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  • #16
    Hi haplogroupc,

    I would be honored to do so. I too attend many pow wows. When I go back east for Tribal Gatherings, I am surrounded by hundreds of cousins and we all look similiar. I have light copper skin, broad nose, flat facial features and very high cheekbones so much so that when I smile my eyes disappear. My hair, now grey was once very dark brown and I have the Cherokee starburst hazel eyes...which I was told years ago by a respected Elder Teacher that this was our original eye color. Who can say for sure? One of my Cherokee maternal lines was thought to have been descended from a full blood from the old village of Tuskeegee (TN). Guess she was mixed too :-)
    Peace,
    Bob

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    • #17
      I don't think I could carry a card.

      Haplogroup A was not present among the original Taino. So only God knows which Indians were imported to get that type in my mitochondriae. It is known that some were imported to PR from Yucatan, so perhaps Maya. But who knows if my specific case was someone who colonized, say, South America, married an Indian from one of the tribes there that did have A, had female descendants move back to the Canary Islands, and then their progeny moved to the island and eventually led to my matrilineal family.

      And who knows if my specific case was someone whose family went straight from where Aiyana was born and raised to the Canary Islands without passing through the new continent. Unlikely, off the wall, but not impossible.

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      • #18
        Hi Eternitat,
        In the good old USA, the ONLY ancestral group that must carry a "card" to prove their descent are American Indians. You can be Swedish, German, British, Irish, Fijian, etc; tell people that you are, and no one will bat an eye. However, tell people that you are an American Indian and the automatic question is, "how much Indian are you?" No other group gets this question If you are American Indian and wish to practice your ancestral religion and it includes the use of eagle/hawk/other selected birds, you better be "carded" or its off to prison after being impoverished by a fine. No one does this to other religious groups; only Native Indians. Its simply a matter of our history in this land and the way things are now. I don't need a card to tell me who I am or where I came from ... its a necessary thing in today's world.
        Peace,
        Bob

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        • #19
          mtDNA A in Puerto Rico

          The highest percentage of mtDNA in Puerto Rico is "A"
          http://proyectosadnhispanos.bravehos...RHapmtDNA.html

          Another interesting article:
          http://www.taino-tribe.org/pr-taino-dna.htm

          Surprising but True!

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          • #20
            Oh I know. Even with the rather small presence of Indians there (as compared to many other countries in Latin America who have large extant Indian populations with a lot of influence).

            So I wonder if this A came from somewhere else. Imported Indians from Yucatan? Maybe a bottleneck effect from some colonists?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Victor
              The highest percentage of mtDNA in Puerto Rico is "A"
              http://proyectosadnhispanos.bravehos...RHapmtDNA.html

              Another interesting article:
              http://www.taino-tribe.org/pr-taino-dna.htm

              Surprising but True!
              Victor,

              Those articles are eye-opening. It's clear that there is more haplogroup A in Puerto Rico than any other haplogroup. It's also clear that there are more Native Americans in Puerto Rico than any other group. The idea that there is no haplogroup A and that there is very little Native American is incorrect. I've read that the Spaniards said that the Taino Indians had all died so that they could get permission from Spain to take the land. But DNA has proven that they've been there all along.

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              • #22
                I did read in more than one other study that in the graves of Tainos in PR and RD they found no A. And that in the modern Yanomami they found no A either.

                However, that can technically be due to bottlenecking.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Eternitat
                  Oh I know. Even with the rather small presence of Indians there (as compared to many other countries in Latin America who have large extant Indian populations with a lot of influence).

                  So I wonder if this A came from somewhere else. Imported Indians from Yucatan? Maybe a bottleneck effect from some colonists?
                  Not necessarily. Contrary to the idea of the Tainos being an isolated people new historical and archeaological evidences suggest a dynamic exchange between islanders and main land inhabitants. Read the following:
                  http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/41/238.html

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Eternitat
                    I did read in more than one other study that in the graves of Tainos in PR and RD they found no A. And that in the modern Yanomami they found no A either.

                    However, that can technically be due to bottlenecking.
                    It was the Yanomami who lacked the mtDNA A.
                    That only means that the Yanomami are not the ancestors of the Tainos.

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                    • #25
                      I did read somewhere that the Yanomami were their ancestors due to the language and customs. Kinda like Latin being the ancestor of Spanish and other Romance languages.

                      While it is possible that the Yanomami were not the only ancestors of the Tainos, it is suspected to be likelier that the A was introduced from other Indian tribes. After all, the Spaniards brought in a lot of Indians from Yucatan after the local Tainos were nearly liquidated.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Eternitat
                        I did read somewhere that the Yanomami were their ancestors due to the language and customs. Kinda like Latin being the ancestor of Spanish and other Romance languages.

                        While it is possible that the Yanomami were not the only ancestors of the Tainos, it is suspected to be likelier that the A was introduced from other Indian tribes. After all, the Spaniards brought in a lot of Indians from Yucatan after the local Tainos were nearly liquidated.
                        Right. Anthropology sometimes is at odds with genetics but if I had to believe one statement over the other I'd choose the veredict of genetics. Read the following quote from a study about Puerto Rican mtDNA:

                        Native American haplogroup frequency analysis shows a highly structured distribution, suggesting that the contribution of Native Americans foreign to Puerto Rico is minimal. Haplogroups A and C cover 56.0% and 35.6% of the Native American mtDNAs, respectively. No haplogroup D mtDNAs were found. Most of the linguistic, biological, and cultural evidence suggests that the Ceramic culture of the Tainos originated in or close to the Yanomama territory in the Amazon. However, the absence of haplogroup A in the Yanomami suggests that the Yanomami are not the only Taino ancestors.
                        Even if the Taino culture originated close to the Yanomama territory doesn't necessarily mean they were related. DNA disproves that relationship.

                        Taken from:
                        http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...08/ai_n8981492

                        Victor

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                        • #27
                          What a mystery.

                          I wish I knew the answer for sure.

                          All the Indians in the island seem to know each other well and live in specific regions. And my grandmother's family never lived anywhere near them.

                          She could care less if there is an Indian in the family or not. She just finds it suspicious since she knew nothing about it. But it does not matter to her and wonders why in the world am I searching this kind of info.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Eternitat
                            What a mystery.

                            I wish I knew the answer for sure.

                            All the Indians in the island seem to know each other well and live in specific regions. And my grandmother's family never lived anywhere near them.

                            She could care less if there is an Indian in the family or not. She just finds it suspicious since she knew nothing about it. But it does not matter to her and wonders why in the world am I searching this kind of info.
                            At some point or another everyone knows nothing of what happened in the past. How many generations have you documented before your grandmother? Going backwards to colonial times you could easily fit from 10 to 15 generations starting with yourself.

                            This is a great opportunity for you to decipher the mystery and share your findings with the rest of the family. And with us.... if you care to.

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