with "colored" kids or a "white" mother with "colored" children.

    Leave a comment:

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