Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

which test to solve 5 generation relationship puzzle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • which test to solve 5 generation relationship puzzle

    In census records and probate records for my 4ggrandfather is listed a grandson. The two sons and 4 daughters of my 4ggrandfather all were married and had children and their own households. It is a mystery as to the parents of this grandson and why he is living with his grandparents and not his parents.
    I am in contact with a male descendant of the grandson and I have a male cousin who is a descendant of one of the sons. I would like to compare the DNA of these two descendants to see if my 3ggrandfather was the father of the grandson or if there is no match then perhaps this grandson was the son of one of the daughters.
    I'm assuming that Y-DNA would be the way to go, but would like some opinions on the best ways to test. Also, how close of a match would you expect over 5-6 generations? Would there be mutations in that time period?
    Thanks for any help.

  • #2
    Y-DNA would be the tests to order. There probably will be some mutations. How many would be nothing but a wild guess. Depending upon the Haplogroup, which you won't know without testing, you'll need 37 or 67 markers. To be safe I'd get 67.

    Watch for a sale starting before the end of the month.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Polley View Post
      I would like to compare the DNA of these two descendants to see if my 3ggrandfather was the father of the grandson or if there is no match then perhaps this grandson was the son of one of the daughters.
      Yes but how would you know that your 3rd great grandfather was the father and not the brother? You say there were 2 sons.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Polley View Post
        In census records and probate records for my 4ggrandfather is listed a grandson. The two sons and 4 daughters of my 4ggrandfather all were married and had children and their own households. It is a mystery as to the parents of this grandson and why he is living with his grandparents and not his parents.
        I am in contact with a male descendant of the grandson and I have a male cousin who is a descendant of one of the sons. I would like to compare the DNA of these two descendants to see if my 3ggrandfather was the father of the grandson or if there is no match then perhaps this grandson was the son of one of the daughters.
        I'm assuming that Y-DNA would be the way to go, but would like some opinions on the best ways to test. Also, how close of a match would you expect over 5-6 generations? Would there be mutations in that time period?
        Thanks for any help.
        What I would do is first do the Y-DNA to see if the two males match. If they do you would then need to try and confirm which of the two brothers he is from. Assuming the two brothers married unrelated women you could try and see which of the wives the descendant of the grandson is related to. You would do this with Family Finder by looking for matches that are related not to the two brothers but to one of the wives (like a descendant of one of their siblings). But start with the Y-DNA of both men and your next step(s) would be determined by the result of the Y-DNA tests.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for all of your suggestions. I realized that the Y-DNA would not distinguish between the two brothers as being the parent of the grandson, but could tell us at least if the parent was one of the sisters or one of the brothers.

          I may be able to find a male descendant of the other brother, as I am in touch with some researchers in that line, but it looks like that is not going to really help.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Polley View Post
            Thanks for all of your suggestions. I realized that the Y-DNA would not distinguish between the two brothers as being the parent of the grandson, but could tell us at least if the parent was one of the sisters or one of the brothers.

            I may be able to find a male descendant of the other brother, as I am in touch with some researchers in that line, but it looks like that is not going to really help.
            If it was me I would go ahead and try to find a descendant of the other brother to Y-DNA test too. It would be a long shot but maybe there would be a mutation in the Y-DNA results that would possibly point to which brother. Even then it wouldn't be conclusive but it would provide more evidence with one over the other, but again that would be a long shot. It would also provide another descendant of that line for doing future Family Finder testing of that branch if you needed it. I think you would be more likely to come to a clearer answer with autosomal DNA (Family Finder) but first you definitely need to do the Y-DNA on at least the two men you mentioned in your original post.

            Comment

            Working...
            X