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Matches and genetic distance

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  • #46
    No matches!

    I had my mtDNA (well my mother's actually), and we found not a single match in the whole database. Looking around the web with Google, I found almost no mention of the marker that my mother carries... 316G. I've seen it show up in some populations, but never with a chunk fo other markers that tend to show up together. One paper linked this marker to African pygmies. Well my mom has tiny feet, so you never know, but I'm pretty sure she's Germanic/Scandinavian. haha

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    • #47
      Originally posted by heintz57
      I had my mtDNA (well my mother's actually), and we found not a single match in the whole database.
      If you give us your mtDNA haplogroup and all of your mutations, perhaps we can help. Or, better, did you automatically upload your mtDNA information into MitoSearch from your FTDNA Personal Page?

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      • #48
        [QUOTE=heintz57 Looking around the web with Google, I found almost no mention of the marker that my mother carries... 316G. I've seen it show up in some populations, but never with a chunk fo other markers that tend to show up together. One paper linked this marker to African pygmies. Well my mom has tiny feet, so you never know, but I'm pretty sure she's Germanic/Scandinavian. haha[/QUOTE]
        Hey, no tiny feet here ! See above your post, I've got the 316G. My Mom - British-Scandinavian basically. What else do you have as markers with the 316G ?

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        • #49
          Originally posted by ragnar
          Both of you are lucky to have so many matches. I have no matches for my H*. The closest I have are 5 people who have 4 out of the 5 HVR1 mutations I have.

          the key to all of this is small locational studies where people lived so wecan find matches to others
          small i mean a tri twon atrea or county with correspoding genealogical research
          i do the genealogy of chelsea revere and winthrop ma. and have 140,000 names

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          • #50
            Sometimes when I joined this forum I remember that I read that 12/12 match meant a common ancestor 2000 years ago.

            Now I notice that FTDNA gives quite lower figures, and they differ from the figures achived from another link supported by FTDNA in their tutorial (see below)

            http://www.familytreedna.com/faq2.html:
            12/12 match gives 27 generations at 95% probability, or 675-810 years (when one generation is calculated as 25-30 years long).
            11/12 match gives 47 generations at 95% probability, or
            1175-1410 years.
            Also at the first line of the actual table you read 10 of 10, I suppose it should mean 10 of 12.

            http://nitro.biosci.arizona.edu/ftdna/TMRCA.html:
            12/12 match gives 62 generations or 1550-1860 years.
            11/12 match (both 1 one step mismatch and 1 two step mismatch) gives 103 generations with 95% probability, which means a time interval of 2600-3100 years.

            Why this difference?

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            • #51
              I guess having the same surname would make a difference. Could be that the first estimate is for two people sharing the same surname, while the second estimate is for two people matching but with different surnames.

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              • #52
                From your personal page under Understanding matches with different surnames, you still find this info: "The range of generations for the common ancestor extends to 76.9 generations, or almost 2000 years for those cases where there is not a surname in common."

                FTDNA doesn't mention anything about surnames and MRCA in http://www.familytreedna.com/faq2.html , but they have one explanation for 37 and 67 markers:

                "FamilyTreeDNA's 37 and 67 marker tests point to a much lower number of generations to the most recent common ancestor than other commercially available tests. We use exacting statistics appropriate for the non-independent transfer of genetic material on the Y Chromosome."

                Strange, as FTDNA:s amount of generations are even lower for the respective matches given by high mutation rate in http://nitro.biosci.arizona.edu/ftdna/TMRCA.html . Is FTDNA really that good?

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                • #53
                  Sicilian with English matches on both the mtDNA and Y-DNA sides.

                  I am finding that many/most of my exact matches are coming from England. Second coming from Scotland. Then third coming from either Ireland and France. Some even coming from Germany, Wales, and Holland. The North Sea / English Channel looks like a comon place to find my genetic cousins. All my life until I got DNA tested I thought I was a MED. I'm from the Nth/Wst area of Europe. Comparing with other members in my haplogroups on both sides - I'm finding strong connections with the Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Gallic cultures.

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