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mtDNA of nomads of Eurasian steppes?

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  • #16
    Rainbow: I found that to be equally frustrating. It seems that in science shows for the public, the narrators will say that DNA matches or doesn't match, but they NEVER give the viewer any more information. I don't think they respect their viewers enough to know that some of us might want a few more details.

    Timothy Peterman

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    • #17
      pie chart of haplogroups

      I downloaded a haplogroup series of charts from one of the messages on this forum, but I don't have the website URL to relocate the source. It i s starting to look old (2005). And it is stated that some haplogroup info is catchall, due to lack of extensive info.

      But, the single chart for mtDNA shows pie charts for Altai and Mongolia, for example. And both show slices of Europeann mtDNA haplotypes, although less so for Mongolia. That is, there is a noticeable amount of Caucasian haplotypes there, e.g. U & H.

      U5b2 & R1a1

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      • #18
        Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
        I downloaded a haplogroup series of charts from one of the messages on this forum, but I don't have the website URL to relocate the source. It i s starting to look old (2005). And it is stated that some haplogroup info is catchall, due to lack of extensive info.

        But, the single chart for mtDNA shows pie charts for Altai and Mongolia, for example. And both show slices of Europeann mtDNA haplotypes, although less so for Mongolia. That is, there is a noticeable amount of Caucasian haplotypes there, e.g. U & H.

        U5b2 & R1a1
        I would be very happy if it turns out to be H. Especially if it's H1. (that's my haplogroup).
        I did read on the genographic project site that mtdna H does make up about 20% of southwest Asian lineages and 15% of the mtdna in Central Asia and about 5% of the mtdna in Northern Asia.

        https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/...hic/atlas.html
        click on that and then on 'genetic markers' then on mtdna H, and scroll down to the ending where it mentions that.

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        • #19
          another look...

          I just looked again at my download (WorldHaplogroupsMaps.pdf) at upper Central Asia, and noticed an interesting tidbit. A pie chart for the (disappearing) Kets, who are linguistically distantly related to the Navajo and Apaches, show around a combined 45% having U & H mtDNA.

          U5b2 & R1a1*

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