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  • Unexpected Results

    Hello Everyone,

    I just received my mtDNA results and was quite taken back by the results. How does a European haplogroup "K" show up in the mtDNA of an American Indian from Oregon??? I am confused as these results would presumably "trash" all of my female lineage research to this date. Any others who have experienced this?

    Thanks,
    Bob

  • #2
    Is there a distant relative in the female line of descent that you can test?

    Like one of you grandmother's daughters (a great-aunt) for example? That would be my first step.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks. It is a good idea. I will see to whom I may have access.
      Bob

      Comment


      • #4
        Bob, remember that your mtdna line only taps one of thousands of your "grandmothers". An autosomal test (Ancestry by dna or Ethnoancestry) would give more complete information.

        Comment


        • #5
          Bob, that is an unexpected result, and the first thing to do is to confirm its accuracy. Testing another relative with the same female line heritage is a good idea as mentioned already. Trying your own DNA with a different company is another good idea. If you get the same result, remember that such things, while unusual, did happen. Quanah Parker of the Comanche comes to mind.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bob Swinea
            Hello Everyone,

            I just received my mtDNA results and was quite taken back by the results. How does a European haplogroup "K" show up in the mtDNA of an American Indian from Oregon??? I am confused as these results would presumably "trash" all of my female lineage research to this date. Any others who have experienced this?

            Thanks,
            Bob
            Bob,

            Maybe a European woman was taken into your tribe long ago. Wasn't that known to happen in some Native American tribes? If that were the case, everyone else could have been Native American but that one woman's mtDNA would still get passed down through the generations because that's how mtDNA is. If you've got records that show that your female lineage is Native American then it most likely means she lived a very long time ago. Too long to have an effect on your degree of Native American.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you. That's a thought I have not considered yet. My geneology shows all of my grammas back to the 1750's were Cherokee. Before my original Cherokee gramma [probably born about 1730 in TN] its anyone's guess. I'll keep working on it. I appreciate all of the helpful ideas. I am having my Y-12 marker done now too. I had considered an autosomial DNA test. Maybe early next year after I digest some of what I am getting. Again, thanks.
              Bob

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey, I got surprised in the reverse way.

                As far as my maternal grandmother knows, ALL her ancestors came from the Canary Islands.

                Yet I turned out to be haplogroup A. Which is one of the Native American Indian haplogroups.

                A haplogroup NOT present in the original Taino population upon the time of the discovery, although it is present in the modern ones due to mixing with Indians from Yucatan.

                That haplogroup A has shown up in several people in Spain (including THE Canary Islands) does not surprise me due to back migrations. That it has shown up in Italy, Sweden, Germany, and Ireland does.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Men did occasionally return "home" to Europe with "native" American wives. Or children or grandchildren born here could have migrated back to almost anywhere in Europe. Not really all that surprising. In one case, that of the Russian colony at Fort Ross on the California coast north of San Francisco, it is well documented that the Russians, when they packed up and left, took their native wives with them back to Russia. Isn't DNA amazing?

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                  • #10
                    That makes sense.

                    Haplogroup A was not present in the original Indian population of where my mother's family's from. So it would have been an Indian lady from Yucatan or somewhere else that this haplogroup was present.

                    Of course, it would be theoretically possible that some A-women stayed back in the old continent and made it to Europe another way. But that's not likely.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ohmygosh ...DNA is most certainly amazing. The heritage from the Canary Island [haplogroup A] is incredible too. That gives me several ideas of directions in which to move. In the southeastern US [old Cherokee Nation] by the 1700's had been travelled and sometimes settled by Spanish and then French and then the British. We traded with them and raided them as they us. It is not beyond reason to make a preliminary assumption that somewhere Eupopean mtDNA [haplogroup K] got into my line. I have read that sometimes European captives found better treatment with we Cherokees. All I am able to find about my "first" Cherokee gramma comes from British records from Ft Loudon [1757-1760 in TN] that states that William Shorey [the second interpretor for the garrison] took a Cherokee woman named Ghigooie as a wife. She was of BirdClan. Ghigooie means "sweetheart" in Cherokee. She was from the adjacent Cherokee village of Tuskeegee - Sequoya [the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet] would have been a Clan Uncle to her. Beyond that written history is mute. British settlers had been moving into the Wautauga Valley near there for about a generation before. I noted that in my FTDNA mtDNA anonymous search that my mtDNA had two "spikes" [not surprisingly] England and Ireland. OK...I am so grateful for these posts... in Cherokee
                      wado nigada, galieliga yigi
                      Thanks everyone ...I am grateful
                      Bob

