Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

When Your Genetic Ancestor and Surname Don't Match

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I'm adopted and recently figured out who my birthfather is (by the power autosomal testing, folks will to share trees, and brute-force building of trees from clues).

    Anyway, my Y67 matches are heavily Butler. I joined the Bulter surname project and fit in nicely with one of the Irish populations there.

    However, my second closest match is a Clancy. The three closest matches (2 Butlers, 1 Clancy) are all GD3. So somewhere at least 4 generations back, there's either an NPE or a Butler chose to take a Clancy surname (or something similar). But it is clear this happened in Ireland.

    As somebody said above, this will be more interesting to figure out than if everything just fell into place!

    Comment


    • #17
      How does one figure out tbeir "Genectic Surname"?

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Jons13 View Post
        How does one figure out tbeir "Genectic Surname"?
        As opposed to my adoptive one? Autosomal and Y-DNA tests, acquiring matches, asking for surnames (or trees) from DNA cousins, doing brute force expansion of the trees, looking for where trees intersect, etc.

        Comment


        • #19
          Count me in.

          The whole point of YDNA testing for me was to figure out what my family name 'really' is: the name my grandfather was born with c1900, or the name his father was born with c1850. I had discovered that the grandfather's surname was completely bogus, assumed by his father two decades earlier - it had then taken me many months to discover the 'official' surname, through the magic of databases and search engines and coincidences piled on coincidences, culminating in finding he had a younger sibling we knew nothing of who used the same assumed surname, and who had been given it as a middle name at birth - often a telltale sign of a 'real' father's surname. (Older siblings all used the 'official' surname; and none of them produced surviving offspring, of course.)

          I wanted to know whether the registered father was the real father, or there might be some truth to the tale that accompanied the assumed surname. You know, high society, la di da

          The official surname is almost as common as Smith, and there is not a hint of a match with any of the many in the project here. The assumed surname is rare, and none of the handful in the project here fits the ethnicity/genealogy.

          But hey ho, came a very close match that fit everything I had expected a match would be (correct geographical origin, socioeconomic characteristics, emigration pattern) ... but had a third surname altogether, not a common one, and a good paper pedigree to go with back to the 1500s. Me, I have no pedigree before the early 1800s. A (supposed at least) 3rd great grandfather with that common 'official' surname, and an even more common given name, and insufficient personal details to find anything more about him.

          The third surname could have snuck in at the 1850 birth, or the birth of his father c1820 ... or long long before. (I have no doubt of the 'legitimacy' of my father's and grandfather's births at least.)

          As it stands, the match and I probably converge sometime around the beginning of records in the common source location in Britain. So either our MRCA predated surnames, or somebody has a bent link in their chain. Probably me

          Now I'm wondering whether my Family Finder test (which the match has already done) will have any tales to tell ...

          Comment


          • #20
            Count me in

            All I want to do is find my 3rd great grandfather's father. I got Y67 tested and only match my cousin and a man named Howard, I am Christopher. Howard nor I match anyone in either project.

            He can prove to a grandfather born in 1785 and I can only prove my line to 1820.

            The kicker for us is we have a DYS 393 = 10 which gives us a Genetic Distance of 2, 3 or 4 in most cases on just that one marker. Even at 67 markers we have a distance of 2, 2 markers being off by one.

            We have no clue who we are genetically. Even at Ysearch the only matches we have is ourselves.

            My 3rd great just fell out of the sky and appeared on earth in 1820 and we do not know when he died. I did stumble on his Civil War service record and we know he survived the war because we have his discharge papers. After the War he must have gone back to his "space ship".

            Comment


            • #21
              Have you looked for his pension records as well? That might show where his pension money was sent, and perhaps even have a death date, if it went on to his widow.

              Originally posted by chrstdvd View Post

              ...My 3rd great just fell out of the sky and appeared on earth in 1820 and we do not know when he died. I did stumble on his Civil War service record and we know he survived the war because we have his discharge papers...

              Comment


              • #22
                we have DYS 393=10

                Originally posted by chrstdvd View Post
                All I want to do is find my 3rd great grandfather's father. I got Y67 tested and only match my cousin and a man named Howard, I am Christopher. Howard nor I match anyone in either project.

                He can prove to a grandfather born in 1785 and I can only prove my line to 1820.

                The kicker for us is we have a DYS 393 = 10 which gives us a Genetic Distance of 2, 3 or 4 in most cases on just that one marker. Even at 67 markers we have a distance of 2, 2 markers being off by one.

                We have no clue who we are genetically. Even at Ysearch the only matches we have is ourselves.

                My 3rd great just fell out of the sky and appeared on earth in 1820 and we do not know when he died. I did stumble on his Civil War service record and we know he survived the war because we have his discharge papers. After the War he must have gone back to his "space ship".
                Hi Chrstdvd,
                My uncles also have DYS 393=10. Could you let me know your markers for DYS 385 and 456? For them it's 11-11 and 12. I've heard that the combi is extremely unusual.
                We are from the Netherlands. But we know my grandfather is not a native, he was sort of adopted. They say he was British.

                Comment

                Working...
                X