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  • #16
    Originally posted by M.O'Connor
    there is a results page http://worldfamilies.net/surnames/s/...n/results.html

    and a patriarch page http://worldfamilies.net/surnames/s/stevenson/pats.html

    What else do ya need? except a few matches.
    I was referring to the Stevens name, not Stevenson:

    NAME COUNT
    Stevens 58
    Stevenson 12

    Stevens has more members, but the website link just takes you to ysearch.org.


    Paul

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Paul_Sheats
      I was referring to the Stevens name, not Stevenson:

      NAME COUNT
      Stevens 58
      Stevenson 12

      Stevens has more members, but the website link just takes you to ysearch.org.


      Paul
      Yeah, I have wondered about the web site thing myself.

      Comment


      • #18
        A Cool R1b Sort of Web Site

        Here is a cool R1b sort of web site.

        Enjoy it!

        Comment


        • #19
          I think i saw some R1A's in there too...

          Comment


          • #20
            Checking the numbers

            I was just checking my first 25 markers against the R1b varieties chart here.

            My closest matches are R1b-Frisian, with 20 of my 25 markers exactly the same, and R1b-Norwegian (surprise!), also at 20 of 25 markers.

            Like Mike Maddi said, I have a couple of weird markers that don't fit any of the modals.

            At 385b I have 11 repeats. None of the modals have that.

            My series 464a-d is 15, 16, 17, 17. No modal matches it exactly, but the Frisian and the Norwegian are close, with 3 out of 4.

            I have 28 at 449, which only R1b-East has, which may explain my couple of near-miss Russian matches.

            Weird.

            But fascinating.

            Comment


            • #21
              I can't open the rib file...i don't have the program to open it.

              Comment


              • #22
                I made a slight mistake in evaluating my markers there. I actually have 21 exact marker values on the R1b-Frisian3 modal haplotype, not just 20.

                I guess things could change drastically when I get my last 12 markers, but from what I can see, 23 repeats at DYS 390 is unique to the Frisian modal haplotype, and that's what I have. I also have 24 at 447, which is nearly unique to the Frisian modal haplotype (only one other modal shares that value there).

                Still, I'm new at this sort of thing, and maybe the other 12 markers could still alter the situation.

                But I am not nearly as close to matching the other modal haplotypes as I am to the Frisian and the Norwegian.

                I need to try to find some literature on those modals somewhere.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Stevo
                  I made a slight mistake in evaluating my markers there. I actually have 21 exact marker values on the R1b-Frisian3 modal haplotype, not just 20.

                  I guess things could change drastically when I get my last 12 markers, but from what I can see, 23 repeats at DYS 390 is unique to the Frisian modal haplotype, and that's what I have. I also have 24 at 447, which is nearly unique to the Frisian modal haplotype (only one other modal shares that value there).

                  Still, I'm new at this sort of thing, and maybe the other 12 markers could still alter the situation.

                  But I am not nearly as close to matching the other modal haplotypes as I am to the Frisian and the Norwegian.

                  I need to try to find some literature on those modals somewhere.
                  Where is Mike Maddi so I can find out what he thinks?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    There was an interesting discussion of some of this info over at Rootsweb here.

                    I haven't read it all yet.

                    It predates Nordtvedt's R1b chart, which was must reflect his latest findings, since the chart is dated March 1, 2006.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Stevo
                      I was just checking my first 25 markers against the R1b varieties chart here.

                      My closest matches are R1b-Frisian, with 20 of my 25 markers exactly the same, and R1b-Norwegian (surprise!), also at 20 of 25 markers.

                      ...
                      I think I understand . . . my results were R1b-F2 with 464d and YCAIIb AMH markers and 460 (10) R1a Slov/I1a Nordic marker

                      I found a quote:

                      “From: "Ken Nordtvedt" <[email protected]>
                      Subject: Basic Frisian R1b English Distribution
                      Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2006 15:18:45 -0600

                      Yesterday I mentioned that R1b - F2 had not continental pedigree hits from Scandinavia in SMGF, a few German, and bunch of English with no Irish or Scot. The distribution of the English pedigrees avoided East Anglia, Yorkshire and the counties between. I speculated it represented originally Saxon ydna, and should say again this is a working speculation.

