Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Finding Paternal Grandpa..

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Finding Paternal Grandpa..

    I am female, and have done the Autosomal Family Finder test. I would like to identify my grandpa on my paternal line but have a major problem. My father, who was illegitimate, never knew his father, and he is now deceased. His only known siblings had a different father. I am an only child so have no brothers to test for Y-DNA. Do I stand any chance at all of discovering his paternal line?

  • #2
    Presumably, you know something about your mother's side of the family and your paternal grandmother. You need to get all the information you can assemble from the paper trail about their ancestors. Then you have the information that can help tell you whether your Family Finder matches are matching your mother's side, your paternal grandmother's lines or your paternal grandfather's lines.

    It would probably be a good thing to test your mother and some of your father's half-siblings. Then when you share a match with your mother or one of your father's half-siblings, you can say that those matches almost certainly aren't coming from your unknown paternal grandfather's line. If you mother is no longer alive, then you could test one or more of her siblings.

    Once you have matches that you don't share with your mother/her siblings or your father's half-siblings, those matches are potentially coming from your paternal grandfather. Those are the matches you want to concentrate on communicating with to see what information they have that could help you. For instance, among those matches look for ancestors they have who lived in the city or area where your father was born.

    Also, other clues can be gotten from your myOrigins results, especially when compared with your mother's/her siblings and your father's half-siblings. If there is some type of ancestry that you see in your myOrigins results that aren't showing up at all in your mother's or your father's half-siblings, that may mean the ancestry is coming from your paternal grandfather. For instance, if your myOrigins gives you some Southern European or African or other ancestry that doesn't show up at all in your mother's results or those of your father's half-siblings, that would be a clue that that ancestry is coming from your unknown paternal grandfather.

    Add that clue to communicating with the matches you've tagged as potentially through your paternal grandfather. See if any of those potential matches through your paternal grandfather share that ancestry and also have ancestors who lived in the area where your father was born. That may narrow down to a certain line in your matches' trees that may be related to your paternal grandfather.

    Concentrate on the closest matches, hopefully 2nd cousin or better, but don't ignore any matches that are potentially coming from your paternal grandfather's lines. Even distant cousins may provide small pieces that help you solve the puzzle.

    Finally, also test at 23andMe and Ancestry.com, if you haven't already. You want to cast as a wide a net as possible. Testing at all three companies covers everyone who's in the major commercial databases.
    Last edited by MMaddi; 12 September 2014, 02:47 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      re: Finding Paternal Grandpa

      Thank you for your reply.
      Quote:[COLOR="Black"]It would probably be a good thing to test your mother and some of your father's half-siblings. Then when you share a match with your mother or one of your father's half-siblings, you can say that those matches almost certainly aren't coming from your unknown paternal grandfather's line. If you mother is no longer alive, then you could test one or more of her siblings]/COLOR]

      I should have mentioned that I have no known relatives to test, my father's half brothers are both deceased, the son of one also dead at age 42. I have no idea if there are children from the other half brother as my mother and her family had no contact at all with their side of the family, due to divorce, which was why I never got the chance to know my father. I was told years ago that he was dead, and found out too late that I had been lied to. So I and my children are the only one's left. I should add that I am now in my 70's.

      Comment


      • #4
        Based on the information in your second post, I don't think you'll succeed in finding out anything about your unknown paternal grandfather. You have to be able to isolate your matches to your paternal grandfather's line. To do that, you have to test known relatives in the other three grandparents' lines.

        It will be a total guessing game to isolate your matches to your paternal grandfather's line. You don't have any assurance that your guesses are right without relatives from the other lines to test.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Babushka View Post
          I should have mentioned that I have no known relatives to test, my father's half brothers are both deceased, the son of one also dead at age 42. I have no idea if there are children from the other half brother as my mother and her family had no contact at all with their side of the family, due to divorce, which was why I never got the chance to know my father. I was told years ago that he was dead, and found out too late that I had been lied to. So I and my children are the only one's left. I should add that I am now in my 70's.
          You didn't answer if your mother or any of her siblings are alive? Testing them could be some help in determining what matches are from your father's side. If you don't have a name to work with of potential father's to your father and nobody to test other than yourself it will be very, very difficult and take lots of work with only a small chance of finding success, but it is theoretically possible. You would need to test through all 3 autosomal testing companies and hope for a close match. Just having a close match won't be enough though, you will need to be lucky enough that this close match is related to you on your paternal grandfather's side and that they have some knowledge in their biological tree as far as their parents and grandparents and they will need to be willing to communicate this information with you (many people who take these tests choose to not communicate with matches). You will also need somebody very knowledgeable with both DNA and genealogy or you will need to learn these skills yourself.

          You mentioned you never knew your father, sorry to ask this but are you 100% sure he was your biological father? You should start there in making sure. You should test as close a biological relative of your father as you can find who might be willing to DNA test (since you have done the Family Finder test this would also be the test that they would take). A 2nd cousin or closer who is a biological relative of your father is who you would need to test. Look for people who might have a tree on ancestry or look on Facebook to find a close relative of your father, but a 2nd cousin or closer to yourself is what you need if you aren't sure of your father and then you can focus on who your father's father was.

          Comment


          • #6
            The Family Finder test will give you cousins. Some of them will be from your paternal grandfather's relatives.

            As others have stated, you will need to deduce who in the FF are from your paternal grandfather's relatives. To do this you will need to know your pedigree through your other 3 grandparents back several generations, to rule out possible connections through those grandparents.

            I have my mother's test here and have found a couple of 4th cousins 1x removed of hers who have been very enlightening regarding an NPE, but I was only able to understand this connection after spending some time discovering the rest of the pedigree and filling in quite a bit of missing information in the family history.

            It can be done, but you'll have the best chance of succeeding if you enjoy genealogy and doing lots (and lots) of research.

            Fishing in a bigger pond helps. Putting your FF data on gedmatch.com will discover connections to a large pool.

            Comment


            • #7
              It's a real long shot, but researching the period your father was born in thru newspapers local to where your grandmother lived will sometimes turn up social notes, family parties, "home from WW-I and greeted by..." announcements, etc. If your father was the result of a relationship that might give some clues.

              Nursing homes often have records they don't normally mention; personal interviews and comments, etc. If you can make a connection with someone a long time on the staff they may be able to help you.

              Close girlhood friends of your grandmother? Long gone of course, but your grandmothers pregnancy would have had an effect on her friends, perhaps to the point that she was used as a warning story to their own daughters - some of whom might still be around.

              I wouldn't suggest these off-the-wall things if I hadn't seen them occasionally bring results. My family had a story of a "girl and a soldier"... problem is, I then found three ancestors who fit the story!

              Good luck to you,
              miker

              Comment

              Working...
              X