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  • Irish Ancestry Mystery Story

    Irish Ancestry Mystery Story

    I could not find even a close match . . . click, click. So; I tried to write a history that combines what I think I know


    Born around 1860, a Mulatto descendant of the KhoiSan speaking peoples with a genetic motif (L1c Motif = 129 187 189 223 278 294 311 360) of Lubaya from the Kalahari Desert area made it from Alabama to Texas to marry an Irish Mulatto guy born around 1856 in the Houston area with the name of Cotton. The white father of this guy of the same last name came from Mississippi, and his mother was from Texas. Today, the HVR1 mtDNA also contains 38, 86, 224, 293, 519 where 224 is rare in Africa and it is most often seen in Katrine or K motif; 519 is common around the world in Europe and Asia but rare in Africa; 38 is rare in Africa; and 87 is seen in world L groups based on 1998 world forensic statistics. The L1 group (Layla's Clan) is the mother group of all modern haplogroups groups while haplogroup L0 was the first branch to diverge from Eve's family tree. The HVR2 readings are collectively seen in L1 people who do not live in Africa today, HVR2 differences from CRS 73G, 151T, 152C, 182T, 186A, 189C, 195C, 198T, 247A, 263G, 297G, 315.1C, 316A, 522-,523-. The above HVR1 and HVR2 sequence does not match any recent large stationary or migrant groups as is typical of American L1c groups as of my 2005 review.

    <<Alves-Silva et al. (2000), for example, found that 28% of a sample of mainly “white” subjects from Brazil were of recent African maternal ancestry, with substantial variation from region to region. Some lineages could be readily attributed to arrivals from western Africa, which had already been extensively sampled, but almost 50% belonged to haplogroups L1c and L3e, which are rare in western Africa. Their presence at much higher frequencies in small west-central African data sets suggested that the Brazilian L1c and L3e mtDNAs might be of largely west-central African origin (see also Bandelt et al. 2001). Indeed, major sources for Brazilian slaves are thought, on the basis of historical records, to have been Congo and Angola (e.g., Curtin 1969; Thomas 1998). Alves-Silva et al. (2000) predicted that, when these regions were sampled for mtDNA variation, L1c and L3e would be found at high frequencies. L3 (L3b, L3d, L3e)- This haplogroup is east African and it is related with the Bantu expansion
    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1182259 >>

    <<Any visitor to Madison, Texas, (now Orange) in the month of May, 1856, would have hardly imagined that that community was steeped in jealousy and hatred. Only four years earlier, Orange County had cut itself adrift from neighboring Jefferson County and established its county seat at Madison, a prosperous village located on the Sabine River, twelve miles from its mouth, and cooled by the prevailing southerly breezes from Lake Sabine.
    Madison had no log-cabin or unpainted clapboard ugliness. Already a thriving timber products center, it had grown from zero population to 600 in ten years. One early writer praised its fairy-tale appearance, 150 white cottages "ensconced like a duck in a nest of roses" and encircling a mile-long river crescent studded with stately cypresses. Five [stream] saw mills and shingle mills, two shipyards, a dozen other hand-powered industries, stores and cotton warehouses lined the banks of the river where six steamboats and numerous sail craft transported lumber and cotton abroad. A multi-billion foot reservoir of huge, virgin cypress and pine forests abutted the community that had already become the state's leading exporter of lumber, shingles, lathes, fence pickets, barrel staves, and wagon spokes.
    If Madison's idyllic setting belied its ugliness within, it also left as totally inexplicable the strangest circumstances that were ever a party to vigilante violence and twelve assassinations -- a sheriff who, along with his uncle, comprised the most skillful ring of counterfeiters in early-day Texas; a West Texas killer who rode with the Moderators, the party of "law and order;" and a dozen free Mulattoes, who were slaveholders, wealthy cattlemen, and considerably less "black" than the hearts of their persecutors.
    By 1856 Orange County, Texas, had the largest aggregate of "free blacks" in the state, numbering about 100. The nucleus of the Mulatto colony included Aaron, Abner, William, Jesse, and Tapler Ashworth and their children; Hiram Bunch, Gibson Perkins, and Elijah Thomas, all of whom were either brothers, in-laws, or were otherwise closely related. The wives of some of them were white, whereas a few white men in the county had Mulatto wives (mixed marriage was illegal, although seldom enforced). Most of them having arrived in Texas by 1834, a few of them held Mexican land grants. Some had military bounties or land grants from the Republic of Texas, and most of them had served one enlistment in the Texas Army in 1836. While several of mixed ancestry were Mulattoes, others were of quadroon or octaroon ancestry.
    Despite the marriage laws of the state, six of the group had taken white spouses, a continuing process which had left some of them as a whole "three or four generations removed from black blood" (a phrase coined by an early county historian). Except for their disfranchisement from the political and judicial processes, they had gained most of the privileges of whites, including an 1840 enabling act from the Congress of the Texas Republic to circumvent the forced removal of free blacks from the state. Although many of them were widely respected, they still had committed, in the eyes of their neighbors, one cardinal and unforgivable sin -- they had accumulated large tracts of valuable lands and thousand of cattle which were coveted by others.
    Reprinted from W. T. Block, "Meanest Town on The Coast," OLD WEST, Winter, 1979, pp.10ff. Sources: Galveston WEEKLY NEWS and TRI-WEEKLY NEWS, June 1 to July 15, 1856. >>

  • #2
    Originally posted by GregKiroKH
    Irish Ancestry Mystery Story

    I could not find even a close match . . . click, click. So; I tried to write a history that combines what I think I know


