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  • Help with results...

    I just got back my mtDNA results (I'm a female and that's all I can have done) and am trying to pull as much info as possible from them. My haplogroup is HV1 and from what I've gathered, it is not a common one, from Europe and that some decendant lineages of the "original" group appean in the Near East - which would be where? They say it might be "one of the original mitrochondial haplogroups in Europe and likely pre-dates" farming. Also, what do I interpret that to mean? Meat eaters? Wanderers? Vegetarians? Cave Men? The info seems extraordinarily vague.
    Also my sequence has three mutations but I cannot determine through any recsearch I've done so far, what are relevant about the mutations. They are:
    16067T, 16183C, 16189C and 16519C.
    I know it related to the "pairs" but what is the relevance of the location of the mutation? What do they signify, if anything? Is that an intermarriage with a different haplogroup? Is it a "normal" mutation? Does it signify a specific period of time that can be measured in hundreds or thousands of years?
    So far, I got nothing. Anyone with more knowledge, please help.

  • #2
    I can't answer your questions but have you looked at mitosearch.org? If you click on the Search By Haplogroup tab and select your haplogroup you'll see where others in your group come from.

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    • #3
      mitosearch not too helpful

      Thanks for your quick response.... mitosearch can hook me up with "genetic cousins" as they say, but it doesn't give me any additional information about WHY these people might be related. Also the majority of people who are a match for my haplogroup (HV1) have also done HVR2 tests. I've ordered a "refine" but don't know what additional I'll get.

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      • #4
        Help explaining where mutations take place

        Is there any significance as to where along the long string of base pairs the mutations occur? What does it mean? Why does HV1 occur less frequently in Europe - does occur less frequently everywhere? HELP.

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        • #5
          Mutations are purely random events, so there is nothing particular or significant about where they are. They simply help determine your haplogroup, ie which branch of the tree you belong to. Most Europeans belong to group H, and a fair number to V, which are sisters to your haplogroup HV. Saying that your haplogroup was one of the original haplogroups of Europe and most likely predates farming means that either haplogroup HV came to Europe with the first migration of humans into Europe some 40,000 years ago, or was born in Europe very early. It came or appeared in Europe much earlier than the spread of agriculture (less than 10,000 years ago), so it did certainly not originate with potential movements of people bringing agriculture from the near east into Europe around that period.

          MtDNA mutations don't say much about recent origins (unlike Y chromosome STR), so the matches you see on mitosearch and the like do not mean much more than saying that you had a common female ancestor a few thousand years ago. They simply help pinpoint a potential place of origin of the maternal line. Because it does not have the frequencies of, say, group H, I do not think that haplogroup HV has been studied in details.

          cacio

          cacio

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          • #6
            Mutations and Haplos

            Mutations are purely random events, so there is nothing particular or significant about where they are. They simply help determine your haplogroup, ie which branch of the tree you belong to.

            So is it geographic location and combinations of certain mutations that comprise a haplogroup?

            I know you're new too, but so far I've got nothing.
            No responses to questions and finding it hard to cull research in layman's terms.

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            • #7
              I’m not an expert either but, yes, basically, it’s a combination of mutations that make up a haplogroup. But not geographic location. Location has nothing to do with it. Mutations are simply changes in DNA. For example, there was a woman who experienced a change in her DNA when she was in her mother’s womb. So she passed down that new DNA to her offspring and it spread from there. Scientists gave a name to that one group that shares similar mutations. In your case it's HV1.

              When you look at the mitosearch.org site and click on the Search by Haplogroup tab, you can see which countries your genetic cousins come from. I would guess that's where your haplogroup occurs the most. It's probably not Europe. That's probably why they said that.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jezgirl
                Mutations are purely random events, so there is nothing particular or significant about where they are. They simply help determine your haplogroup, ie which branch of the tree you belong to.

                So is it geographic location and combinations of certain mutations that comprise a haplogroup?

                I know you're new too, but so far I've got nothing.
                No responses to questions and finding it hard to cull research in layman's terms.
                It may help if you keep reminding yourself that HV1 was an actual living female person who was born with a mutation in her mtDNA that was passed on to all of her children. She obviously had at least one daughter to pass that mtDNA on to the next generation, etc. You are one of those direct female to female line descendants. She has been prolific enough that a significant number of people now have the marker and you are all placed in a "clan" designated "HV1". By studying the best known information where the ancestors of each person now testing "HV1" came from, the mapping of these locations may suggest a location for the birth of HV1. I hope this is of help to you. My apologies if this is more basic than what you were looking for.

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