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  • mtDNA HapK Curious

    I have just received my HV2 mtDNA results and I have to admit that its just numbers to me right now. I need some help in understanding what I have.
    HVR1 mutations
    16093 C
    16224 C
    16331 C
    16519 C

    HRV2 Mutations
    073 G
    263 G
    309.1 C
    315.1 C
    497 T
    524.1 C
    524.2 A

    Are these results expected with Hap K? Are they unusual? Any particular genetic markers pointing in a geographical driection?
    Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am headed over to a Hap K subclade chart now to see what I can find there too.
    Thanks,
    Bob

  • #2
    Bob: You need to post your results to Mitosearch.. there you will see your matches, which I think you may have quite a few of. As to your results being typical, I am also a K and have all of your numbers plus 2 extra in HVR2 and 1 less in HVR1. Incidently, I belive you have a typo with the 331, it is most likely 311.

    Comment


    • #3
      Bob, it looks to me like you are likely either a K1a1a or a K1a4 on Dr. Behar's new chart. The 16224C, 16311C, 16519C, 073G, 263G, and 315.1C put you into K. You don't have 146C, so you are not a K2. You have 497T, so you are in K1a. From this point the subclades are defined by coding region mutations, which would be revealed by a subclade test which may be offered in the future. If you have mutation 11914, you would be in K1a1, and your 16093C would put you in K1a1a. However, if you have 11485 you would be in K1a4. In this case your 16093C would put you on an unlabled branch of K1a4.

      Behar excluded 309.1C and the 524 insertions in creating his chart. Those, and your other mutations, are quite common in K.

      I've said elsewhere that I don't think the Behar paper has enough British Isles data to get the subclades too far.

      This certainly doesn't help with a geographical origin. Sorry 'bout that.

      Bill Hurst

      Comment


      • #4
        Wonderful responses everyone. Thanks a lot. I believe I am getting a small handle on this now.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bill Hurst
          Bob, it looks to me like you are likely either a K1a1a or a K1a4 on Dr. Behar's new chart. The 16224C, 16311C, 16519C, 073G, 263G, and 315.1C put you into K. You don't have 146C, so you are not a K2. You have 497T, so you are in K1a. From this point the subclades are defined by coding region mutations, which would be revealed by a subclade test which may be offered in the future. If you have mutation 11914, you would be in K1a1, and your 16093C would put you in K1a1a. However, if you have 11485 you would be in K1a4. In this case your 16093C would put you on an unlabled branch of K1a4.

          Behar excluded 309.1C and the 524 insertions in creating his chart. Those, and your other mutations, are quite common in K.

          I've said elsewhere that I don't think the Behar paper has enough British Isles data to get the subclades too far.

          This certainly doesn't help with a geographical origin. Sorry 'bout that.

          Bill Hurst
          I've got similar #'s to Bob Swinea.Am I an Ashkenazi Jew? Nobody ever told me.Many K's in Ireland have this type of MtK also.(Ireland has 10 haplogroups in it-almost all of Europe).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Jambalaia32
            I've got similar #'s to Bob Swinea.Am I an Ashkenazi Jew? Nobody ever told me.Many K's in Ireland have this type of MtK also.(Ireland has 10 haplogroups in it-almost all of Europe).

            Hi,
            Let me see if I can distill my personal research findings over the past few months. There were a significant number of Hap Ks in southwest Europe before the ending of the last big ice age. Doesn't make you [or me] "Jewish" as I understand that that comes through both blood and religion. That particular term came much later in human history as we humans tried to divide ourselves up according to "race". Under the skin there is no race, creed, or religion only DNA that has travelled far and wide. Evidently there was some significant mixing of the Haplotypes during everyone's stay in Southwest Europe. I'm not educated enough on the subject to comment further. Sorry. What I know is that my Hap K sojourned there and then moved into the British Isles then to America where it ended up in my maternal Cherokee lineage.
            Amazing stuff...
            Peace to All,
            Bob

            Comment


            • #7
              Bob, I was doing some haplogroup research on the scholarly journal databases offered by my public library and noticed there were several articles about Native American genetics in a journal called "The American Journal of Physical Anthropology".

              http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jtoc/28130/

              Kelley

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jambalaia32
                I've got similar #'s to Bob Swinea.Am I an Ashkenazi Jew? Nobody ever told me.Many K's in Ireland have this type of MtK also.(Ireland has 10 haplogroups in it-almost all of Europe).
                Exactly what is your mtDNA? Are you on MitoSearch? Have you joined the K project from your FTDNA personal page using the blue Join button? I can't comment based on the term "similar"?

                I remember there being a Jewish Lord Mayor of Dublin. He was probably Ashkenazi and Irish. Sometime we (I) use phrases like Ashkenazi and Irish without all the necessary qualifiers.

                Bill Hurst

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