                      The basic R1b - Frisiian is quite different. It shows a disproportionate collection of Danish pedigree, along with some German, Scandinavia, English, Irish, Scot, Wales, .......

                      Here is the distribution of pedigrees from English counties for this basic R1b-Frisian

                      Yorkshire 4
                      Derbyshire
                      London
                      Sussex
                      Staffordshire
                      Kent
                      Warwickshire
                      Worcestershire
                      Lincolnshire 2
                      Nottinghamshire
                      Hampshire 2
                      Lancashire

                      It looks more consistent with being a result of the Danish Viking immigration into England, at least in good part. I have found examples of all the different forms of Frisian R1b to be S21+. With more extended haplotype data from this part of the continent it looks like discrimination between the different tribes of that area which contributed to the British y gene pool should be possible.

                      Ken”
                      At least I understood it . . .
                      I found more information too:

                      R1bSTR19 (Irish), R1bSTR22 (Frisian/Germanic), and R1bSTR47 (Scots) where independent analysis supports the broad classification. As a broad rule of thumb if the stem of a cluster is less than 0.1 then some doubt exists, and if it is less than 0.04 considerable doubt exists. . . . Haynes was in R1bSTR24. R1bSTR19 aka David Wilson, Irish” cluster Old cluster name R1ba, R1bSTR22 aka Ken Nordtvelt “Frisian” cluster Was R1bcc Scots/Euro cluster.


                      (http://www.geocities.com/mcewanjc/p3analysis.htm )
                      < Takezaki and Nei 1996 Genetics 144:389-399 >
                      All of this seems to match the historical record . . . The funny thing is that my 25 marker matches were Scottish and another one said she was Irish. Of course, these results are SouthEastern British (who are found in other places in Great Britain too
                      Last edited by GregKiroKH; 23 May 2006, 09:58 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Thanks GregKiroKH.

                        It appears that I have the R1b-Frisian3 haplotype, at least thus far.

                        Where did you get the quote from Nordtvedt? Do you have a link?

                        I guess I'm going to have to order the deep clade test.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Stevo
                          Thanks GregKiroKH.

                          It appears that I have the R1b-Frisian3 haplotype, at least thus far.

                          Where did you get the quote from Nordtvedt? Do you have a link?

                          I guess I'm going to have to order the deep clade test.
                          The quote can be found at
                          http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read...-04/1146345525
                          Steve.

                          I am still waiting on my Deep Clade results. I guess I have to see it to understand it.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            What is Frisian?

                            Definition: About 2000 years ago, the Roman Empire reached the northwest coast of Germany, where (according to reports from Plinius and Tacitus) they met the formidable Frisians. The Frisians were one of the major Germanic tribes in Europe, based primarily in the Netherlands, South Scandinavia, Denmark and the Weser/Oder region. They are the main reason the Romans were kept mostly south of the Rhine; about 450 they crossed the North Sea and invaded England, settling in Kent, East Anglia and Lincolnshire. They remained an important force from the latter part of the Roman period through about 800 AD, when Charlemagne conquered most of Europe. Since then, they continue to keep their cultural identity and language alive today.
                            http://archaeology.about.com/od/fterms/g/frisians.htm
                            I thought that it was the story of a father and his two sons who said Hay to some Danes (and so on and so forth). Oh well, I guess that is Frisian.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Here I am

                              Originally posted by Stevo
                              Where is Mike Maddi so I can find out what he thinks?
                              I've been busy at work the last couple of days and haven't had much free time during the day to post on here.

                              I'd have to say that my semi-educated guess is that you're Frisian of some sort. As I mentioned in an earlier posting, EthnoAncestry has found a strong correlation between R1b's that match the Frisian modal haplotypes and testing S21+.

                              If you do want to SNP test, it would be better to test at EthnoAncestry, even though you would be paying more. This is because you would have to submit a new sample to another company. At this point, FTDNA does not test for S21 or the other R1b SNPs discovered last year by EthnoAncestry.

                              Mike

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Stevo,

                                If you get SNP tested you can also submit your results to John McEwan so he can add your name to his R1b SNP DNA results table. Here's the link:

                                http://www.geocities.com/mcewanjc/r1bsnp.htm

                                As you can see Dr. McEwan can also find what cluster you belong to (Frisian, Irish, Scot, etc...).
                                It's only Mike and I who belong to apparently unpredictable clusters

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