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  • YDNA Match Question

    I am a total beginner with DNA results. I have recently received my YDNA67 results. The closest match has a genetic distance = 1. Do I understand correctly that there is a fairly high probability of a common ancestor within 4-8 generations? I ask because my surname is McDonald. Family lore says my GG-grandfather immigrated from Ireland somewhere around the 1860's to Mobile, Alabama. However, my match is a McDaniel who traces his paternal lineage to a man in Virginia in the 1650's. There are also a number of McDaniels (and no McDonalds) with a genetic distance = 2. I'm trying to understand if I am interpreting this correctly. Does this mean that something is incorrect in the family lore and perhaps my known ancestor actually came from Virginia and maybe changed his name? Just trying to figure out what I can learn from the results. Thanks in advance for any help our advice.

  • #2
    If these cases are the very common R1b, a 66 for 67 match would not be very significant. If they are a less common haplogroup, then maybe they would be.

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    • #3
      http://www.clandonald.info/clandonal...ml#scottishmap

      "MacDaniel

      Another form of MacDonald, mainly found in the American South, where the two names were almost completely interchangable. No more than 1 in 10 Daniels originally had a 'Mac' prefix.

      MacDonald

      Derived from the Gaelic: MacDohomhnuill - "son of Donald" - (world ruler). Angus Mor MacDonald, son of Donald MacRanald MacSomerled, was first of the name. Originally the title of the Lords of the Isles, in the 16th century it started being used as a last name by those who could claim to be a "son of Donald". The MacDonnell & MacConnell spellings are mostly found in Clan Donald South, while MacDonell is mainly Glenngarry, but more anciently Keppoch. The MacDaniel derivations are not territorial but are simply due to "free" spelling by clerks, census takers, ships captains, etc., particularly in the American South. There is absolutely no difference in Mac, Mac or even M', and any of these spellings, even with a big D or a little d, may be found today in any of our main branches.
      "

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      • #4
        Thanks

        Originally posted by J Honeychuck View Post
        If these cases are the very common R1b, a 66 for 67 match would not be very significant. If they are a less common haplogroup, then maybe they would be.
        Thank you. I know I am R1b so perhaps I'm reading too much into it.

        Comment


        • #5
          McDaniel/McDonald

          Originally posted by prairielad View Post
          http://www.clandonald.info/clandonal...ml#scottishmap

          "MacDaniel

          Another form of MacDonald, mainly found in the American South, where the two names were almost completely interchangable. No more than 1 in 10 Daniels originally had a 'Mac' prefix.

          MacDonald

          Derived from the Gaelic: MacDohomhnuill - "son of Donald" - (world ruler). Angus Mor MacDonald, son of Donald MacRanald MacSomerled, was first of the name. Originally the title of the Lords of the Isles, in the 16th century it started being used as a last name by those who could claim to be a "son of Donald". The MacDonnell & MacConnell spellings are mostly found in Clan Donald South, while MacDonell is mainly Glenngarry, but more anciently Keppoch. The MacDaniel derivations are not territorial but are simply due to "free" spelling by clerks, census takers, ships captains, etc., particularly in the American South. There is absolutely no difference in Mac, Mac or even M', and any of these spellings, even with a big D or a little d, may be found today in any of our main branches.
          "
          Thank you for responding. Yes, I am aware that McDaniel and McDonald are variants of the same surname and very common. What triggered the original question is the apparent mismatch on the common ancestor if the match is relatively close since my g-g-grandfather supposedly arrived over 200 years after the match's paternal relative. Am I going to far with the match results? Thank you again.

          Comment


          • #6
            This where SNPs might (but only might) help.

            STRs can possibly mutate back, so it is impossible to draw more definite conclusions than what you already know (that you are closely related).

            What does Family Finder say?

            Mr. W

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mcdodav View Post
              I am a total beginner with DNA results. I have recently received my YDNA67 results. The closest match has a genetic distance = 1. Do I understand correctly that there is a fairly high probability of a common ancestor within 4-8 generations? I ask because my surname is McDonald. Family lore says my GG-grandfather immigrated from Ireland somewhere around the 1860's to Mobile, Alabama. However, my match is a McDaniel who traces his paternal lineage to a man in Virginia in the 1650's. There are also a number of McDaniels (and no McDonalds) with a genetic distance = 2. I'm trying to understand if I am interpreting this correctly. Does this mean that something is incorrect in the family lore and perhaps my known ancestor actually came from Virginia and maybe changed his name? Just trying to figure out what I can learn from the results. Thanks in advance for any help our advice.
              Your case in interesting and if you end up finding out one way or another what the answer is then it would be helpful to the genealogical community if you keep us updated with your findings.

              Dr. Doug McDonald, the admin of the Clan Donald USA Genetic Genealogy Project at http://dna-project.clan-donald-usa.org/ would be able to help you the most but we might be able to help you out some before you contact him. Do you have a kit number you are willing to share? Are you in any of the DNA projects? Have your matches had a 111 marker test? Do you have Census records and the death record of your GG-Grandfather?

              Comment


              • #8
                Here are comments Dr. Doug McDonald has a about 111 STR markers and BigY on GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives site that you might want to keep in mind for later -


                The answer to your BigY question is .... NO ... UNLESS you can get many more BigYs
                fro people in the same haplogroup, and CAREFULLY analyze all of them to determine
                which SNPs are reliable and which are not. You simply cannot determine how related people are from the analyzed data FTDNA provides. This is because they don't take into account nocalls properly. The info is there in the raw data download, however. If you provide, say, 10 or 15 raw data zip files I could provide an analysis for you.

                In the Clan Donald project we can't get to 2-3 generations with only pairs ....
                but its very close to that.

                Doug McDonald
                http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.co...-09/1441301867

                I should add this: once you DO manage to get a good handle on a set of reliable BigY SNPs
                for people with a MRCA in the last 2000 or so years, it turns out that the discrimination
                power of them is about equal to that of 111 STRs. So you can average the TMRCA values
                from the two methods and get a result that is 1.414 times more accurate. This really does work!

                Doug McDonald
                http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.co...-09/1441380557

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