Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

If YOU ARE ONE, BE ONE

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    R1b Haplogroup Project

    Stevo,

    There's absolutely an R1b project -- a huge one, of course! The admin, Charles Kerchner, is very knowledgable and very active in the genetic genealogy community.

    http://www.ftdna.com/public/R1b

    To join:

    "Log in to your FTDNA personal account page and click on the blue JOIN button in the upper part of your personal page screen. Find the haplogroup projects section. Click on the R backbone haplogroup category. Then click on the R1b project link. You will then see a description of this project. Scroll down to the bottom and click on the small white join button at the bottom of the R1b project join page. That is all there is to it."

    Elise

    Comment


    • #47
      Bless you!

      Thanks very much, Elise!

      I'll be joining that one.

      Comment


      • #48
        You're welcome!

        By the way, you might be interested in this chart of the R1b project results:
        http://www.dnautils.org/ftdna/result...3&sort=markers

        This is a customized version of the chart that's available on the "Y Results" tab of the project website. Charles does have a link to this customized chart on his "Results" tab, but it's mixed in with all the informative text

        Elise

        PS. The chart takes a minute or two to load, be patient.
        Last edited by efgen; 24 May 2006, 06:56 PM.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Stevo
          Is there an R1b project?

          I guess maybe there couldn't be: too many guys are R1b.

          But anyway, is there?
          I actually thought there was one but I could not locate a web site or a mention of one over on the Rootsweb DNA-Genealogy list. I guess I was wrong again.



          Oops, and I just now see Elise's answer. That's what happens when you go eat dinner before hitting the send button.
          Last edited by DMac; 24 May 2006, 06:59 PM.

          Comment


          • #50
            Thanks again, Elise.

            I joined the project.

            That's quite a chart full of info. It's going to take me awhile to peruse all that Charles has set up over there.

            It looks good, though!

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Stevo
              Frisian is also the language closest to English. Both are in the West Germanic group.

              I think the R1b-Frisian group includes most of the R1b in Denmark, and R1b is the biggest y-haplogroup there.
              If only my grandfather was alive (really), then I could ask him why he had an English first name and a German middle name.

              I am reading "Trace Your Root with DNA" by Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak and Ann Turner. The book makes a good supplement to the BIOL 101 textbook (which has little to nothing about genetealogy).

              So far, family history and DNA has been my best resource.

              Note:
              Friday [Frigg's day]
              Frigg (Frigga) is the Teutonic goddess of clouds, the sky, and conjugal (married) love. She is identified with Frigg, the Norse goddess of love and the heavens and the wife of Odin. She is one of the Aesir. She is confused in Germany with Freya.
              Middle English fridai
              Old English frigedæg "Freya's day"
              composed of Frige (genetive singular of Freo) + dæg "day" (most likely)
              or composed of Frig "Frigg" + dæg "day" (least likely)
              Germanic frije-dagaz "Freya's (or Frigg's) day"
              Latin dies Veneris "Venus's day"
              Ancient Greek hemera Aphrodites "day of Aphrodite"
              It is from the Germanic frijaz meaning "beloved, belonging to the loved ones, not in bondage, free".

              Comment


              • #52
                Stevo you're classified as R1 in the chart

                Comment


                • #53

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by F.E.C.
                    Stevo you're classified as R1 in the chart
                    I noticed that, too.

                    I wonder why. FTDNA predicts my R1b1 status pretty confidently.

                    Maybe it's because not all of my markers have come in yet.

                    I fit the Frisian modal pretty closely and am close on the Norwegian, too.

                    Maybe it's my couple of odd markers. And I am nowhere near being an AMH (sorry, Basques).

                    Could I be half way between R1b and R1a?

                    I'll being doing the deep clade tango pretty soon anyway.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by GregKiroKH
                      If only my grandfather was alive (really), then I could ask him why he had an English first name and a German middle name.
                      It was common for the eldest son to have his maternal grandfather's first name as his middle name. Was your great-grandmother from Germany perhaps?

                      With respect to the Frisians, my mother's side of the family are all West-Frisians and I even speak a little. It must be closer to old-english than modern english because I don't see too many obvious similarities!

                      In terms of the germanic pantheon and days of the week, the names varied slightly from the well-known gods of the norse sagas.

                      Initially, the germanic people actually had a nine day week but later converted to the roman seven day week. Many of the germanic names for weekdays did survive the change-over.

                      Tuesday = Ziu's (Tyre) day
                      Wednesday = Wuotan's (Odin) day
                      Thursday = Donar's (Thor) day
                      Friday = Frija's (Freya) day

                      Donar was the most popular god of the pantheon among the people and, as a result, you may find that even into the 17th century many of your germanic relatives married on Thursday.

                      A comparison of various pantheons is set out below:

                      Latin: Mars Mercurius Jupiter
                      Greek: Ares Hermes Zeus
                      Keltic: Hesus Teutates Taranis
                      Old H.G.: Ziu Wuotan Donar
                      Old Norse: Tyr Odinn Thor
                      Slavic: Svantevit Radigast Perun
                      Indian: Shiva Brahman Vishnu

                      It should be noted that the germanic people equated Donar with Jupiter, while the romans equated Donar with Hercules. Either way, he was popular with both the germanic people and romans.

                      John

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Johnserrat
                        With respect to the Frisians, my mother's side of the family are all West-Frisians and I even speak a little. It must be closer to old-english than modern english because I don't see too many obvious similarities!
                        It is closer to Old English. Frisian is what English probably would have been like had Harold Godwinsson and his Anglo-Danes held out at Hastings.

                        Anyway, Frisian is still considered by linguists to be English's nearest relative.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Here is an interesting R1b article.

                          Here is another one.

                          That last article says this in its footnotes:

                          *3* "Greater Frisia" was coined by Dr Ken Nordtvedt, during 2004, to describe the North Sea coastal region of the Northern Netherlands and Southern Denmark, after he detected that the frequency of the R1b combination DYS390=23 and DYS391=11, was unexpectedly high in this region. See, Ken Nordtvedt's R1b Sub-Clade at www.worldfamilies.net/Tools/R1b.html
                          I have that combination (DYS390=23 and DYS391=11).

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Johnserrat
                            It was common for the eldest son to have his maternal grandfather's first name as his middle name. Was your great-grandmother from Germany perhaps?

                            . . .
                            John
                            I do think Egbert and Adolph are family names. I am still working on the genetealogy. Most likely both are not surnames even though Adolph is the middle name.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              I Just Ordered My SNP R1b Deep-Subclade Test...

                              $79.00


                              I hope that it tells me something that I do not already know...

                              When I originally got involved in my own Y-DNA analysis, I was really hoping to discover a point of contact or a lead towards identifying my immigrant ancestor (to the USA) and possibly a little bit more about the origin of my surname.

                              So far, the only direct matches I have encountered that share my surname are all distant cousins who descend from various sons of my great-great-great grandfather who was born in Virginia (USA) in 1776.

                              I was hoping to match some same-surname participants who still resided in the United Kingdom, but so far there are no non-American participants that share my surname who have had their Y-DNA tested...<sigh> I have advertised on various surname messageboards to no avail even offering to pay!

                              Where are they and why don't they participate?

                              So I wait...and wait...
                              Last edited by Lost-Sheep; 26 May 2006, 02:07 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                GOOD LUCK LOST SHEEP

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X