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Source of DNA of distant relatives?

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  • OrourkeKing
    replied
    Originally posted by John McCoy View Post
    If your Y DNA matches that of other descendants of your patrilineal ancestor, that's a good sign, and may help validate your paper trail.

    However, it is also important to consider:

    Does almost everyone with your surname match closely for Y DNA, including some who trace back to one or more different individuals? If so, it is possible that you descend from some different individual 300 years back, who was related by patrilineal descent to the one you show on your pedigree. In such a case, you would have to say you are related somehow to ALL of them. You wouldn't be able to rule out any of the alternative ancestors.

    However, if modern people having your surname have many different Y DNA patterns, suggesting that they have diverse genetic origins, you will be able to say that you are NOT related by patrilineal descent to the families who have the same surname but don't match your Y DNA. That can sometimes be helpful for genealogical research.
    With my particular ancestry, the different fathers on the family trees have the same surname. The problem is different researchers have a brother as the father in the next son in the family line in different places on the tree.

    For instance, one researcher will have a father listed as John Doe, the son as John Doe II, and the grandson as John Doe III. Another researcher will have the father as John Doe, the son as James Doe (the brother of John Doe II) and the grandson as John Doe III.

    They ALL have the same surname, but a brother is listed sometimes as one of the fathers. So, i figured taking the test, i should STILL be proven to be related to John Doe, the oldest known relative.
    Last edited by OrourkeKing; 7 February 2017, 04:10 PM.

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  • John McCoy
    replied
    If your Y DNA matches that of other descendants of your patrilineal ancestor, that's a good sign, and may help validate your paper trail.

    However, it is also important to consider:

    Does almost everyone with your surname match closely for Y DNA, including some who trace back to one or more different individuals? If so, it is possible that you descend from some different individual 300 years back, who was related by patrilineal descent to the one you show on your pedigree. In such a case, you would have to say you are related somehow to ALL of them. You wouldn't be able to rule out any of the alternative ancestors.

    However, if modern people having your surname have many different Y DNA patterns, suggesting that they have diverse genetic origins, you will be able to say that you are NOT related by patrilineal descent to the families who have the same surname but don't match your Y DNA. That can sometimes be helpful for genealogical research.

    Leave a comment:


  • OrourkeKing
    replied
    Originally posted by jsarnacki View Post
    Yes, as stated, the tests are taken by the descendants of the people whom you see listed being born more than 100 years ago.

    I just wanted to add, the most distant paternal ancestors are listed by many, however some may have strong paper trails leading to this person, other's may not have the supporting documentation. When comparing your dna results to these other people, it is best if you can determine who's paper trails are well documented for comparisons. Project administrators can often help you determine which family lines are most accurate. My surname project administrator is great at helping us maneuver through our research.
    This was the answer i was looking for. I come from a surname that my paternal relatives are pretty solid on the ancestry ( family tree) but there are some questions. ( some relatives have different people listed as fathers on their family trees, etc.) but we are all in agreement as to who our oldest known ancestor is on the family tree is and how and when he came from Ireland. I figured me taking the YDNA test would make it a moot point as to who has the accurate family tree if i can be proven to be related to our oldest known distant relative.
    Last edited by OrourkeKing; 7 February 2017, 03:12 PM.

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  • jsarnacki
    replied
    Yes, as stated, the tests are taken by the descendants of the people whom you see listed being born more than 100 years ago.

    I just wanted to add, the most distant paternal ancestors are listed by many, however some may have strong paper trails leading to this person, other's may not have the supporting documentation. When comparing your dna results to these other people, it is best if you can determine who's paper trails are well documented for comparisons. Project administrators can often help you determine which family lines are most accurate. My surname project administrator is great at helping us maneuver through our research.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Barrett
    replied
    Originally posted by OrourkeKing View Post
    So, its assumed that the oldest known relative would have that DNA profile because of test results of family members who actually took the test? Lastly, I didn't see a test takers name, only the oldest known descendant.
    They are reporting the values of the person who took the test. It is known that his DNA will be similar to that of his paternal ancestors.

    If the ancestor named is in fact one of his paternal ancestors then that ancestor's DNA will be similar to the DNA of the person tested.

    Are you seeing the results when you are signed into someone's kit or are you looking at a report for a project. If it is a project page send us a link to the page and the kit number of the kit you are looking at.

    What is the title at the top of the page you are viewing?

    Leave a comment:


  • OrourkeKing
    replied
    Originally posted by prairielad View Post
    Sounds like you are viewing a project yDNA results page, the person who took the test would be shown under the Name Column, if Name Column is not shown, project admins have disabled it from showing.

    Paternal Ancestor Name column is the test takers oldest known male relative of their known yDNA line that they have traced in their Family Tree.
    So, its assumed that the oldest known relative would have that DNA profile because of test results of family members who actually took the test? Lastly, I didn't see a test takers name, only the oldest known descendant.

    Leave a comment:


  • rmm0484
    replied
    Originally posted by OrourkeKing View Post
    Got a newbie question. I've found kit numbers on Family Tree DNA that belong to distant relatives that lived in 1600s, 1700s, etc. What is the source of the DNA profiles assigned to distant relatives like that? I know Family Tree DNA doesnt have DNA on these relatives, so how are distant relatives assigned a complete DNA profile like that?
    The source of those profiles are their direct descendents who can trace their ancestry back that far. As an example, I match a Danish woman exactly for MtDNA, but my family tree does not link to hers within 300 years...it could be a thousand years back, yet all of my female direct ancestors, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, etc will have this same MtDNA genome.

    Leave a comment:


  • prairielad
    replied
    Sounds like you are viewing a project yDNA results page, the person who took the test would be shown under the Name Column, if Name Column is not shown, project admins have disabled it from showing.

    Paternal Ancestor Name column is the test takers oldest known male relative of their known yDNA line that they have traced in their Family Tree.

    Leave a comment:


  • OrourkeKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
    In which type of DNA results are you seeing their kit numbers? Is there a heading for the column where you are seeing the name of the distant relatives?

    Is it possible you are seeing the names in a column for the most distant known relative?
    I looked at a ydna12 chart of the most known distance relative on our family tree. He was born in the 1600s. He is assigned a dna haplogroup and a string of dna numbers, with a kit number.
    Last edited by OrourkeKing; 30 July 2016, 09:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Barrett
    replied
    In which type of DNA results are you seeing their kit numbers? Is there a heading for the column where you are seeing the name of the distant relatives?

    Is it possible you are seeing the names in a column for the most distant known relative?

    Leave a comment:


  • OrourkeKing
    started a topic Source of DNA of distant relatives?

    Source of DNA of distant relatives?

    Got a newbie question. I've found kit numbers on Family Tree DNA that belong to distant relatives that lived in 1600s, 1700s, etc. What is the source of the DNA profiles assigned to distant relatives like that? I know Family Tree DNA doesnt have DNA on these relatives, so how are distant relatives assigned a complete DNA profile like that?
    Last edited by OrourkeKing; 30 July 2016, 12:37 AM.
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