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Testing handy

                        Originally posted by Bob Swinea
                        Hello Everyone,

                        I just received my mtDNA results and was quite taken back by the results. How does a European haplogroup "K" show up in the mtDNA of an American Indian from Oregon??? I am confused as these results would presumably "trash" all of my female lineage research to this date. Any others who have experienced this?

                        Thanks,
                        Bob
                        HEY,
                        Card carrying Indians ought to be DNA tested at some point.Many do get tested tosee what kind and how much Indian they got.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Interesting

                          Originally posted by Bob Swinea
                          Ohmygosh ...DNA is most certainly amazing. The heritage from the Canary Island [haplogroup A] is incredible too. That gives me several ideas of directions in which to move. In the southeastern US [old Cherokee Nation] by the 1700's had been travelled and sometimes settled by Spanish and then French and then the British. We traded with them and raided them as they us. It is not beyond reason to make a preliminary assumption that somewhere Eupopean mtDNA [haplogroup K] got into my line. I have read that sometimes European captives found better treatment with we Cherokees. All I am able to find about my "first" Cherokee gramma comes from British records from Ft Loudon [1757-1760 in TN] that states that William Shorey [the second interpretor for the garrison] took a Cherokee woman named Ghigooie as a wife. She was of BirdClan. Ghigooie means "sweetheart" in Cherokee. She was from the adjacent Cherokee village of Tuskeegee - Sequoya [the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet] would have been a Clan Uncle to her. Beyond that written history is mute. British settlers had been moving into the Wautauga Valley near there for about a generation before. I noted that in my FTDNA mtDNA anonymous search that my mtDNA had two "spikes" [not surprisingly] England and Ireland. OK...I am so grateful for these posts... in Cherokee
                          wado nigada, galieliga yigi
                          Thanks everyone ...I am grateful
                          Bob
                          Quite an Interesting history you have Indeed! A real Indian and a real White man.Wowie! Adventurous. Someone in the CanaryIsland is somesimilar to me too; he's mtU6(Berber-Labanese).Some mtK's are half German and Half S.Caucasian-of S..Europe, sometypesofArab andBerber.But I've no Native American Indian-they haven't raided my village yet-bet they never will.
                          Last edited by Jambalaia32; 30 December 2005, 01:47 PM. Reason: misspelling

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Merry Christmas

                            Originally posted by Bob Swinea
                            Hello Everyone,

                            I just received my mtDNA results and was quite taken back by the results. How does a European haplogroup "K" show up in the mtDNA of an American Indian from Oregon??? I am confused as these results would presumably "trash" all of my female lineage research to this date. Any others who have experienced this?

                            Thanks,
                            Bob
                            Hey! Merry Christmas.Do partwhite men that are card carrying Indians celebrate Christmas?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bob Swinea
                              Hello Everyone,

                              I just received my mtDNA results and was quite taken back by the results. How does a European haplogroup "K" show up in the mtDNA of an American Indian from Oregon??? I am confused as these results would presumably "trash" all of my female lineage research to this date. Any others who have experienced this?

                              Thanks,
                              Bob

                              ONE OF THE WOMEN IN YOUR MOMS LINE WASNT AMERICAN INDIAN OR K BELONGS THERE TOO

                              Comment

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