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Why is Y-DNA so much more expensive?

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  • Why is Y-DNA so much more expensive?

    Hello there,

    I am a newbie in genealogy and ordered a FF test this weekend because I am interested in "my origins" and in finding other relatives.
    I am also thinking about ordering another additional test as there are two others available, the Y-DNA and the mtDNA.
    When I look at the price I see that mtDNA is much cheaper. Does that mean that I get more profound information from Y-DNA testing?

  • #2
    There could be other factors, but different test types are done using different lab equipment dedicated to it, use different reactants, and take different time to complete...

    W. (Mr.)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dna View Post
      There could be other factors, but different test types are done using different lab equipment dedicated to it, use different reactants, and take different time to complete...

      W. (Mr.)
      So Y-DNA testing does not mean having more datas than mtDNA testing? Just different (male/female line) type of datas?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by M.B. View Post
        So Y-DNA testing does not mean having more datas than mtDNA testing? Just different (male/female line) type of datas?
        Tests like Y-DNA12, Y-DNA37, Y-DNA67, and Y-DNA111 test STRs. From 12 markers to 111 markers are being tested.

        The mtDNA test is for SNPs. Depending on the test, either 1143 SNPs or 16569 SNPs.

        There is a Big Y test for Y chromosome SNPs...

        One test could be apples, another could be oranges. Please take a look at
        http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Y_chromosome_DNA_tests
        http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Mitochondrial_DNA_tests

        W. (Mr.)

        P.S.
        Everybody has mtDNA.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dna View Post
          Tests like Y-DNA12, Y-DNA37, Y-DNA67, and Y-DNA111 test STRs. From 12 markers to 111 markers are being tested.

          The mtDNA test is for SNPs. Depending on the test, either 1143 SNPs or 16569 SNPs.

          There is a Big Y test for Y chromosome SNPs...

          One test could be apples, another could be oranges. Please take a look at
          http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Y_chromosome_DNA_tests
          http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Mitochondrial_DNA_tests

          W. (Mr.)

          P.S.
          Everybody has mtDNA.
          SNPs and STRs...
          I guess I have a lot to learn...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by M.B. View Post
            SNPs and STRs...
            I guess I have a lot to learn...
            Enjoy!

            W. (Mr.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by M.B. View Post
              SNPs and STRs...
              I guess I have a lot to learn...
              https://sites.google.com/site/wheato...etic-genealogy

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              • #8
                Originally posted by M.B. View Post
                SNPs and STRs...
                I guess I have a lot to learn...
                M.B., try these sites for help learning about genealogical DNA testing:
                1. International Society of Genetic Genealogists
                See the Newbie section there, including the Glossary, where they have these definitions:
                • Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP): (pronounced snip) A SNP test confirms your haplogroup by determining if a SNP has mutated from its derived or ancestral state. A SNP is usually found on a different area of the Y-chromosome than where the Y-STR markers are. Sometimes, a SNP may cause a null result on a marker.
                • Short tandem repeat: Patterns in the DNA sequence which repeat over and over again in tandem, i.e., right after each other. Typically the repeat motif is less than six base pairs long. By counting the repeats, one gets an allele value which is given in an individual's haplotype. STRs are also known as microsatellites and simple sequence repeats (SSRs).

                2. Another good site to learn is the "Beginner's Guide to Genetic Genealogy," by Kelly Wheaton. See Lessons 3 and 4 on Exploring the Y.

                Oops, I see that Mr. Barry beat me posting to the latter site.
                Last edited by KATM; 29 June 2015, 04:19 PM. Reason: punctuation!

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