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H, H* and so on?

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  • H, H* and so on?

    Hi --

    I got an H result on my first mtDNA test, did the H-refine and was still an H; I did another test (I can't remember which at this point, but I did test for HRV2 mutations as well) and am now H*. Can anyone explain the differences involved? I see that someone who is 'just' H has the same HVR1 mutations I do -- 293G,311C.

    Is this because of my HRV2 results (185A,195C,263G,309.1C,309.2C,315.1C)?

    Thanks!

    Ironically enough, I used to work on Nature Genetics but can't seem to figure this one out myself.

    Like many others here, I'm adopted and have very little information about my birth father (although I do know his name), but I know my birth mother's family background fairly well.

    Any insights? Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by msboyd
    Hi --

    I got an H result on my first mtDNA test, did the H-refine and was still an H; I did another test (I can't remember which at this point, but I did test for HRV2 mutations as well) and am now H*. Can anyone explain the differences involved? I see that someone who is 'just' H has the same HVR1 mutations I do -- 293G,311C.

    Is this because of my HRV2 results (185A,195C,263G,309.1C,309.2C,315.1C)?

    Thanks!

    Ironically enough, I used to work on Nature Genetics but can't seem to figure this one out myself.

    Like many others here, I'm adopted and have very little information about my birth father (although I do know his name), but I know my birth mother's family background fairly well.

    Any insights? Thanks!
    It appears that you took the mtDNARefine test which adds the HVR2 mutations, then the H subclade test. The HVR2 mutations don't directly affect your subclade, which is mostly determined by coding-region mutation outside the HVR or the control region. The H* means you have been tested for the 15 or so subclades of H and are not in any of them. I had an H cousin tested and she is an H1*, which means she had the coding region mutation for H1, but not for H1a, H1b, or H1f. (Don't ask me what happened to H1c or H1d.) For more info see: http://www.familytreedna.com/hclade2.html

    Bill Hurst

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    • #3
      Thanks. Does that mean that I may be added to a 'new' subclade down the line as larger sample sizes are analyzed? It just seems like I've done two additional tests and gotten little new information, but I recognize that there are many area that are not particularly well-studied yet.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by msboyd
        Thanks. Does that mean that I may be added to a 'new' subclade down the line as larger sample sizes are analyzed? It just seems like I've done two additional tests and gotten little new information, but I recognize that there are many area that are not particularly well-studied yet.
        Sorry, I don't think more tests by others are going to help you. You just don't have any of the coding-region mutations for any subclades. Sometime in the future they may revise the chart and create new subclades, so you might then get reassigned. But I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon. As for now, you have reached the end point of your branch on the tree. It's just that your branch is shorter than some others.

        Bill Hurst

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        • #5
          I have both the A2706G and C7028T polymorphism which I thought was interesting. They only use one of them for the H haplogroup.

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