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  • curious

    If your dad's x chromosome's mitochondria gets destroyed who do you inherit your x chromosomes from?Are both of your x chromosomes a mix of your dad's mom and her mom's dna?In other words what grandparents do you inherit your x chromosomes from during cell divison?

  • #2
    Originally posted by gurl999
    If your dad's x chromosome's mitochondria gets destroyed who do you inherit your x chromosomes from?Are both of your x chromosomes a mix of your dad's mom and her mom's dna?In other words what grandparents do you inherit your x chromosomes from during cell divison?
    Mitochondria are part of human cells that help produce the cell's energy. The x chromosome is a chromosome, not a cell. It has no mitochondria. You get twenty three chromosomes from your dad, and twenty three from your mom.

    One pair of those 46 chromosomes are the sex chromosomes, x and y. Dad can give down either an x or a y. Mom gives down only an x. If dad gives you an x, you're a girl. If dad supplies a y instead, you're a boy.

    We inherit our mitochondrial DNA from our mothers. Mitochondria are located within the nucleus of each cell in the human body. Mitochondria and chromosomes are different things.

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    • #3
      Mitochondria are extra-nuclear - not located within the nucleus. Otherwise a good answer, Stevo.

      Tom

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tomcat
        Mitochondria are extra-nuclear - not located within the nucleus. Otherwise a good answer, Stevo.

        Tom
        Oops! I meant outside the nucleus of each cell! I really did!

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        • #5
          Confusion regarding mtDNA and the X chromosome is routine as the tagline for both is usually "that is inherited from the mother" or some such.

          But there is also some confusion regarding the sex chromosomes.

          In a man, his single X chromosome, contributed by his mother, is a 50-50 blend of his maternal grandparents' X's - the X's of his mother's parents. That man's Y chromosome, contributed by his father, cannot combine with his X - "apples and oranges" - so, it is a record of his father's line back into prehistory.

          In a woman, her two X chromosomes, one contributed by her mother and one by her father, can combine with one another - "apples and apples" - so the X chromosome is not a record of a mother's line in the same way as the Y chromosome.

          For a record of direct maternal descent, one has to look at the mitochondrial DNA, that is passed, unrecombined, from mothers to their offspring.

          The X chromosome is much much bigger than the Y chromosome and contains a wealth of information of potential genealogical significance. It is sampled in some "paternity" tests where X results can be matched to determine relationship, but a worldwide database of ancestry informative X markers is only beginning to be developed.

          See www.dna-fingerprint.com for developments in the exploitation of the X chromosome for genealogy.

          Tom

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tomcat
            Confusion regarding mtDNA and the X chromosome is routine as the tagline for both is usually "that is inherited from the mother" or some such.

            But there is also some confusion regarding the sex chromosomes.

            In a man, his single X chromosome, contributed by his mother, is a 50-50 blend of his maternal grandparents' X's - the X's of his mother's parents. That man's Y chromosome, contributed by his father, cannot combine with his X - "apples and oranges" - so, it is a record of his father's line back into prehistory.

            In a woman, her two X chromosomes, one contributed by her mother and one by her father, can combine with one another - "apples and apples" - so the X chromosome is not a record of a mother's line in the same way as the Y chromosome.

            For a record of direct maternal descent, one has to look at the mitochondrial DNA, that is passed, unrecombined, from mothers to their offspring.

            The X chromosome is much much bigger than the Y chromosome and contains a wealth of information of potential genealogical significance. It is sampled in some "paternity" tests where X results can be matched to determine relationship, but a worldwide database of ancestry informative X markers is only beginning to be developed.

            See www.dna-fingerprint.com for developments in the exploitation of the X chromosome for genealogy.

            Tom
            Wow, Tom. That sounds very hopeful for the future. Thanks for that info.

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