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Chromosome Significance?

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  • Chromosome Significance?

    I appreciate the complexity of investigating connections when there are significant SNP matches an a given gene, but before I attempt to explore these revelations, I have a fairly simple question which illuminates my newbie status.

    Of what particular significance,if any, is the number of the chromosome wherein the match occurs? More precisely, are there clusters of similar or linked characteristics that is usually associated with each of the twenty-two chromosomes?

    For example--do all the SNPS on Chromosome 4 indicate an aspect of an human body or character that is generally different from any SNPS found on Chromosome 13, etc,etc.?

  • #2
    Various genes which do influence how the body functions (which may cause genetic diseases) or the looks (hair color or eye color) are on different spots on different chromosomes. For instance, I believe that chromosome 6 has genes that have a lot to deal with the immune system. These genes are known by the acronym HLA. You can see a diagram illustrating their location on chromosome 6 at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_leukocyte_antigen.

    However, FTDNA scrubs all results from raw data they give you that have any medical implications. This allows them to not have the FDA regulating the test. Another testing company, 23andMe, has had a lot of problems with the FDA because they provide medical information with their test results.

    Basically, the Family Finder test is only looking for segments you share with other people in the database, without regard to which chromosome the segment is on or what gene may be found in that location. So, there's no real significance to the fact that you share a segment with one match on chromosome 2 and another segment with another match on chromosome 16. The purpose of the test is find cousins in the database, not give you information about any biological significance, if any, of the segments you share with cousins.

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    • #3
      Thanks for information

      Although the medical information is "missing" from FTDNA test results, it is apparently available on my ancestry.com autosomal test. By using the information and programs available through SNPedia, I was able to generate a report that pretty much coincides with my actual health issues.

      My question about the importance of chromosomes does not require your guidance on the medical issues at hand.

      However, FTDNA scrubs all results from raw data they give you that have any medical implications. This allows them to not have the FDA regulating the test. Another testing company, 23andMe, has had a lot of problems with the FDA because they provide medical information with their test results.
      In response to your statement, I am not sure that "scrubbing" the product doesn't violate the purchase agreement with the customer. In my mind it devalues a purchase. There are probably other ways to satisfy the FDA. If not, screw them. We are talking about information and freedom of the press, not drugs or food. Also, who says what the purpose is or is not??
      Last edited by tampamamba; 8 April 2016, 12:16 PM. Reason: more infor

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tampamamba View Post
        Although the medical information is "missing" from FTDNA test results, it is apparently available on my ancestry.com autosomal test. By using the information and programs available through SNPedia, I was able to generate a report that pretty much coincides with my actual health issues.

        My question about the importance of chromosomes does not require your guidance on the medical issues at hand.
        I wasn't trying to give you guidance about health issues, although it seems that you are interested in that. I was trying to answer your question. It seemed to be implied by the way you phrased the questions in your opening post that you were curious about how a segment of DNA might be related to physical functions.

        Originally posted by tampamamba View Post
        In response to your statement, I am not sure that "scrubbing" the product doesn't violate the purchase agreement with the customer. In my mind it devalues a purchase. There are probably other ways to satisfy the FDA. If not, screw them. We are talking about information and freedom of the press, not drugs or food. Also, who says what the purpose is or is not??
        There's an old saying, applicable in this situation - "caveat emptor," meaning "buyer beware." Now you know that FTDNA does scrub medically relevant results from those that they give you as a customer. They've never made that fact a secret, so I don't see how it violates a purchase agreement.

        Try googling "FDA 23andMe" and you'll see what happens when the FDA decides that something is under their area of regulatory control and the company ignores attempts by the FDA to discuss the issues. 23andMe ignored FDA requests for discussion about their provision of health-related results to customers for over a year. The result was that the FDA forced 23andMe to stop providing health results to customers for about two years and only late last year agreed that 23andMe could provide limited health information to their customers.

        While the FDA may or may not be abusing their power, 23andMe's cavalier attitude toward their regulatory power was stupid and arrogant and significantly set back the company. They still haven't recovered.

        So, to advocate that FTDNA just adopt the "screw them" philosophy you'd prefer would put FTDNA in the same position as 23andMe found itself. 23andMe is a company overwhelmingly premised on health results and research as their purpose, with genetic genealogy and finding close relatives hardly an afterthought. FTDNA is a genetic genealogy company, overwhelmingly premised on meeting the needs of genealogists and adoptees.

        So, each company has their niche. If you'd prefer to get some information about health results, you'd do better by testing at 23andMe, although the FDA doesn't allow them to provide a lot of infomation. If you don't approve of the FDA's use of their power, then you should write to your congressmen and senators.

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        • #5
          Sorry

          I was hasty in my response to your assistance. I certainly didn't mean to bite your head off. It's just that I have always been a bit sensitive about authorities and the abuse of power, or decisions made for others which restrict understanding.

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