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Native Origins and GEDmatch

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Robinfstl View Post
    I don't wish to belong to any particular tribe. I just want to learn more in general. I have been in talks recently with someone claiming to be my birth mother, long story but some things do not add up and somethings do. She is from a village in Nicaragua called Diriomo. It had a large population of indigenous people. I wish I could find more people from there to see if I had any relations to those DNA samples.
    Have you asked her to get a Family Finder test to see if you share 50%?

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    • #47
      She is very poor, lives in a small town in Managua. I was connected with her by a woman who translated a book for an author in the UK. This translator is American and asked around ( I have her name only) and was able to track down a woman who said she was my mother.
      She does not have a phone, and I can contact her through her children,'who have Facebook but rarely are on because they do not have Internet access. As I've learned, people from Diriomo no longer consider or appreciate their Indian heritage and will deny any indigenous heritage.


      Originally posted by Armando View Post
      Have you asked her to get a Family Finder test to see if you share 50%?

      Comment


      • #48
        The best I have is I was matched on FF to a 3-4th cousin whose family is from a town called Diria, which is the sister town to the place my possible birth mother is from. We are not having luck connecting his family with her family names, though.


        Originally posted by Armando View Post
        Have you asked her to get a Family Finder test to see if you share 50%?

        Comment


        • #49
          Asked Logan this question, his answer (could use some help understanding it):

          Yes, I have treated it as the same.

          It is interesting, from a theoretical point of view.
          And, maybe many people in 'A2w' show a small degree of heteroplasmy at '7124';
          but only in your sample has the level come up as significant.

          On www.phylotree.org brackets () are put around defining mutation that 'do not run true';
          so maybe you wil see '(7124)' in the future.





          Originally posted by Armando View Post
          In post #10 you show to have A7124R and G11016A but A2W is defined by A7124G G11016A. See A2W at http://www.phylotree.org/tree/subtree_N.htm which Blaine Bettinger also showed at http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com...esearch-paper/

          Ian Logan also shows A2W to be defined by A7124G G11016A at http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_..._sequences.htm

          I'm wondering if there was miscommunication somewhere or if A7124R and A7124G are considered the same mutation.

          What do you get when you use the tool at http://dna.jameslick.com/mthap/ ? The FTDNA instructions are at http://dna.jameslick.com/mthap/FASTA.html

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Robinfstl View Post
            Asked Logan this question, his answer (could use some help understanding it):

            Yes, I have treated it as the same.

            It is interesting, from a theoretical point of view.
            And, maybe many people in 'A2w' show a small degree of heteroplasmy at '7124';
            but only in your sample has the level come up as significant.

            On www.phylotree.org brackets () are put around defining mutation that 'do not run true';
            so maybe you wil see '(7124)' in the future.
            Right, I figured out that he was treating A7124R and A7124G as the same mutation as I had mentioned in post #45. It's still good to get a confirmation and the way he explained it to you should remove doubt about the way you might see it in the future which could be as '(7124)'.

            Originally posted by Robinfstl View Post
            She is very poor, lives in a small town in Managua. I was connected with her by a woman who translated a book for an author in the UK. This translator is American and asked around ( I have her name only) and was able to track down a woman who said she was my mother.
            She does not have a phone, and I can contact her through her children,'who have Facebook but rarely are on because they do not have Internet access. As I've learned, people from Diriomo no longer consider or appreciate their Indian heritage and will deny any indigenous heritage.
            I'm sorry to hear that. All of it is very unfortunate. I know of Latin Americans that want to deny their Native American ancestry but no one with as much your mother likely has. Normally they have less than 30% when they want to deny it.

            Lately none of the DNA companies have taken advantage of the native Mexican populations of the scientific study in Moreno-Estrada et al. which makes me think that even if they were to do that for Nicaraguans it might be many years until they are part of the reference populations or that enough Nicaraguans will take part in DNA testing that you will be able to determine much more than you have found out. So be patient and don't expect too much while still searching and investigating.

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