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  • Surprising Results!

    I just received somewhat surprising results from the NG 2.0 testing. I am a white male from South Carolina but my ethnic breakdown only showed 96% European ancestry with the remaining being from West Africa at 2% and Central Asia at 2%. I assume this means I am descended from someone with African and Native American ancestry within the last 6 or so generations. I have since done the transfer to FTDNA including the family finder update. I'm curious what resources are now available to me or what upgrades if any will be necessary for me to pinpoint where these two surprises appear in my family history?

  • #2
    Originally posted by brown1sc View Post
    I just received somewhat surprising results from the NG 2.0 testing. I am a white male from South Carolina but my ethnic breakdown only showed 96% European ancestry with the remaining being from West Africa at 2% and Central Asia at 2%. I assume this means I am descended from someone with African and Native American ancestry within the last 6 or so generations. I have since done the transfer to FTDNA including the family finder update. I'm curious what resources are now available to me or what upgrades if any will be necessary for me to pinpoint where these two surprises appear in my family history?
    What did your results say when you did the Family Finder update? The Geno 2.0 results are supposed to be a more distant ancestry 5,000 to 10,000 years. The components that make up the results could be more recent but I would see what you get in the myOrigins with Family Finder. Like the African, if you get that result too on the Family Finder result it would be worth looking into more I would say. As far as the Central Asia result that does not mean Native American, Native American has it's own category.

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    • #3
      The ethnic percentages were exactly the same with myOrigin. I am showing one dot or distant relative in the West African region and one dot in the Central Asian area. Not sure how to interpret this.

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      • #4
        Long shot, and small chances of getting information you want, but take tests for paternal line (Y-DNA37) and maternal line (mtDNA).

        Mr W

        P.S.
        Unless you got the above from NG.

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        • #5
          Thanks

          I'm going to order the full sequence. If anyone has had a similar experience or could help me to make sense of the results, it would be greatly appreciated. My family has been in South Carolina since the mid to late 1700's which does somewhat explains the 2% West African. That does mean someone in my family history was obviously passing for white that had African ancestry if these results are accurate. I have to say I am baffled by the Central Asian portion though.

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          • #6
            I remember a guest on Henry Louis Gates's PBS show who had an Asian Y chromosome, instead of the expected African or possibly European. The explanation was that one of his direct male ancestors had probably been brought to the US from Madagascar. I don't remember the details, but you might find something if you google it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by brown1sc View Post
              My family has been in South Carolina since the mid to late 1700's which does somewhat explains the 2% West African.
              At South Carolina's 1895 Constitutional Convention, a one-drop rule was proposed. In fervent opposition, former Congressman George D. Tillman said:
              ---
              If the law is made as it now stands respectable families in Aiken, Barnwell, Colleton, and Orangeburg will be denied the right to intermarry among people with whom they are now associated and identified. At least one hundred families would be affected to my knowledge. They have sent good soldiers to the Confederate Army, and are now landowners and taxpayers. Those men served creditably, and it would be unjust and disgraceful to embarrass them in this way. It is a scientific fact that there is not one full-blooded Caucasian on the floor of this convention. Every member has in him a certain mixture of... colored blood. The pure-blooded white has needed and received a certain infusion of darker blood to give him readiness and purpose. It would be a cruel injustice and the source of endless litigation, of scandal, horror, feud, and bloodshed to undertake to annul or forbid marriage for a remote, perhaps obsolete trace of Negro blood. The doors would be open to scandal, malice, and greed; to statements on the witness stand that the father or grandfather or grandmother had said that A or B had Negro blood in their veins. Any man who is half a man would be ready to blow up half the world with dynamite to prevent or avenge attacks upon the honor of his mother in the legitimacy or purity of the blood of his father.
              ---

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              • #8
                I do very much enjoy Gates's PBS series, and the Madagascar angle is very interesting and one I will certainly look into.

                Never been very fond of Tillman since I am a huge Gamecock fan and Tillman founded our hated rival in the upstate, but I can now certainly appreciate Tillman's words now that I have these results and I am from one of the counties he mentioned. Maybe further testing will be valuable.

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                • #9
                  Sorry, I thought the quote was from Ben Pitchfork Tillman.

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                  • #10
                    I am from North Carolina and show a small amount of Subsaharan African in my DNA. I'm descended from the Ivey family, which is well known to have been mix-raced. My distant male Ivey cousins all carry the y-haplogroup E1b1a8a, which is Subsaharan African in origin. Some of my ancestors were listed as "mulatto" in early records. Being from South Carolina, I bet you have some Lumbee ancestry. There were several tri-racially mixed groups in SC: Brass Ankles, Redbones, and Turks. All these groups share common surnames, and presumably, origins. Look for names like Chavis, Oxendine, Locklear, Goins, Driggers, Sweat, Benehaley, Scott, and Lowery. Although I have a family oral history of Native American, only the African appears in my DNA.

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                    • #11
                      I am familiar with a number of the surnames you mention, and we do have some of them in quite abundance in the area of South Carolina that I'm from, although I am unaware of any connections with my family. My family has a pretty well documented paper trail, and there seems to be no mention of mulatto in any of the documents I have seen. There certainly is no oral history to support the DNA results. My surname is Brown, and this side of the family came to SC from Virginia in the 1750's. This will certainly be an interesting mystery to solve.

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