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will someone please answer this thanks

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  • will someone please answer this thanks

    #1 02-25-2006, 08:42 PM
    heyllo22
    Registered User Join Date: Feb 2006
    Posts: 3

    autosomes,inactivated x

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    What about autosomes,why is one x inactivated?And who are the other x's inherited from?And then where do get the x's and randomly inactivated x's from?

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  • #2
    This forum is not really the place to gain a basic education about dna. There are plenty of sites, which google finds very easily, that explain these sorts of things extremely well.

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    • #3
      This is the FamilyTreeDna Tutorial page
      http://www.familytreedna.com/dna101.html


      and the faqs
      http://www.ftdna.com/faq.html
      Last edited by M.O'Connor; 28 February 2006, 09:41 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by heyllo22
        #1 02-25-2006, 08:42 PM
        heyllo22
        Registered User Join Date: Feb 2006
        Posts: 3

        autosomes,inactivated x

        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        What about autosomes,why is one x inactivated?And who are the other x's inherited from?And then where do get the x's and randomly inactivated x's from?

        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Autosomes are those chromosomes within the cell nucleus including the sex-chromosomes x and y. These nuclear chromosomes derive 50-50 from one's parents. Normally, males have one x and one y and females have two x chromosomes. Females inherit one x from their mother and one from their father. Because females have two x's, those x's can recombine, but one x is inactivated so that female offspring receive an x that is a blend of paternal and maternal x. Because x cannot combine with y, the male y constitutes a record of direct descent on the paternal line. The mitochondrial DNA is outside the cell nucleus and normally is not subject to recombination, it is passed from a mother to her offspring but only passed on by her female offspring to their children, hence it constitutes a record of direct descent on the maternal line.

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