    Born around 1860, a Mulatto descendant of the KhoiSan speaking peoples with a genetic motif (L1c Motif = 129 187 189 223 278 294 311 360) of Lubaya from the Kalahari Desert area made it from Alabama to Texas to marry an Irish Mulatto guy born around 1856 in the Houston area with the name of Cotton. The white father of this guy of the same last name came from Mississippi, and his mother was from Texas. Today, the HVR1 mtDNA also contains 38, 86, 224, 293, 519 where 224 is rare in Africa and it is most often seen in Katrine or K motif; 519 is common around the world in Europe and Asia but rare in Africa; 38 is rare in Africa; and 87 is seen in world L groups based on 1998 world forensic statistics. The L1 group (Layla's Clan) is the mother group of all modern haplogroups groups while haplogroup L0 was the first branch to diverge from Eve's family tree. The HVR2 readings are collectively seen in L1 people who do not live in Africa today, HVR2 differences from CRS 73G, 151T, 152C, 182T, 186A, 189C, 195C, 198T, 247A, 263G, 297G, 315.1C, 316A, 522-,523-. The above HVR1 and HVR2 sequence does not match any recent large stationary or migrant groups as is typical of American L1c groups as of my 2005 review.
    Parsons et al., USA Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, African American

    038-086-129-187-189-223-224-278-293-294-311-360 73-151-152-182-186A-189C-195-198-247-263-297-315.1C-316
    16030-16383; 71-340

    and 3 sequences in FBI forensic database, of African-American individuals:

    038-086-129-187-189-223-278-284-293-294-311-360 73-151-152-182-186A-189T-195-198-247-263-297-315.1C-316
    16024-16365; 73-340


    038-086-129-187-189-223-278-284-293-294-311-360-519 73-151-152-182-186A-189C-195-198-247-263-297-309.1C-315.1C-316-523d-524d-527N
    16024-16569; 1-576


    038-086-129-187-189-223-224-278-293-294-311-360 73-151-152-182-186A-189C-195-198-247-263-297-315.1C-316
    16024-16365; 73-340

    all the above sequences were included in SWGDAM, the main collection of the African American mt.
    Last edited by vraatyah; 6 January 2006, 03:11 PM.

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    • #3
      Thanks, I am getting about the same thing

      <<Also similar to many people in K minus the L1c mutations.
      In contrast, American L1b sequences are most often shared with samples from western Africa, where L1b is concentrated (fig. 3; see also fig. 4 of Salas et al. 2002). Shared L1b types are also found in northern Africa; however, in all cases except for one, these also match western Africans, and in the one exception there is also a match with southeastern Africa. Haplogroup L1c, which is likely to be of west-central African origin, is the African mtDNA clade with the most unmatched representatives in America, particularly in South America—only ~17% of American L1c types are shared with Africans. The Angolan sample, however, carries L1c at a frequency of ~21%, which confirms the prediction of Alves-Silva et al. (2000) based on the pattern of L1c lineages in Brazil, where the frequency among mtDNAs of recent African ancestry is ~19%. One L1c3 type matches eight individuals from Bioko (mislabeled as “Bi” in figure 5 of Salas et al. 2002). However, it also matches a number of individuals in Mozambique, suggesting a possible origin in west-central Africa for a lineage that was probably dispersed by the Bantu expansions (Salas et al. 2002). This is reinforced by the discovery of a derivative of this type in Angola. L1c is rare in Mozambique (∼5%), suggesting that it may be a “west-central Bantu” marker that has been brought to southeastern Africa by interaction with western Bantu-speaking communities.
      Both Portugal and the Near East are regions with known historical gene flow from northern Africa, but both were also centers for the importation of slaves. Eurasian L0–L3A are similarly concentrated in the Near East and Iberia.
      All of the Iberian L0–L3A types are shared with either western or southeastern Africans, so that it is possible that all of them might be accounted for by the Atlantic slave trade (Pereira et al. 2000)
      A recent summary of the historical literature suggests that ~62% of slaves came from western Africa to America (~8 million slaves), ~30% from west-central Africa (4 million), and ~8% from southeastern Africa (1 million) (Thomas 1998, p. 806). The North American and Central American source regions are thought likely to have been mainly in western Africa, supplemented substantially in South America by sources in west-central Africa and, to some extent, southeastern Africa.
      The mtDNA composition in America, although indicating only the female line of descent, broadly corroborates historical research. In particular, and unsurprisingly, our admixture estimates, PC plots, and phylogenetic networks all stress the overwhelming impact of western and west-central Africa on the composition of American mtDNAs with recent African ancestry, with a likely small southeastern African component. Western Africa appears to have been the most important source for North and Central America, although, perhaps surprisingly, North America appears to harbor the larger (but probably still a minority) west-central African component. The results from South America are more problematic, but the likely picture appears to be of a large, possibly majority west-central African contribution, with a substantial western African component as well, at least for Brazil. However, the west-central African contribution most likely derives largely from an area that so far has not been sampled for mtDNA variation, such as the Congo basin. A contribution in Brazil from southeastern Africa also seems likely, as suggested by the high level of matching between Brazilian and Mozambican lineages within L3e1>>

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      • #4
        Found link by population dynamics, abt. 1831

        I found my African link. In 1831, a mulatto girl named Tina was born in Alabama. She moved to Anderson, Texas about 1840 with John W. Adkins. They had 8 or 9 children. One was Jhoanna who had long golden red hair. She married Sam Cotton but died early. They had a child named Birdie Cotton who married Thomas Caesar Smith. They had five children. One was my mother. My mtDNA results proved that in 1831, there was a female with African ancestry.

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