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The Dead-End Paper Trail

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  • The Dead-End Paper Trail

    My father's line is particularly frustrating to me. It seems to end - or begin - at my ggg-grandfather, born in 1804, who apparently sprang from the earth, along with his two brothers, the same earth that must have swallowed his father and mother and all traces of them.

    For years I and other members of our family have tried to push my father's line further back but to no avail.

    This is the main reason I am having my Y-DNA tested.

    Are any of the rest of you in the same boat?

  • #2
    I feel your pain, Stevo! My paternal ggg-grandfather was born in 1776 on the Virginian (USA) frontier. Th whom, I only have a few hunches. My surname is very uncommon and I hope to someday be contacted by someone in the old country that matches my Y-DNA and who shares the same surname...

    Best regards and good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Lost-Sheep
      I feel your pain, Stevo! My paternal ggg-grandfather was born in 1776 on the Virginian (USA) frontier. Th whom, I only have a few hunches. My surname is very uncommon and I hope to someday be contacted by someone in the old country that matches my Y-DNA and who shares the same surname...

      Best regards and good luck!
      Thanks, Lost-Sheep.

      I have kind of a slightly different problem. My surname is fairly common (it's not Smith or Jones, but it's still fairly common), and my family was in a high-traffic frontier area: the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia (it was still part of Virginia then), Western Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

      There were loads of folks in the early days of the USA with my surname, and a lot of them had the same first names, too. To top it off, my father's family evidently had a bad case of wanderlust.

      If I didn't have to work for a living and had more time and cash to spend, I might be able to track my paternal ancestors down.

      I hope I get some good matches with some folks who can connect me to my immigrant ancestors or at least get me a generation or two further back.

      Comment


      • #4
        "father's line is particularly frustrating to me. It seems to end - or begin - at my ggg-grandfather, born in 1804, who apparently sprang from the earth, along with his two brothers, the same earth that must have swallowed his father and mother and all traces of them."



        I personally think that you have found quite a bit of information. I wish I could go back in my family history that far. My Grandfather appeared out of nowhere too, no one can tell me who his parents were or remember ever seeing his mother or father. So although I feel for you because I too have been searching for information for 10 years now with no success, I think you have been very successful.

        Phyllis (PBJ)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Stevo
          My father's line is particularly frustrating to me. It seems to end - or begin - at my ggg-grandfather, born in 1804, who apparently sprang from the earth, along with his two brothers, the same earth that must have swallowed his father and mother and all traces of them.

          For years I and other members of our family have tried to push my father's line further back but to no avail.

          This is the main reason I am having my Y-DNA tested.

          Are any of the rest of you in the same boat?
          I kinda of have the same problem except Im trying to connect me to father's Mother, my grandmother father's side , y-dna won't work, thats only male to male, mtdna won't thats the female line, all my relatives are dead, so Im at a lost, any Ideas

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          • #6
            Pretty much the same reason for me, Stevo, although you've gotten further back than me. I'm stuck on my paternal line around 1851. What makes it hard for me, is that my g-grandfather was apparently only around long enough for his wife to pop out a couple kids, and then he left my
            g-grandmother, or died, or something, not sure. All this happened between censuses, so I have no record of them together. I have my hunches, but I haven't found any record to know whether the man I think was my g-grandfather, actual was.

            Comment


            • #7
              My initial interest in genetic genealogy came about because I have a brick wall in my research. It concerns my great-grandfather Nunzio Maddi. Family legend had it that he was actually the son of a nobleman, but given to a Maddi family to raise. All the great-grandchildren were told this story as children. One of my second cousins remembers being told that the mother of Nunzio was a servant to the nobleman and my sister remembers hearing the nobleman's surname began with the letter "c."

              Nunzio's only mention in the records of the town in Sicily where he lived and presumably was born about 1845 is his name on the birth records for my grandfather (1875) and one of his sisters (1878). My grandfather's birth record describes Nunzio, in Italian, as "Nunzio, of unknown parents, also known as Maddi." So this seems to confirm the essentials of the story we were told as children, at least that he was abandoned.

              Last summer I hired a Sicily-based genealogy researcher to go to the town hall and find Nunzio's birth and marriage records which I did not find in the microfilmed records when I looked. The researcher came up empty. So the mystery remains.

              Which led me to genetic genealogy and Family Tree DNA last year. I have tested for 37 markers and am awaiting the results of my upgrade to 59. I will just have to sit and wait until I have a perfect or almost perfect match with someone with Sicilian ancestors to solve this mystery. That's one reason why I joined the Sicily Project and became its co-administrator, so that I can encourage more people with Sicilian ancestors to test. That will increase the chances someday of finding out who Nunzio's birth father was.

