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  • Misspelled Surname

    Greetings, I am in the process of returning my dna samples for testing. I have a weak and probably inaccurate paper trail to my grandfather due to the misspelling of his name on his Naturalization papers c.1887. I may have the root of the name. He later in 1912 further changed and embellished his name (probably illegally) to our present family name....which is not our original name. (We thought he might be hiding from the authorities.)
    Question; When my test results are in how should one proceed in attempting to find-match the original surname? Thanks.

  • #2
    People have genetic matches with people of different surnames.

    Our Genetic groups have drifted and spread across europe, and wherever, long before we started picking Surnames.

    People who match you genetically, and also match your surname are generally thought to be related to you sometime after 900 AD when surnames were becomming popular.

    if you do a search of your dna sequence in the world bank you could match up with few possibilities. You would need more than 12 DSY numbers for refining your genetic search.
    Last edited by M.O'Connor; 21 February 2006, 07:17 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by fantome
      Greetings, I am in the process of returning my dna samples for testing. I have a weak and probably inaccurate paper trail to my grandfather due to the misspelling of his name on his Naturalization papers c.1887. I may have the root of the name. He later in 1912 further changed and embellished his name (probably illegally) to our present family name....which is not our original name. (We thought he might be hiding from the authorities.)
      Question; When my test results are in how should one proceed in attempting to find-match the original surname? Thanks.

      a couple of letters off doesnt make a different namei would concider it the same name

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      • #4
        In an old census, they misspelled my paternal grandfather's surname. Instead of being the distinctive surname he had, it now became a punctuation mark.

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        • #5
          The government listed my grandfather was from South Carolina when he clearly said South America.

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