              Mike Maddi

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Stevo
                >>>>

                This is the main reason I am having my Y-DNA tested.

                Are any of the rest of you in the same boat?
                It seems by the replies received so far that most of us are in the same boat; give or take a few years.

                Cheers!
                Victor

                Comment


                • #9
                  These 2 have been driving me nuts for decades - 1) Have been hunting for the parents of my ggg-grandfather Elijah Eagon, born 1774 Baltimore, Maryland & declared an orphan at age 16. Found 1 brother (may have died in the Baltimore poorhouse) & 2 sisters ( one married an Abner Key, the other a McKenna). 2) Need the ID of my gg-grandfather Soldier (first name unknown) Cox who raped my gg-grandmother with chloroform when home on leave from the Union Army. Supposedly a court case about it, but haven't found it, course it was Civil War time. Plus it could have happened in either Clark Co. or Logan Co., Ohio. Her family was enumerated in both counties in 1860. Probably Logan where they had moved to, but could have been Clark Co if she had been back visiting relatives. Multiple Cox surnamed soldiers in Union army from both counties.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow!

                    Some of you have even more difficult problems than I have. Guess I have been blessed.

                    I hope you all experience success.

                    God bless!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Stevo
                      My father's line is particularly frustrating to me. It seems to end - or begin - at my ggg-grandfather, born in 1804, who apparently sprang from the earth, along with his two brothers, the same earth that must have swallowed his father and mother and all traces of them.

                      For years I and other members of our family have tried to push my father's line further back but to no avail.

                      This is the main reason I am having my Y-DNA tested.

                      Are any of the rest of you in the same boat?
                      I'm sure it's absolutely impossible to have everything on paper-paper genealogists ought to admit that.DNA is a handy modern tool.It's the modern way to go-especially when the paper trail stops.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jambalaia32
                        I'm sure it's absolutely impossible to have everything on paper-paper genealogists ought to admit that.DNA is a handy modern tool.It's the modern way to go-especially when the paper trail stops.
                        I agree.

                        There are some people out there who are darn good at tracking the paper trail, but that requires a lot of know-how, as well as time, money, and the ability to travel to the sources.

                        Sadly, I have to work for a living.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My brick wall stands at the very start of the path on my maternal side - my mother was adopted. After a year of paper research I only know that her birth certificate is genuine and have only a partial confirmation of it in one other public record.

                          So, with the hope that genealogical interest and the proclivity to genetic testing are heritable traits -

                          My GM was Dorothy H. Hiles said to have been born circa 1902 in Michigan and employed as a telephone operator in Green Bay Wisconsin in 1920-21. She does appear as a resident employee of The New Bay City Hotel in Green Bay for 1921.

                          At the time of my mothers birth - August 1921 - she was not married to GF Russel Nelson said to have been born circa 1898 in Pennsylvania and employed as a Linotype operator in Ft. Yates North Dakota.

                          My maternal GM was certainly Native American - Haplogroup C - and, based on an AncestrybyDNA 2.5 test both GP's may have been Native to some degree, and possibly Sub-Sharan African as well.

                          Neither appear by name or particulars in any census for any of the indicated times or places.

                          The great thing about genetic testing is that the results are concrete and unequivocal although their meaningful interpretation depends upon a large database of comparables. Hopefully the results will help us close on the more desirable data - names, dates, and stories.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Neither appear by name or particulars in any census for any of the indicated times or places.
                            Wow Tomcat...you certainly got that right! I tried to help you when I read your postig as I have a US Federal Census subscription on ancestry.com, but your grandparents are nowhere to be found!

                            Good luck on your journey...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Stevo & others,
                              I can relate (pun intended) to all of you,
                              I did not grow up with my father's family, so I had nothing to go on but a surname. And that turned out to be wrong!
                              I have hit the proverbial "brick wall" at David L. May, my 4th ggrandfather born in KY about 1802.
                              I think, anyway.
                              I joined the May surname project after locating my father's (who is deceased)
                              brother who gave me a sample.
                              We did match another man, but he knows less than I do about our genealogy.
                              I know I'm better off than most since I do know my maiden name.
                              I'm just waiting for a match to someone who has a paper trail.
                              I have been looking for years,too!
                              And, I've spent MANY dollars in genetic testing.
                              And here's a side note of intrest: my paternal haplogroup is J2.
                              So, most of the participants in our project will never match. Most are R1b or I. And I belong to the J2 project as well. We have been SNP'd, &
                              I'm now waiting for results of J2 deep sub clade testing.
                              So... I wait!
                              Good luck,
                              Cinda

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